Navigation Links
Message to the elderly: It's never too late to prevent illness!
Date:12/13/2007

NEW YORK (Dec. 13, 2007) -- A new study by a NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center physician-scientist has an important message for the elderly: It's not too late to improve your health through diet and exercise, even if you've had an unhealthy lifestyle in the past!

Published in the November issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the report surveyed scientific literature and found that adults, 65 and older, can have significant health improvements with simple and realistic lifestyle changes. It found that risk can be reduced for many diseases -- including obesity, cancer, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis.

"I think this is an extremely important and positive message," says the paper's lead symposium editor, Dr. Richard S. Rivlin, professor of medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College and attending physician at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell. "Many elderly people feel that it is too late for them to improve their health, but that is simply not true."

Dr. Rivlin analyzed how the elderly can ward off risks to their health late in life by improving body composition -- lowering fat and boosting muscle mass. Adhering to a low-calorie and low-fat diet -- high in vegetables and fruits -- with a regular exercise plan, can help the elderly stave off the diseases of aging.

"When measures to combat chronic disease are started in one's 60s and 70s, there are still definite benefits," says Dr. Rivlin. "But older adults must realize that there is no quick fix. They must change their lifestyles."

Specific findings:

  • Lowering high blood pressure or hypertension -- a major risk for cardiovascular disease -- through improved diet and exercise had more dramatic health benefits for the elderly than for any other age group. Control of hypertension could potentially prevent one-fifth of coronary heart disease cases in men, and 30 percent in women.

  • Older adults who adhered to a low-calorie diet with regular exercise had lower rates of cancer. In one study, risk was reduced by nearly 50 percent.

  • Benefits of weight training include increased ability to burn calories and prevention of osteoporosis.

  • Calcium and vitamin D supplements for seniors helped slow rates of bone loss and reduce the number of bone fractures.

"Our study reviews and presents the most up-to-date information showing the influence a healthy lifestyle may have on cardiovascular disease, cancer and osteoporosis," says Dr. Rivlin. "I also believe that the risk for other diseases, like diabetes and pulmonary disease, can also be avoided through later intervention. But, the earlier, the better."


'/>"/>

Contact: Andrew Klein
ank2017@med.cornell.edu
212-821-0560
New York- Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center/Weill Cornell Medical College
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Nurses Send Sutter a Clear Message
2. Message for Activists at Latino National Congreso Convention: Amnesty Will Exacerbate National Problems and Turn the U.S. into Another Mexico
3. Hearing messages embedded in noise could be early sign of schizophrenia
4. New telomere discovery could help explain why cancer cells never stop dividing
5. Bodys Clock Never Adjusts to Daylight Savings Time
6. Breast cancer prevention practices vary across Canada
7. Blood-flow detector software show promise in preventing brain damage
8. Red wine compound shown to prevent prostate cancer
9. School-based overweight prevention program may cut risk of eating disorders among girls
10. Avocados may help prevent oral cancer, OSU study shows
11. Meth Project Advertisements Selected for National Prevention Campaign
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/24/2017)... ... April 24, 2017 , ... As part of the nationwide Days of Remembrance ... of the Holocaust and Nazi persecution, Center for Medicine after the Holocaust (CMATH) ... CMATH Champions trip to Germany and Poland next week. , The Fourth Biennial CMATH ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... Antonio, TX (PRWEB) , ... April 24, 2017 , ... ... by the glitterati, those unreal icons inhabiting the rarified air of pop and film ... the paparazzi and anyone snapping pictures: the smile. Grins now run the gamut from ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... ... April 24, 2017 , ... The California Dental Association Foundation’s two-day volunteer ... to 1,961 people during the April 22-23 event at the San Mateo Event Center. ... experience barriers to care, CDA Cares educates the public and policymakers about the importance ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... ... April 24, 2017 , ... Veteran Theresa James awoke to the sound of ... , In “Healing Tears,” James depicts every parent’s worst nightmare, when her three children ... journaling conversations and situations throughout my divorce,” James said. “After the death of my ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... ... April 24, 2017 , ... ALP ... food supplements, announced its popular products are now available for purchase on StackedNutrition.com, ... prioritizes the use of premium natural ingredients in making all of its products. ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/18/2017)... 18, 2017  Cardinal Health (NYSE: CAH ... 2017 earnings per share (EPS) guidance and providing a ... in conjunction with this morning,s announcement of the planned ... Nutritional Insufficiency businesses. Cardinal Health now believes ... be at the bottom of its previous guidance range ...
(Date:4/18/2017)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Global ... ... at a CAGR of 6.35% during the period 2017-2021. ... based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts. ... the coming years. The report also includes a discussion of the ...
(Date:4/18/2017)... Calif. , April 18, 2017  Socionext ... of collaboration started in 2016, in which Socionext ... Brain SOINN". The companies achieved initial results in ... solution by Artificial Brain SOINN. The results will ... Big Sight, April 19-21, at booths 4505 & ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: