Navigation Links
Mix of Genetics and Stress Can Impair Mental Abilities
Date:3/7/2011

MONDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- Genetics may predispose some people who live in so-called "hazardous" neighborhoods -- where fear and stress are a fact of daily life -- to face a higher risk for age-related cognitive decline, new research warns.

The culprit is a specific abnormality of the apolipoprotein E gene. The study authors noted that while this gene is known to play a key role in the normal maintenance of basic neurological health, a certain mutation of this gene has also previously been linked to a higher risk for the early onset of Alzheimer's disease.

Now a team of researchers led by Brian K. Lee, of Drexel University in Philadelphia, has found that those carrying the mutation may also face a higher risk for cognitive impairment when they get older, if they live in the kind of threatening environment that routinely elicits "a biological stress response."

The observation is reported in the March issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

The new finding stems from an analysis of mental health data collected during the Baltimore Memory Study, which involved more than 1,100 urban residents living in 63 Baltimore neighborhoods.

All of the study participants were between the ages of 50 and 70. About 54 percent were white; nearly 42 percent were black.

As a whole, 30 percent were found to carry at least one mutation of the gene in question, the researchers found. However, blacks were more likely to carry the mutation than whites (37.3 percent versus 24.7 percent, respectively).

Genetics, in fact, wasn't the sole determinant of how well a person performed on cognitive tests. Any participant living in a stress-inducing environment, regardless of whether they possessed the mutation in question, performed "substantially" worse on the series of tests, which among other things included a focus on language skills, verbal memory and learning, eye-hand coordination and visual memory.

What's more, among those without the telltale mutation, those living in relatively more hazardous neighborhoods performed no worse on cognitive testing than those living in better neighborhoods. And among those with the mutation, those living in relatively better conditions executed the test skills equally well as those without the mutation, according to the study authors.

However, Lee's team found that those who carried the mutation, and also lived in neighborhoods characterized as the most psychosocially hazardous, performed the worst in terms of cognitive skills such as eye-hand coordination, task execution, processing speed and visual-spatial abilities.

More information

For more on mental health, visit the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health.

-- Alan Mozes

SOURCE: Archives of General Psychiatry, news release, March 7, 2011


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Interleukin Genetics, Inc. and Stanford University Report Genetic Test Improves Weight Loss Success With Diets
2. Study finds changes in fetal epigenetics throughout pregnancy
3. Genetics, Psychology May Trigger ADHD
4. Resveratrol Supplement Company RevGenetics Welcomes New Chief Science Officer
5. Mount Sinai School of Medicine Commencement Honors Leaders in Genetics and Global Health
6. Cancer genetics pioneer wins Margaret Kripke Legend Award
7. Genetics of childrens brain tumor unlocked
8. Existence Genetics is Pioneering the Field of Predictive Medicine - Nexus Technologies Critical in Understanding and Preventing Deadly Disease
9. Genetics, Insecticides Might Contribute to Parkinsons
10. Can I buy you a drink? Genetics may determine sensitivity to other peoples drinking behavior
11. Perspectives on improving patient care: Genetics, personalized medicine, and behavioral intervention
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Mix of Genetics and Stress Can Impair Mental Abilities
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... 13, 2017 , ... The American Board of Family Medicine's (ABFM) Board of ... Executive Officer, succeeding Dr. James C. Puffer upon his retirement. Dr. Newton will serve ... Puffer’s retirement at the end of 2018. Upon assuming the role of President and ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... Apple ... care services, staged a mock evacuation of the facility as part of a disaster ... Fire Department, Echo Hose EMS and Shelton City Emergency Manager, as well as the ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... Texas (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... Yisrayl ... this week that explains one of the most popular and least understood books in ... like cryptic and puzzling descriptions that have baffled scholars for centuries. Many have tossed ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... First Healthcare Compliance (FHC), ... will showcase a range of technology and learning solutions at the 68th Annual ... Expo to be held October 14–18, 2017 at the Mandalay Bay Resort in ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... MD (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... The ... of Excellence to Carol Friedman, PhD, FACMI, during the Opening Session of AMIA’s Annual ... – 8. , In honor of Morris F. Collen, a pioneer in the field ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/22/2017)... 2017  As the latest Obamacare repeal effort moves ... (R-LA) and Lindsey Graham (R-SC) medical ... device industry is in an odd place.  The industry ... excise tax on medical device sales passed along with ... patients, increased visits and hospital customers with the funding ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... venture-backed medical device company developing a non-invasive, robotically assisted, platform therapy that uses pulsed sound ... ... Jim Bertolina, PhD ... Tom Tefft ... device executive Josh Stopek , PhD, who has led R&D and business development teams ...
(Date:9/18/2017)... Mich. , Sept. 18, 2017  PMD Healthcare ... Specialty Pharmacy of Kalamazoo, Mich. , ... hub service that expedites and streamlines patient and provider ... PD 2.0, and wellness management services.  ... device used to measure lung function for a variety ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: