Navigation Links
Medical Tattoo Tracks Body Functions
Date:8/11/2011

By Amanda Gardner
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- An invisible patch placed on the skin much like a temporary tattoo can pick up and transmit physiological signals such as heart rate, brain waves and muscle activity.

This new advance in "wearable electronics" might one day replace the bulky wires and electrodes that are routinely used to assess body functions.

"I can't feel its presence," said John Rogers, senior author of a paper on the patch published in the Aug. 12 issue of Science, who demonstrated the two-inch-square device on his forearm during a Wednesday teleconference. "The distinction between electronics and the skin is blurred. It's much like a temporary transfer tattoo, though this has high-quality electronics embedded."

The epidermal electronic system (EES) improves on existing products and processes, many of them borrowed from Silicon Valley and the semiconductor industry.

To make the patch, the researchers first sliced a silicone wafer so thin that it became flexible and floppy like the tissue of the human body, explained Rogers, who is Lee J. Flory Founder Chair in Engineering Innovation at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

The wafers were then cut into serpentine shapes so they could also be pulled, stretched and elongated, again to match human biology, then shaped into circuits and bonded to a soft sheet of silicone rubber.

The system is less than the diameter of a human hair.

"We borrowed ideas from the temporary tattoo industry and used a flexible plastic backing that can wash away later," he said.

It also attaches like a temporary tattoo, requiring no separate adhesives or gels. "You [put] it on your skin then just apply water to the backside," Rogers said. "The entire system can have properties similar to the epidermis."

Unlike human skin, though, the EES includes tiny sensors, transmitters and receivers as well as photodetectors, radio frequency indictors and electrophysiological and temperature sensors.

Rogers described a multitude of potential applications.

"These devices are essentially invisible to the person who's wearing them so they can be very easily used for monitoring sleep without disrupting sleep patterns or to monitor premature babies, all kinds of scenarios where adhesive tape and wires are just not suitable," he said.

The system also recognizes words and connects them with muscle movement, which allows the person to speak simple words such as "up," "down," "left" or "right" to direct a computer game.

"This foreshadows the use of technology in more advanced types of human-machine interface -- perhaps most compelling is control of prosthetics," Rogers said.

The same principles could also help people who are limited because of neurological disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to communicate.

The EES might also form the basis of a "smart" Band-Aid in the future, by using electrical stimulation to accelerate wound healing.

The EES has an antenna, so it is functional. The researchers' next challenge is make all the different elements work as a coherent system, to add Wi-Fi and to figure out the best power sources, such as batteries, wireless coils and solar cells.

"This is not [yet] a fully integrated system with all the bells and whistles we hope to achieve. The story doesn't end here," Rogers said.

"The ultimate goal is to generate commercial products that can be of broad benefit to society," he added. "This paper is a starting point."

Rogers has co-founded a company called mc10, which intends to do exactly that and, he predicts, at reasonable cost.

The company already has a joint development program with Reebok to "introduce these sorts of ideas in sportswear. That's targeted for a product that could launch very soon," Rogers said.

This research was supported in part by the Air Force Research Laboratory and the National Science Foundation.

More information

The American Society of Biomechanics has more on how biology and engineering can work together.

SOURCES: Aug. 10, 2011, teleconference with: John Rogers, Ph.D., Lee J. Flory Founder Chair in Engineering Innovation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Aug. 12, 2011, Science


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Dale Browne, M.D., ear, nose, and throat specialist, receives award from National Medical Society
2. John House, MD, ear, nose, and throat specialist, receives award from National Medical Society
3. Academics guest authoring ghostwritten medical journal articles should be charged with fraud
4. School obesity-prevention curriculum can reduce medical costs
5. Report Urges New Review System for Medical Devices
6. ACR and SBI issue statement on British Medical Journal article on effect of mammography on breast cancer death rates
7. University Hospitals Case Medical Center to begin clinical trial on experimental anti-TB drug
8. FDA should invest in developing a new regulatory framework to replace flawed 510(k) medical device clearance process
9. Afghan Medical Staff Face Ongoing Security Threats: Study
10. Health-care reform must involve psychologists, medical providers, educate patients
11. Fewer Surgical Errors Reported at VA Medical Facilities
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Medical Tattoo Tracks Body Functions
(Date:5/28/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... May 28, 2016 , ... In a part of the city where’s ... city’s new farm-to-table Kelowna restaurants is hoping to attract diners with a taste ... & Suites officially opened the doors to Cornerstone Grill, an urban casual restaurant focusing ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... , ... An influential resource amongst nurses and professionals in the health care ... variety of topics detailing why we appreciate nurses in so many different ways. From ... from being in a major recession to one of the hottest growing professions in ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... , ... Beleza Medspa has initiated a new program to assist ... first time that Coolsculpting is being used for for more than just cosmetic purposes. ... meet the prescribed body-fat standard, measured by the circumference-based tape method. The tape-test ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... Despite last week’s media reports hinting at ... company to wait until March 2017 for an interest rate increase, according to Rajeev ... of Business. , “The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) dot charts are of interest ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... 26, 2016 , ... Georgia State University College of Law ... , Answering to the increasing demand for curricular specializations, the Certificate in Intellectual ... and land use law. ,  , “The demand for lawyers with specific knowledge ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/24/2016)... 2016  NxStage Medical, Inc. (Nasdaq: NXTM ... renal care, today announced that Jeffrey H. Burbank ... following schedule of investor conferences. Where applicable, a webcast ... http://ir.nxstage.com/ .   ... NY           Friday, June 10, 2016 1:30 p.m. ET ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... , May 24, 2016  Joe Marziani has joined VMS BioMarketing as senior ... executive officer, today. In his new role, Marziani will lead the company,s business development ... professionals to improve outcomes. Photo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160523/371089 ... ... ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... 2016 Los innovadores de ... mundo, introduce catéteres para la intervención de extremidades ... compañía global especializada en el suministro de soluciones ... cartera incluyendo productos para tratar la enfermedad arterial ... son los dispositivos de primera entrada de la ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: