Navigation Links
Mix of Genetics and Stress Can Impair Mental Abilities
Date:3/7/2011

MONDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- Genetics may predispose some people who live in so-called "hazardous" neighborhoods -- where fear and stress are a fact of daily life -- to face a higher risk for age-related cognitive decline, new research warns.

The culprit is a specific abnormality of the apolipoprotein E gene. The study authors noted that while this gene is known to play a key role in the normal maintenance of basic neurological health, a certain mutation of this gene has also previously been linked to a higher risk for the early onset of Alzheimer's disease.

Now a team of researchers led by Brian K. Lee, of Drexel University in Philadelphia, has found that those carrying the mutation may also face a higher risk for cognitive impairment when they get older, if they live in the kind of threatening environment that routinely elicits "a biological stress response."

The observation is reported in the March issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

The new finding stems from an analysis of mental health data collected during the Baltimore Memory Study, which involved more than 1,100 urban residents living in 63 Baltimore neighborhoods.

All of the study participants were between the ages of 50 and 70. About 54 percent were white; nearly 42 percent were black.

As a whole, 30 percent were found to carry at least one mutation of the gene in question, the researchers found. However, blacks were more likely to carry the mutation than whites (37.3 percent versus 24.7 percent, respectively).

Genetics, in fact, wasn't the sole determinant of how well a person performed on cognitive tests. Any participant living in a stress-inducing environment, regardless of whether they possessed the mutation in question, performed "substantially" worse on the series of tests, which among other things included a focus on language skills, verbal memory and learning, eye-hand coordination and visual memory.

What's more, among those without the telltale mutation, those living in relatively more hazardous neighborhoods performed no worse on cognitive testing than those living in better neighborhoods. And among those with the mutation, those living in relatively better conditions executed the test skills equally well as those without the mutation, according to the study authors.

However, Lee's team found that those who carried the mutation, and also lived in neighborhoods characterized as the most psychosocially hazardous, performed the worst in terms of cognitive skills such as eye-hand coordination, task execution, processing speed and visual-spatial abilities.

More information

For more on mental health, visit the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health.

-- Alan Mozes

SOURCE: Archives of General Psychiatry, news release, March 7, 2011


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Interleukin Genetics, Inc. and Stanford University Report Genetic Test Improves Weight Loss Success With Diets
2. Study finds changes in fetal epigenetics throughout pregnancy
3. Genetics, Psychology May Trigger ADHD
4. Resveratrol Supplement Company RevGenetics Welcomes New Chief Science Officer
5. Mount Sinai School of Medicine Commencement Honors Leaders in Genetics and Global Health
6. Cancer genetics pioneer wins Margaret Kripke Legend Award
7. Genetics of childrens brain tumor unlocked
8. Existence Genetics is Pioneering the Field of Predictive Medicine - Nexus Technologies Critical in Understanding and Preventing Deadly Disease
9. Genetics, Insecticides Might Contribute to Parkinsons
10. Can I buy you a drink? Genetics may determine sensitivity to other peoples drinking behavior
11. Perspectives on improving patient care: Genetics, personalized medicine, and behavioral intervention
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Mix of Genetics and Stress Can Impair Mental Abilities
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... 13, 2017 , ... While it’s often important to take certain medications during ... Austin, Texas, has identified a solution. , She developed a prototype for MOTION LIGHT-UP ... such, it eliminates the need to turn on a light when taking medication during ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 13, ... ... School of Pharmacy (SOP) alumni Hannah Randall, PharmD ‘17, and Jennifer Huggins, ... professionals on guideline updates for the primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases during ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... The Visiting ... Day Market. Featuring a collection of specialty vendors and unique items from across the ... and quality-focused health and wellness services offered by the VNA. The boutique will ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... will be giving viewers the lowdown on sciatica in a new episode of ... that focuses on current events and innovation and investigates each subject in-depth with ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... services for healthcare compliance program management, will showcase a range of technology and ... for Assisted Living (NCAL) Convention and Expo to be held October 14–18, 2017 ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/27/2017)... Israel and NEW YORK , Sept. 27, ... with mobile health and big data solutions, today announced that its MyDario ... Please check your local TV listings for when The Dr. Oz Show ... ... season this month. ...
(Date:9/22/2017)... Md. , Sept. 22, 2017  As the ... Republican Senators Bill Cassidy (R-LA) and ... Information notes that the medical device industry is in ... medical device tax, the 2.3% excise tax on medical ... But they also want covered patients, increased visits and ...
(Date:9/18/2017)... , Pa. and KALAMAZOO, Mich. , ... Allentown, Penn. , and OptiMed Specialty Pharmacy of ... business partnership to offer a strategic hub service that ... Healthcare,s highly sought-after personal spirometer, Spiro PD 2.0, and ... A spirometer is a medical device used to ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: