Navigation Links
Molecular motor works by detecting minute changes in force
Date:7/9/2008

PHILADELPHIA - Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine discovered that the activity of a specific family of nanometer-sized molecular motors called myosin-I is regulated by force. The motor puts tension on cellular springs that allow vibrations to be detected within the body. This finely tuned regulation has important implications for understanding a wide variety of basic cellular processes, including hearing and balance and glucose uptake in response to insulin. The findings appear in the most recent issue of Science.

"This is the first demonstration that myosin-I shows such dramatic sensitivity to tension," says senior author E. Michael Ostap, Ph.D., Associate Director, Pennsylvania Muscle Institute and Associate Professor of Physiology. "It is surprising that a molecular motor can sense such small changes in force."

Myosin-I is a biological motor that uses the chemical energy made by cells to ferry proteins within cells and to generate force, powering the movement of molecular cargos in nearly all cells.

In two specific cases, myosin I puts tension on the specialized spring-like structures in human ears that enable hearing and maintenance of balance, and also has a role in delivering the proteins that pump glucose into cells in response to insulin. "However, why a tension-sensing molecular motor is needed for this function is unknown," says Ostap.

In collaboration with Henry Shuman, PhD, Associate Professor of Physiology, the research team used optical tweezers -- a combination focused laser beam and microscope, of sorts -- to measure incredibly small forces and movements (on the piconewton and nanometer level) to discover that myosin I motors are regulated by force. The motors pull on their cellular cargos until a certain tension is attained, after which they stop moving, but will hold the tension. If something happens in the cell to decrease this tension, the motor will restart its activity and will restore the lost tension.

Myosins use the energy from ATP to generate force and motion. Humans have 40 myosin genes that sort into 12 myosin families. Members of the myosin family have been found in every type of cell researchers have examined. The Ostap lab is investigating the biochemical properties of several members of the myosin family to better understand movement in cells, which is important in development, wound healing, the immune response, and the spread of cancer, among other functions. These new findings shed light on the role of myosin I in cells, supporting the notion that this molecular motor is more important in generating and sustaining tension rather than transporting protein cargo.

The research team will now apply these results to better understand how cells use these tension sensors to carry out their physiological functions.


'/>"/>

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. A new molecular zip code, and a new drug target for Huntingtons disease
2. New knock-out gene model provides molecular clues to breast cancer
3. Molecular probe paints cancer cells in living animals, Stanford researchers find
4. Story ideas from molecular & cellular proteomics
5. SNM seeks novel approaches to molecular imaging to showcase at annual meeting
6. SNM seeks novel approaches to molecular imaging to showcase at annual meeting
7. Molecular fingerprint of breast-cancer drug resistance can predict response to treatment
8. Molecular profiling can accurately predict survival in colon cancer patients
9. Xceed Molecular Names Fran Tuttle to Its Board of Trustees
10. Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust and Flinn Foundation launch molecular diagnostics initiative
11. Xceed Molecular Launches Ziplex(R) Automated Gene-Expression System at the Association for Molecular Pathology, Booth 84/85
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... While it’s often important ... problem. Fortunately, an inventor from Austin, Texas, has identified a solution. , She developed ... darkness or restricted lighting. As such, it eliminates the need to turn on a ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 13, ... ... School of Pharmacy (SOP) alumni Hannah Randall, PharmD ‘17, and Jennifer Huggins, ... professionals on guideline updates for the primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases during ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... The Visiting Nurse Association (VNA) of Somerset ... of specialty vendors and unique items from across the nation, this holiday-themed event will ... services offered by the VNA. The boutique will be open Saturday, November 4 ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... , ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... be giving viewers the lowdown on sciatica in a new episode of "Success ... focuses on current events and innovation and investigates each subject in-depth with passion ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... services for healthcare compliance program management, will showcase a range of technology and ... for Assisted Living (NCAL) Convention and Expo to be held October 14–18, 2017 ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/2/2017)... COPENHAGEN, Denmark , Oct. 2, 2017 The ... tool in the struggle to reverse the tide of prescription ... plan for regulating their medicine intake and stepping down their ... is set to launch in December 2017; the first 100,000 ... access. Learn more at http://www.rebound-solution.com/ ...
(Date:9/28/2017)... , Sept. 28, 2017 Cohen Veterans ... advance the use of wearable and home sensors for ... disorders. Early Signal Foundation, a nonprofit organization focused on ... will provide an affordable analytical system to record and ... ...
(Date:9/27/2017)... NEW YORK , Sept. 27, 2017  DarioHealth Corp. ... big data solutions, today announced that its MyDario product is expected to ... TV listings for when The Dr. Oz Show airs in your area: ... The nine-time Emmy award-winning, ... ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: