Navigation Links
Medical College of Wisconsin researchers identify proteins that help develop mammalian hearts
Date:5/16/2008

The absence of two proteins in mammalian embryos prevents the development of a healthy heart, a new study by researchers at the Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, has found.

The study, which appears in the May 15 issue of Developmental Biology, was led by Stephen Duncan, Ph.D., professor of cell biology, neurobiology and anatomy at the Medical College.

This is the first study that has successfully identified the factors responsible for the onset of heart formation in the mammalian embryo. Until now, no single mutation had been identified that was thought to be responsible for blocking proper development of the heart in mammalian embryos. The identification of these major developmental switches will allow researchers to unravel the fundamental mechanisms that define heart cell formation.

Understanding the molecular pathways that control the development of the heart has been the subject of much interest in the scientific community, as approximately 35,000 children are born in the United States each year with congenital heart defects. Many more die during gestation because of complications from improper heart development.

Defining these molecular pathways has implications in the production of heart cells from stem cells, said Dr. Duncan. Our study suggests that mutations in GATA4 and GATA6 are likely contributors to the development of congenital heart disease in children. Indeed other investigators at our Medical College, as well as elsewhere, have found mutations in one of the genes from our study in children born with heart abnormalities.

Dr. Duncans lab found that either of two proteins, GATA4 and GATA6, controls the expression of genes that tell early embryonic cells to start making other proteins that eventually become beating heart cells.

When either GATA4 or GATA6 were present, the stem cells were able to make most of the proteins that are required for heart function suggesting that they act in a redundant manner, Dr. Duncan said. However, when both GATA4 and GATA6 genes were mutated, the embryonic stem cells were unable to form heart cells in the lab.

The study observed how the absence or mutation of GATA4 and GATA6 proteins impacted heart development in mice embryos. The embryos were cloned from GATA4 and GATA6 deficient stem cells.

When embryos were cloned from normal stem cells, they made normal beating hearts, Dr. Duncan explained. However, when embryos were cloned from the GATA4/GATA6 deficient stem cells, the embryos developed but were completely lacking all heart cells.


'/>"/>

Contact: Toranj Marphetia
toranj@mcw.edu
414-456-4744
Medical College of Wisconsin
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Select Medical Corporation Announces Results for First Quarter Ended March 31, 2008
2. The 2008 AMIA Spring Congress to Showcase Best Practices and Innovations in Biomedical and Health Informatics Research and Education
3. Americans must consider cost and effectiveness when comparing and choosing medical interventions
4. AGA Medical Corporation Receives CE Mark Approval for the AMPLATZER(R) Vascular Plug III
5. Nonin(R) Medical Pioneers First Interoperable, Wireless Fingertip Pulse Oximeter
6. CRH Medical Corporation opens Center in New York
7. Mindray Medical Completes Acquisition of Datascopes Patient Monitoring Business
8. RNC RESPONSE TO OBAMA COMMENTS ON MEDICAL MARIJUANA LAWS
9. LMS Medical Sees Fiscal 2008 Revenue Jump 72% Over F07 - Q4/F08 Revenue Hits New Record
10. UNICEF Rushing Medical Supplies, Tents, Clean Water to Children Affected by Powerful Earthquake in China
11. Milliman Says 2008 Medical Cost for American Family of Four Exceeds $15,600
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/23/2017)... ... 23, 2017 , ... ChenMed, a privately owned medical, management ... strategic executive team expansion needed to further optimize growth and performance. , “We ... Christopher Chen, MD, ChenMed Chief Executive Officer. “George Wheeler and Donald Trexler ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Sharon Kleyne, host of the nationally syndicated radio program, The ... recently talked on her program about how she is looking forward to World Water ... an important distinction. World Water Day, Kleyne pointed out, is an occasion for looking ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) , ... March 23, 2017 , ... ... half of all Americans, yet poor sleep is likely not the only cause of ... these undesirable characteristics that make you look older or in poor health are likely ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... ... March 23, 2017 , ... Natural Subsistence, a ... of people’s health and nutrition, announced its product Leyzene is now available for ... develops nutritional supplements that help people improve all aspects of their health so ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... Square, PA (PRWEB) , ... March 23, 2017 , ... ... days. That means many students are thinking about summer internships , which can ... lack thereof). , The pros at Garden Media Group, a boutique public relations firm ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/23/2017)... 23, 2017 Global Colposcope Market by Manufacturers, ... Colposcope in Global market, especially in North America ... , South America , Middle East ... the market based on manufacturers, regions, type and application. ... Browse 190 Tables and Figures, ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... March 23, 2017   Casetabs , the pioneer ... mobile app for the iPhone. With this new release, ... and communication for physician offices, ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) ... offers iPhone users even faster, more reliable access to ... even easier to connect care teams so that surgeries ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... , March 23, 2017 ReNeuron ... its CTX cells in chronic stroke patients, despite not meeting ... primary outcome measure, the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT). As ... to a pivotal controlled clinical study in 2017. Beyond CTX, ... (RP) trial in 2017 and Phase I data from its ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: