Navigation Links
Mediterranean Diet Aids the Aging Brain: Study
Date:2/10/2009

Eating plan seems to reduce the risk of cognitive impairment, dementia

TUESDAY, Feb. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Chalk up another endorsement for the so-called Mediterranean diet: The eating regimen, which is rich in fruits, vegetables, fish and olive oil, may help the brain stay sharp into old age, a new study suggests.

Following the healthful diet reduced the risk of getting mild cognitive impairment -- marked by forgetfulness and difficulty concentrating. And it also cut the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease if cognitive impairment was already present, said study lead author Dr. Nikolaos Scarmeas, an assistant professor of neurology at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City.

"We did two different types of analysis," Scarmeas said of the study, published in the February issue of Archives of Neurology.

Previous research has found that people who follow the Mediterranean are at less risk of developing a variety of diseases besides Alzheimer's, including heart disease, cancer and Parkinson's.

The Columbia researchers began the study by evaluating almost 1,400 people without cognitive impairment and 482 people with mild cognitive impairment, and then followed them for an average of 4.5 years. The participants -- average age 77 -- also completed a food frequency questionnaire, detailing what they had eaten during the past year.

The researchers divided the participants into three groups -- those who adhered somewhat or not at all to the Mediterranean diet, those who adhered moderately to it, and those who adhered regularly. Then they evaluated the participants' cognitive functioning.

They found that the diet helped in both cases -- preventing mild cognitive impairment and also the risk of further decline, even if people weren't entirely strict in their adherence to the diet.

"As compared to the group that ate very little or not at all of the Mediterranean diet, those who ate it to a moderate degree had 17 percent less risk of developing mild cognitive impairment," Scarmeas said. "Those who adhered a lot had a 28 percent less risk of developing mild cognitive impairment."

The diet also helped those who already had mild impairment. "Compared to those who adhered not at all or very little, those who ate the Mediterranean diet to a moderate degree had a 45 percent reduction in risk going from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease. Those who adhered a lot had a 48 percent reduction in risk of going from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's," he said.

Scarmeas said previous research he's carried out found that a greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated with a lower risk of Alzheimer's disease.

It's not known exactly how the diet may help keep the brain healthy, Scarmeas said. One possibility is that it might reduce inflammation, which plays a role in brain disease. Or it might work by improving cardiovascular risk factors such as high cholesterol, he said.

Two experts who reviewed the study put their perspective on the findings.

"You see what is called a dose response. The more stringently you follow the Mediterranean diet, the better the outcome," noted Dr. Gary Kennedy, director of geriatric psychiatry at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City.

Alice Lichtenstein, Gershoff Professor of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University in Boston, said: "It's encouraging to see the results -- those reporting the healthier dietary pattern seem to do better." What remains to be seen, she added, is whether it was the specific diet that helped people avoid cognitive decline or if those people who ate properly had other healthy habits that decreased their risk.

All three experts agreed: Until more evidence is in that the Mediterranean diet keeps brains sharp, there are plenty of other reasons to follow it, including heart health.

More information

To learn more about the Mediterranean diet, visit the Women's Heart Foundation.



SOURCES: Nikolaos Scarmeas, M.D., assistant professor, neurology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York City; Alice Lichtenstein, D.Sc., Gershoff Professor of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston; Gary Kennedy, M.D., director, geriatric psychiatry, Montefiore Medical Center, New York City; February 2009, Archives of Neurology


'/>"/>
Copyright©2009 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Dr. Will Clower To Lead Mediterranean Immersion
2. EAU 2nd Eastern Mediterranean Meeting expected to highlight cystectomy
3. Mediterranean-Style Diet Best for Blood Sugar Control
4. Mediterranean Diet Enriched With Nuts Cuts Heart Risks
5. Mediterranean Diet May Ward Off Type 2 Diabetes
6. Scientists obtain anticancer medicines from the elecampe, a wild plant growing in the Mediterranean
7. Healthful Mediterranean Dining Never Tasted So Good
8. Mediterranean Diet for Mom Fends Off Asthma, Allergies in Kids
9. Medtronic Mediterranean Launches Worlds First Arabic-Language Integrated Insulin Therapy for Improved Diabetes Management
10. Mediterranean Diet May Boost Alzheimers Survival
11. Dilon Technologies Leads Molecular Breast Imaging Expansion
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Mediterranean Diet Aids the Aging Brain: Study
(Date:1/22/2017)... , ... January 22, 2017 , ... Medical lab ... results. Often the results of a simple test will take days to arrive to ... Test Now offers customers direct access to their lab tests, bypassing the cost and ...
(Date:1/21/2017)... ... January 21, 2017 , ... Salveo for life, a ... bringing its product to the United States as part of its presence to expand ... years, Alcovit aims to reduce the productions of nasty toxins as a result of ...
(Date:1/21/2017)... ... January 21, 2017 , ... Seamild, the largest manufacturer of oats in China, ... owner and founder. As Oat is recognized globally as one of the healthiest cereals, ... he believes it is a move to sow the seed of good karma. Buddhism ...
(Date:1/21/2017)... ... January 21, 2017 , ... Pacifica ... Travis-Teague, the electrifying line-up of events for its annual meeting “Coming Home 2017,” ... community. “Coming Home 2017” will be held on Friday January 27 through ...
(Date:1/21/2017)... ... January 21, 2017 , ... ... medical office in Petaluma, located at 167 Lynch Creek Way. The Petaluma office ... SRO sports medicine and rehabilitation services and on-site x-ray services. Two multi-specialist ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/19/2017)... 19, 2017 Report Details ... Alzheimer,s Disease ... Companies – our new study reveals trends, R&D progress, ... events affecting the Alzheimer,s disease therapeutics and diagnostics market. ... key questions: - How is the Alzheimer,s disease therapeutics ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... Jan. 19, 2017  Stealth BioTherapeutics Inc. ( Stealth ... mitochondrial dysfunction, today announced new additions to its senior ... Chief Medical Officer, and Daniel Geffken as ... Jim Carr , Pharm.D. has been promoted to ... pleased to welcome Doug and Daniel to our management ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... , Jan. 19, 2017 Accuray Incorporated (Nasdaq: ... and TomoTherapy® Systems continue to set the bar for ... highest composite overall user satisfaction rating among radiation treatment ... 2016 MD Buyline Market Intelligence Briefing™. The most recent ... composite ratings among industry peers for 11 of the ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: