Navigation Links
Migraine Sufferers Stigmatized Because of Their Condition: Study
Date:1/17/2013

By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- People who suffer from frequent migraines are stigmatized in much the same way as people with epilepsy are, new research suggests.

"This study is providing evidence for what we all sort of knew was the case," said Dr. Noah Rosen, director of the Headache Center at the Cushing Neuroscience Institute at North Shore-LIJ Health System, in Manhasset, N.Y. He was not involved in the research.

Not only are migraine patients stigmatized, but so is the condition itself in terms of getting research money, Rosen noted. "It's not getting the recognition it really should, given the prevalence and disability associated with it," he said.

Migraine pain and symptoms affect 29.5 million Americans, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Rosen believes that because migraine -- which causes a combination of severe headache, nausea, light sensitivity and other factors -- affects patients' work and social lives, the people around them stigmatize them as unreliable.

"Migraine is a disease morbidity, not mortality," Rosen said. "That's why it doesn't get the respect that it really requires."

Moreover, people who can't feel the pain a migraine sufferer is going through can't appreciate how debilitating it can be, Rosen added.

Rosen believes that family and coworkers of people with migraine need to be educated about the condition. In addition, workplaces may need to be altered to remove things that can trigger a migraine, he suggested.

These triggers include stress and poor environmental conditions, which can be changed to reduce the likelihood of setting off a migraine, Rosen explained.

In a statement from the Thomas Jefferson University Hospital's Headache Center in Philadelphia, study author and neurologist Dr. William Young, said: "I don't think people realize that it is not unusual for people with migraine to have severe headaches every day -- to be so disabled that they are unable to work. This is what causes the stigma -- the fact that people with severe migraine may not be able to work."

And, Young added, "When people treat my patients as if they are to blame because they have a severe, debilitating disease, they are contributing to the problem and making life harder for them."

The study, by Young and colleagues at Thomas Jefferson and Rutgers University, was published online Jan. 16 in the journal PloS One.

To see how people with migraine were treated, Young's team collected data on 123 people with episodic migraine (defined as 14 or fewer headaches per month), 123 people with chronic migraine (more than 14 headaches per month with eight meeting the criteria for migraine), and 62 people with epilepsy. To evaluate these participants, the researchers used a so-called stigma scale for chronic illness.

Epilepsy patients were chosen for comparison because their condition, which can cause seizures, is known to carry a stigma for many people, the researchers noted.

The investigators found that people with chronic migraine scored significantly higher on the stigma score (54) than those with episodic migraine (42) and even higher than those with epilepsy (45).

Adjusting the scores for other factors, Young and colleagues found the score roughly equal for people with epilepsy and chronic migraine, while the scores for those with episodic migraine were much lower.

People with chronic migraine tended to miss more days of work than those with epilepsy. Many with migraine need bed rest during the day of the migraine, which can occurr several times during the month, the researchers noted.

As Rosen pointed out, migraine is often considered "just a headache," not a major health problem.

In Young's clinic, however, 25 percent of migraine patients cannot hold a job because of the disease and many more suffer severe headaches almost every day, he pointed out. Severe depression and even suicidal thoughts are common among patients with chronic migraine, he added.

More information

For more on migraine, visit the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

SOURCES: Noah Rosen, M.D., director, Headache Center, Cushing Neuroscience Institute, North Shore-LIJ Health System, Manhasset, N.Y.; Thomas Jefferson University Hospital Headache Center, news release, Jan. 16, 2013; Jan. 16, 2013, PLoS One, online


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Migraine With Aura May Raise Risk of Heart Trouble
2. Study Suggests Genetic Link Between Epilepsy, Migraine
3. Caddy Products, LLC, Makers of FaceCaddy Therapeutic Ice and Heat Wrap, Launches EyesCaddy and BackCaddy to Address Sinus Pain, Migraines and Back Pain.
4. Migraine-associated brain changes not related to impaired cognition
5. Migraine Sufferers Show More Brain Changes Than Others: Study
6. New mobile app helps migraine sufferers track and analyze pain
7. Migraines May Hurt Kids Grades Too
8. Behavior issues are a bigger headache for children with migraines
9. Migraines Not Linked to Decline in Thinking Skills
10. Good news: Migraines hurt your head but not your brain
11. Published clinical trial demonstrates efficacy of Sea-Band for migraine-related nausea
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Migraine Sufferers Stigmatized Because of Their Condition: Study
(Date:5/24/2017)... ... May 24, 2017 , ... The CFOs included on ... health systems in the nation and help their organizations navigate the challenges in ... been instrumental in developing successful hospital and health system strategy. , Becker's Hospital ...
(Date:5/24/2017)... , ... May 24, 2017 , ... Technique, technique, technique ... injury when either lifting weights for strength training and exercise or simply lifting heavy ... . , “Body position is everything,” Dr. Chang says. “Improper technique in lifting anything ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... ... 23, 2017 , ... MDLand International (MDLand), a leading Electronic ... its iClinic V12.2 solution has achieved approval from National Center for Quality Assurance ... standards which emphasize team-based care with a significant focus on the care management ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Allegheny Health Network and the Alexis Joy ... Women’s Behavioral Health at West Penn Hospital , a unique facility that will ... pregnancy-related depression. Construction of the Center is underway with a scheduled opening in ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... ... May 23, 2017 , ... Cambridge, ... remained steady since 2009, according to a Workers Compensation Research Institute (WCRI) study, ... Monitoring the North Carolina System: CompScope™ Benchmarks, 17th Edition looks at indemnity ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/11/2017)... May 11, 2017  Thornhill Research Inc. ( ... awarded an $8,049,024 USD five-year, firm-fixed-priced, indefinite-quantity/indefinite-delivery contract ... Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC) ( Ottawa, Ontario, ... to administer general anesthesia to patients requiring emergency ... "The US Marine Corps have been a longtime ...
(Date:5/10/2017)... -- Radiology has become the number one diagnostic tool ... to the number one ranking as a result.  More ... as the most complete and reliable method for clinical ... pain an MRI may confirm a suspected herniated disc ... entirely different treatment protocols.  In these circumstances, patients need ...
(Date:5/9/2017)... -- Oramed Pharmaceuticals Inc. (NASDAQ: ORMP ) ... on the development of oral drug delivery systems, ... has granted Oramed a patent titled, "Methods and ... covers Oramed,s invention of an oral glucagon-like peptide-1 ... hormone that stimulates the secretion of insulin from ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: