Navigation Links
Molecular master switch for pancreatic cancer identified, potential predictor of treatment outcome
Date:2/12/2013

PHILADELPHIA A recently described master regulator protein may explain the development of aberrant cell growth in the pancreas spurred by inflammation

A team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania profiled gene expression of mouse pancreatic ductal and duct-like cells from different states - embryonic development, acute pancreatitis and K-ras mutation-driven carcinogenesis - to find the molecular regulation of these processes.

Broadly speaking, two cellular compartments are important in a normal pancreas, endocrine cells, which produce hormones including insulin, and exocrine cells acinar and ductal -- which make and secrete digestive enzymes.

A cover article from the lab of Anil Rustgi, MD, Chief, Division of Gastroenterology, published early online in Genes and Development, details the molecular changes of exocrine cells during inflammation, so-called acinar-ductal metaplasia (ADM), a prelude to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

They used cell lineage tracing to follow what happens to the regulator protein called Prrx1 as cells change characteristics. Another protein, Sox9, which is downstream of Prrx1 in the cell signal pathway, is also important in understanding how pancreatic cancer forms, as the group has established the first link of Prrx1 to Sox9. The findings suggest that Prrx1 and Sox9 influence the emergence of an intermediate cell type that can give rise to cancer.

Inflammation is Key Culprit

Inflammation of the pancreas, or pancreatitis, is a leading reason for hospital admission, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), and chronic pancreatitis is a risk factor for cancer of the pancreas. Each year, about 210,000 people in the United States are admitted to the hospital with acute pancreatitis.

Acute pancreatitis is caused by alcohol abuse, gallstones, and autoimmune disorders. When things go wrong, inflammatory pancreatitis happens, and the change from an acute state to a chronic state can lead to cancer.

When a patient recovers from pancreatitis, the change in cell fate reverts to the original cell type. But, if the pancreatitis is chronic, changed cells stay changed.

"We hope that studies like this one that identify key molecules and pathways that govern the cancerous fate of cells can be used as diagnostic predictors of treatment outcome and severity for cancer," says Rustgi.


'/>"/>

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.ed
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. New details on the molecular machinery of cancer
2. U of M researchers develop a molecular calcium sponge to tackle heart failure
3. Researchers use new molecular inhibitors to successfully hit difficult cancer target
4. PLEXERA® LLC Launches Contract Research Services Business for Biomolecular Interaction Studies
5. Research suggests molecular switch may play role in tumor suppression
6. Trying to halt hepatitis Cs molecular hijacking
7. Springer launches new journal with the Italian Association of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
8. Metabolic biomarkers for preventive molecular medicine
9. Scientists at the Institute of Molecular Biology identify key event for sex determination
10. Researchers link new molecular culprit to breast cancer progression
11. 22 young group leaders recognized as European Molecular Biology Organization Young Investigators
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Molecular master switch for pancreatic cancer identified, potential predictor of treatment outcome
(Date:2/8/2016)... KS (PRWEB) , ... February 08, 2016 , ... TopConsumerReviews.com ... leader in Mole removal products. , Moles are derived from a cluster of melanin ... in all the wrong places and create a lifetime of embarrassment. Historically, mole ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... February 08, 2016 , ... Guruji Mahendra Kumar Trivedi is offering 3 ... in honor of his birthday on February 10th. During this time, people can ... known by over 250,000 people from over 40 different countries as an “ordinary man ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... February 08, 2016 , ... According to ... the U.S. require dental technicians to be certified or obtain continuing education. To ... created the “What’s In Your Mouth?” campaign to inform dentists and patients about ...
(Date:2/7/2016)... Clarkston, Metamora, Michigan (PRWEB) , ... February 07, 2016 , ... ... in recognition of National Wear Red Day. National Wear Red Day is the ... stroke in women. Heart disease and stroke cause 1 in 3 deaths among women ...
(Date:2/7/2016)... ... February 07, 2016 , ... Dr. Todd Hobgood ... his medical and surgical expertise. Technically known as deoxycholic acid or previously as ... a non-surgical alternative for reduction of fat below the chin (aka the “double ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/8/2016)... LONDON , Feb.8, 2016 Aesthetic Devices ... GlobalData,s Medical Devices sector report, "Aesthetic Devices - Medical ... Devices currently in pipeline stage. This ... secondary and primary research by GlobalData,s team of industry ... be removed or altered based on the availability and ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... , Feb. 8, 2016 CBG ... the PW Series Solvent Recycling Systems, specifically designed ... full integration with new and existing vapor degreasers, ... produces consistently-fresh solvent through continuous recycling and recovers ... --> --> Precision parts ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... 8, 2016  Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. (Nasdaq: NBIX ... fourth quarter and year-end 2015 results after the Nasdaq ... then host a live conference call and webcast to ... Thursday afternoon, February 11, 2016 at 4:30 p.m. Eastern ... --> http://www.neurocrine.com . --> Participants ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: