Navigation Links
Methamphetamine abuse linked to underage sex, smoking and drinking
Date:11/18/2008

Teens who have never done drugs, but engage in other risky behaviours such as drinking, smoking and being sexually active, are more likely to use crystal meth, medical researchers at the University of Alberta have concluded. Among teens already doing other drugs, those with unstable family environments are most likely to do crystal meth, found the research team led by Dr. Terry Klassen, a professor in the Department of Pediatrics in the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry.

The researchers conducted an exhaustive search of the literature on methamphetamine use, and analyzed the results of a dozen studies to get a big-picture idea of factors at the individual, family and community level associated with crystal meth use among children and adolescents.

"If risk factors for MA use could be identified, physicians and other health-care professionals who work with youth may be better equipped to identify MA users, and develop education and prevention programs that could be targeted to youth at greater risk for using MA," Klassen said.

The U of A article was recently published in the medical journal BMC Pediatrics.

The researchers divided children and adolescents into two groups: "low-risk" (no previous drug use) and "high-risk" (history of drug use or time in a juvenile detention centre). There were some clear patterns of risk factors associated with crystal meth use, they said.

In the low-risk group, the U of A team also found that boys were more likely to try crystal meth than girls, and being homosexual or bisexual was also a risk factor.

But in the high-risk group, more girls than boys used crystal meth. In this group, drinking was not associated with methamphetamine use, but a family history of alcohol abuse was. Child abuse was not found to be significant factor.

Having certain psychiatric conditions was a risk factor for both groups. Because of the nature of the studies involved, the U of A researchers say they could not determine if these factors cause young people to use crystal meth, only that they are associated with abuse of this drug.

"This systematic review presents the best available evidence regarding factors for methamphetamine use among youth," Klassen said. "Engaging in high-risk behaviour may be a gateway for methamphetamine use or vice-versa." While many of the results might appear to be common sense, Klassen says there is always value in testing widely held beliefs or assumptions.

"You don't know beforehand whether a hypotheses will be proven or disproven," he noted. "If we didn't engage in these kinds of studies, we wouldn't know for sure."

The findings clearly indicate that health-care workers and counsellors "need to conduct a holistic assessment that includes psychiatric, lifestyle and family history," the U of A study concluded.

The research is intended for health-care professionals, but parents can learn from it as well. "When they start to see a cluster of (factors) that probably is a situation where they should be paying a lot more attention to their children. It may be more of a wake-up call," Klassen said.

The researchers scoured more than 40 databases for relevant academic articles and clinical trials, scientific journals, papers presented at scientific meetings, and so-called "grey literature" harder-to-find sources such as government reports on the topic, PhD theses, and so on. The team restricted its search English-language studies.

The initial search results yielded 2,376 potentially relevant studies. The researchers eventually narrowed down the results to 13 separate studies that fit the criteria of their review. Seven were done in North America and the rest in Asia. The majority were carried out within the last few years. Sample sizes ranged from 60 to 78,715.

Some findings from individual studies, highlighted by Klassen and his team:

Low-risk youth:

  • The fewer years of education that youth had, the more likely they were to use crystal meth.
  • Being sexually active was "significantly associated" with using crystal meth.
  • Youth who smoked, drank or used heroin and other opiates were more likely to try crystal meth.
  • When it came to mental health, low-risk youth with adjustment disorder, conduct disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity were much more likely to use crystal meth. However, oppositional defiance disorder, anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder and eating disorder were not significantly associated with crystal meth use in the low-risk group.
  • Being homosexual or bisexual, disruptive parenting, peers using meth and family history of drug use were other risk factors among young people who had never used drugs before.

High- risk youth:

  • "Strict parental monitoring was found to be protective for MA use among high-risk youth."
  • A family history of alcohol abuse, crime or drug abuse was associated with crystal meth use.
  • Receiving psychiatric treatment, more than two stints in a juvenile detention centre and a history of violence were "significantly associated" with crystal meth use.


'/>"/>

Contact: Meredith McLennan
meredith.mclennan@ualberta.ca
780-248-1320
University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Methamphetamine study suggests increased risk for HIV transmission
2. Partnership for a Drug-Free America and Colorado Springs Police Department Introduce Methamphetamine Prevention Program to Colorado Law Enforcement
3. Partnership for a Drug-Free America and Council Bluffs Police Department Introduce Methamphetamine Prevention Program to Iowa Law Enforcement
4. National Drug Intelligence Center Releases 2008 National Methamphetamine Threat Assessment
5. Use of Methamphetamine Among U.S. Workers and Job Applicants Drops 22 Percent in 2007 and Cocaine Use Slows Dramatically, Reports Quest Diagnostics
6. Methamphetamine Use Associated With Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Patients With Previously Unknown Risk Factors
7. Researchers Define Mechanism of Methamphetamine Addiction
8. Czech Republic to Host Historic First Global Conference on Methamphetamine
9. Hope for treating relapse to methamphetamine abuse
10. Disability payments may spur drug abuse
11. Leading Child Abuse Center Releases Back to School Tips to Protect Children From Internet Predators
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Leading pediatric oncology experts at Children’s National Health System ... Congress of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) Oct. 12-15. Chaired by ... and Blood Disorders at Children’s National, and Stephen P. Hunger, M.D., Chief of ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... of Michigan’s 2017 Best and Brightest in Wellness® by Best and Brightest. OnSite ... program on Friday, Oct. 20 from 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... 2017 , ... In the United States, single-family home owners ... New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Texas, Virginia, Connecticut, and California—the average is $7,000 ... property-tax rates, which contributes to the relatively lower cost of living in places ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... Washington, D.C. (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 ... ... Company, Cal Dining at the University of California Berkeley, and other leading institutions ... leverages the buying power of institutions to change the way animals are raised ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... its executive staff with the addition of industry sales leader, Thomas (Tom) Slott, ... develop the national distribution and sales network, direct the efforts of the surgical ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/25/2017)... 2017   Montrium , an industry leader ... the IQPC Trial Master Files & Inspection Readiness ... EastHORN Clinical Services has selected eTMF Connect ... management. EastHORN, a leading European contract research organization ... transparency to enable greater collaboration with sponsors, improve ...
(Date:9/22/2017)... Sept. 22, 2017 AVACEN Medical (AVACEN) announced ... now successfully helping those with the widespread pain associated ... diagnosed Amanda in Essex, England ... my hair, experiencing no sleep at all, tremendous pain, ... I cannot recommend [the AVACEN 100] enough, how this ...
(Date:9/18/2017)... R.I. , Sept. 18, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... the fields of bioinformatics and immune engineering, ... a protective avian influenza A (H7N9) vaccine. ... distantly related to seasonal influenza and presents ... rely on prior exposure to be effective. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: