Navigation Links
MicroRNAs may be key to HIV's ability to hide, evade drugs, Jefferson scientists find
Date:9/30/2007

(PHILADELPHIA) Tiny pieces of genetic material called microRNA (miRNA), better known for its roles in cancer, could be a key to unlocking the secrets of how HIV, the AIDS virus, evades detection, hiding in the immune system. Researchers at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia have shown that when an individual infected with HIV receives a powerful cocktail of antiviral agents called HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy), the virus calls on miRNAs to help it remain quiet and practically undetectable, temporarily shutting down its ability to replicate and infect.

The work, which appears September 30, 2007 in an early online edition of the journal Nature Medicine, may also have implications for new treatment strategies against the virus. According to Hui Zhang, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, who led the work, if researchers can learn to manipulate miRNAs inhibitory effect on HIV, they might be able to devise strategies to bring the virus out of hiding, or latency, making it vulnerable to drugs and the bodys immune system.

While HAART can drive the number of HIV particles in the blood to practically undetectable levels, the virus is not eliminated. It hides in resting immune system CD4 T cells in the body, including the testis, brain, and other places. The drug combination has to be taken the rest of the patients life; if halted, the virus becomes active again.

HIV latency and how to eliminate the replication-competent and hidden virus are big problems, Dr. Zhang explains, noting that the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for latency are unclear.

Dr. Zhang, post-doctoral fellow Jialing Huang, Ph.D., and their colleagues may have come across one possible explanation. HIV, they have found, recruits cellular miRNA noncoding genetic material that has been shown to play a variety of roles in cancer and in biological regulation in resting T cells to control the translation of viral RNA into protein. This is the last step in the creation of HIV antigens, which make the virus visible to the immune system.

The team showed that a cluster of miRNAs bind to a certain location on the viral RNA, which in turn, blocks the creation of important proteins, and HIV replication. Resting CD4 T cells, they found, are enriched with more than the normal amount of these miRNAs compared to the activated T cells. When the researchers used antisense technology to block miRNA-caused viral inhibition, they found that the HIV again was active and able to replicate proving miRNAs critical role in maintaining latency.

While Dr. Zhang and his team continue to study how cellular miRNA contributes to latency, he notes that using miRNA inhibitors might become a kind of therapeutic approach to get the virus out of hiding, making it visible and a target for the immune system. Thats the next step, he says.


'/>"/>

Contact: Steve Benowitz
steven.benowitz@jefferson.edu
215-955-5291
Thomas Jefferson University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Role Of MicroRNAs In Angiogenesis Researched
2. MicroRNAs Can Be Tumor Suppressors
3. Mexico and US border attain a new outlook due to BiNational Sustainability Laboratory
4. Alcoholics are prone to disability
5. Hypertension drugs could lower Disability
6. Running delays disability in the aged
7. Restricted Activity Predicts Disability
8. Adding contrast improves ultrasounds ability to detect prostate cancer
9. CoQ10 bioavailability increased by Nanotechnology
10. Amputation may depend on availability of vascular surgeons
11. The growing availability of Fake drugs in the market
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... "FCPX editors can now reveal their media ... Pro X," said Christina Austin - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. , ProSlice ... X users can now reveal the media of their split screens with growing ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... N.J. (PRWEB) , ... June 27, 2016 , ... Quality ... sources, yet in many ways they remain in the eye of the beholder, according ... (EBO), a publication of The American Journal of Managed Care. For the full issue, ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... Orion, Clarkston, Michigan (PRWEB) , ... June 26, ... ... with respect to fertility once they have been diagnosed with endometriosis. These women ... intercourse but they also require a comprehensive approach that can help for preservation ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... , ... June 25, 2016 , ... First Choice ... States, named Dr. Sesan Ogunleye, as the Medical Director of its new Mesquite-Samuell Farm ... Medical Director of our new Mesquite location,” said Dr. James M. Muzzarelli, Executive Medical ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... A recent article ... people are unfamiliar with. The article goes on to state that individuals are now ... of these less common operations such as calf and cheek reduction. The Los Angeles ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of ... report to their offering. ... kidney failure, it replaces the function of kidneys by removing ... thus the treatment helps to keep the patient body,s electrolytes ... Increasing number of ESRD patients & substantial healthcare expenditure ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... INDIANAPOLIS , June 23, 2016 Roche ... received 510(k) clearance for its Elecsys BRAHMS PCT (procalcitonin) ... severe sepsis or septic shock. With this clearance, Roche ... provide a fully integrated solution for sepsis risk assessment ... associated with bacterial infection and PCT levels in blood ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 Bracket , ... launch its next generation clinical outcomes platform, Bracket eCOA (SM) ... held on June 26 – 30, 2016 in ... first electronic Clinical Outcome Assessment product of its kind to ... #715. Bracket eCOA 6.0 is a flexible platform ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: