Navigation Links
Men in low income neighborhoods drink more than women: Study
Date:3/3/2011

TORONTO, On March 3, 2011 Men living in low-income neighbourhoods consume more than three times as many alcoholic drinks each week compared to women in these neighbourhoods, according to a study led by St. Michael's researcher Flora Matheson.

The findings, published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, suggest neighbourhood affluence affects men and women differently when it comes to alcohol consumption. Heavy drinking is associated with higher death rates and a greater risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, cancer and liver cirrhosis.

"While research has shown men are more susceptible to drinking than women, our study has found a large gap in drinking patterns between men and women and among men depending on where they live," Flora Matheson says. "Surprisingly, where a women lives really doesn't impact her tendency to drink."

Researchers found no real difference in drinking patterns among women despite whether they live in a low income or affluent neighbourhood. On average, women in low-income neighbourhoods drank 2.6 drinks each week versus women in affluent neighbourhoods who drank 2.2 drinks each week. Conversely, researchers found a large difference in drinking patterns among men. According to the study, men in low-income neighbourhoods drank 8.5 drinks weekly compared to men in wealthy neighbourhoods who drank 4.5 drinks weekly.

"Alcohol abuse is a major problem in our society and a large burden on the health system," said Dr. Rick Glazier, a family physicians at St. Michael's and one of the study's authors. "The number of drinks per week in this study look to be moderate but they likely reflect important patterns that include problem drinking."

Scientific research suggests the consumption gap between genders may have something to do with aspects of the environment that promote heavy drinking as well as how men and women deal with stress. For example, if you live in a neighbourhood culture that promotes and supports heavier alcohol use then you might be influenced to drink more. Other research suggests that low-income communities are more likely to support a substance use or abuse culture. Men also tend to externalize stress by drinking while women tend to internalize stress in the form of depression or anxiety.

The study recommends community and health services consider neighbourhood influences on drinking patterns among men when providing prevention and treatment programs. Strategies incorporating gender considerations can help relieve the burden of illness, the researchers say.


'/>"/>

Contact: Julie Saccone
sacconej@smh.ca
416-864-5047
St. Michael's Hospital
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. PA Breast Cancer Coalition Launches Income Tax Refund Campaign
2. Guardian Brings Income Protection to New Level with Student Loan Protection Program
3. Universal Health Realty Income Trust Reports 2009 Fourth Quarter and Full Year Financial Results
4. Unilens Vision Reports Record Second Quarter Earnings And Royalty Income
5. K-State Study Finds Abundance of Food Stores, Not Lack of Them, Puts Low-Income Women In Small Cities at Higher Risk of Obesity
6. Study: Kidney disease a big risk for younger, low-income minorities
7. Case managers help low-income women receive more timely breast cancer diagnosis
8. Retirement Options Shares Tips for Retiring Happy Regardless of Income
9. Pediatricians find link between cumulative hardships and health in low-income young children
10. Little Known Proven Strategy to Increase Retirement Income by 25% or More to Be Revealed in Free Webinar Thursday, June 24
11. Counseling increased mammography use among low-income women with health insurance
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Conventional wisdom preaches the benefits of moderation, whether it’s a ... the bar too high can result in disappointment, perhaps even self-loathing. However, those who ... , Research from PsychTests.com reveals that behind the tendency to set ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... June 19, ... the dangers associated with chronic pain and the benefits of holistic treatments, Serenity ... who are suffering with Sickle Cell Disease. , Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is a ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... 24, 2016 , ... Global law firm Greenberg Traurig, P.A. announced that 20 ... by their peers for this recognition are considered among the top 2 percent of ... honors as members of this year’s Legal Elite Hall of Fame: Miami Shareholders ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Topical BioMedics, Inc, makers of Topricin and MyPainAway Pain ... for a minimum wage raise to $12 an hour by 2020 and then adjusting it ... the lost value of the minimum wage, assure the wage floor does not erode again, ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... The Haute ... Dr. Barry M. Weintraub as a prominent plastic surgeon and the network’s newest ... world, and the most handsome men, look naturally attractive. Plastic surgery should be ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... 2016  Consumers have taken a more active ... more emphasis on patient outcomes. ... the pharmaceutical industry have evolved beyond just providing ... are focusing on becoming more patient-oriented across their ... services that improve health. ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... 2016 Research and Markets ... Electronics 2015-2025: Applications, Technologies, Forecasts" report to ... In-Mold Electronics, Smart Skin, Structural Health Monitoring, Composite ... Structural electronics involves electronic and/or electrical components and ... dumb structures such as vehicle bodies or conformally ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... -- According to a new market research ... Safety Pen Needles), Needle Length (4mm, 5mm, 6mm, 8mm, ... Purchase (Retail, Non-Retail) - Trends & Global Forecasts to ... for the forecast period of 2016 to 2021. This ... 2021 from USD 1.65 Billion in 2016, growing at ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: