Navigation Links
Minorities less likely to know about breast cancer treatment options
Date:7/30/2008

ANN ARBOR, Mich. Nearly half of women treated for breast cancer did not know that their odds of being alive after five years are roughly the same whether they undergo mastectomy or breast conserving surgery. Minority women were even less likely to be aware of this important factor of their treatment decision, according to a study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Minority women were also less likely to know about relative survival rates even when researchers considered factors such as the surgeon's experience, the type of hospital, and whether patients reported talking to their surgeon about treatment options.

"These factors traditionally associated with quality care were not associated with informed decision-making or with our knowledge measures. Surgeon volume or treatment setting did not affect whether women had good knowledge of their treatment options after they had been through the process, nor did it really mediate the racial and ethnic differences we found," says study author Sarah Hawley, Ph.D., a research investigator at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Results of the study appear in the August issue of Health Services Research.

The researchers surveyed 1,132 breast cancer patients and asked them whether the chances of being alive five years after surgery were the same after a mastectomy or after lumpectomy with radiation, and whether the chance of breast cancer coming back after treatment was the same for the two surgeries.

Overall, only 51 percent responded correctly to the survival question, but the numbers varied significantly for minorities: 57 percent of whites answered correctly, 34 percent of African-Americans knew their survival odds, and 37 percent of Latinas did.

The researchers found similar results for the recurrence question. Overall, 48 percent said they did not know the answer to the recurrence question, with African-Americans and Latinas significantly more likely to answer "don't know." Research shows that both survival and recurrence are about the same for both surgical options.

Researchers then looked at whether the women were treated by a general surgeon or one who specializes in breast cancer procedures, as well as whether the woman was treated at a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center or in a community hospital setting.

They found that even when factoring these points in, minority women still were less likely to be knowledgeable about survival.

"It's important for women to be able to do what we call a high-quality decision-making process. That would mean that the decision needs to be well-informed, based on an accurate knowledge of the risks and benefits of the options, and it also needs to be based on their preferences. If women do not make an informed decision, they're more likely to be dissatisfied down the road with the treatment they received," Hawley says.

The researchers did find, however, that patients who said their surgeon described both treatment options more often had adequate knowledge. The findings indicate that not all patients are clearly understanding information their surgeons may be telling them. The researchers urge surgeons to make sure they communicate information about treatment options, including survival and recurrence risks, during the initial visit in a way that is culturally and ethnically appropriate.

The researchers also urge patients to be aware of their treatment options. "Be sure to ask questions of your surgeon and consider exploring other avenues for getting information," Hawley says.

Breast cancer statistics: 184,450 Americans will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year and 40,930 will die from the disease, according to the American Cancer Society

Methodology: The researchers surveyed 1,132 women recently diagnosed with breast cancer in the Detroit and Los Angeles metropolitan areas. Information was collected from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Registry, a database maintained by the National Cancer Institute that collects information about cancer incidence, treatment and mortality. Patients were matched to 277 surgeons, who were also surveyed. About 73 percent of the women were white, 18 percent were African-American and 9 percent were Latino or other ethnicity.


'/>"/>

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Minorities more likely to have sleep durations associated with increased mortality
2. Minorities Less Likely to Get Powerful Painkillers in ER
3. UCLA launches network to study health care disparities affecting minorities
4. Minorities, whites get equal care in hospitals
5. Minorities, Poor Have Tougher Time Monitoring Diabetes
6. State of Cancer Care for Nations Poor and Minorities Is Focus of Conference in Washington
7. Patient Navigators Boost Colon Screens in Urban Minorities
8. Seniors, minorities to have largest impact on tomorrows America
9. Scientists ID Likely Culprit in Popcorn Lung
10. Pop stars more than twice as likely to die an early death
11. Smokers More Likely to Develop Dementia
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/23/2017)... ... 2017 , ... On 2 March 2017, the United States ... Command’s Patriot Award. The award was presented by the USSOCOM Commander, General Raymond ... its significant and enduring support to the command. , Accepting the award ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... ... March 23, 2017 , ... The Boulevard is honored to host Shriners and ... will be located in the Main West Entrance of The Boulevard (in front of ... appointment is necessary and each child with a parent or guardian will be photographed ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... ... ... News Advisory/Interview Opportunity , After six years of advocacy, testimony and grassroots organizing, ... health and the environment and is calling on the United States to follow the ... of European citizens, the European Union (EU) will, beginning next year, ban the use ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... ... ... Woman Be Ye Healed-Passing On A Legacy”: a call to heal the wounded Church. ... author, Desiree M Webb, a registered nurse, minister of music, speaker, songwriter, recording artist, ... husband, Paul, for over twenty-nine years. Desiree enjoys writing, beach trips, ministering in ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... ... March 23, 2017 , ... Ogden ... innovative patient - centric payment system, to expand its focus on patient care ... patient financial experience. , “At Ogden Clinic, we are working to become ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/23/2017)... 2017  A new genetic test has been ... individuals who carry HLA-B*15:02 and who ... potentially deadly side effect of certain medications used ... HLA-B*15:02 is strongly associated with life-threatening ... and toxic epidermal necrolysis in patients treated with ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... March 23, 2017 On ... the trading session at 5,821.64, up 0.48%; the ... finish at 20,661.30; and the S&P 500 closed ... based as six out of nine sectors ended ... initiated reports coverage on the following Medical Instruments ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... 2017 Pre-market today, Stock-Callers.com has issued ... AGN), Horizon Pharma PLC (NASDAQ: HZNP), and Evoke Pharma Inc. ... part of the Healthcare sector, which was slightly higher in ... the NYSE Health Care Index adding about 0.1% in value, ... also were up nearly 0.1% as a group. Learn more ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: