Navigation Links
Matching Heart Donors by Race Unnecessary?
Date:6/1/2010

Death rates higher among black recipients, but ethnicity of donor made no difference, study shows

TUESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- A constellation of factors -- including flaws in the health care system, insurance and education levels and biological differences between the races -- may explain why blacks often do worse than whites after undergoing heart transplants, a new study suggests.

The researchers also found that the race of the person who donated the heart doesn't affect whether the person receiving it will fare better or worse after the transplant, according to the report published online June 1 in the Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

"It does not matter whether a white, black, Hispanic or Asian donor heart is transplanted into a patient of any other particular race," senior study investigator and Johns Hopkins transplant surgeon Dr. Ashish Shah said in a news release. "Other factors must be the reason for any differences in how well people do after transplantation, in particular why blacks have poorer outcomes."

Shah and colleagues examined more than 20,000 medical records of patients who received heart transplants in North America between 1997 and 2007. They found that matching donor hearts by race -- transplanting hearts into patients of the same ethnic group as the donor -- made no difference in the life span of recipients.

Thirty-five percent of the black recipients died after five years, regardless of the race of the person who donated the heart. For white and Hispanic recipients, the death rates were 26 and 28 percent, respectively. There weren't enough Asians included in the study to provide valid percentages for this group.

"This problem is not just about biology or race, it is also about the health system that supports our patients," Shah said, noting that patients with public insurance had a higher risk of dying than those with private insurance.

More information

For more on heart transplants, try the U.S. National Library of Medicine.



-- Randy Dotinga



SOURCE: Johns Hopkins Medicine, news release, May 31, 2010


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Infosolve Technologies Demonstrates OpenDQ's Massively Scalable Fuzzy Matching Capabilities on a Cloud Platform
2. Matching Tumor Types to Drugs Boosts Lung Cancer Outcomes
3. Mercy Primary Care Center Receives $15,000 in Matching Grants for Diabetes Management Program
4. Lack of private insurance contribute to higher deaths among black heart transplant patients
5. Potential New Source of Stem Cells for Heart Repair
6. Laser Used to Blast Away Cells Causing Irregular Heartbeat
7. Toothbrushing May Stave Off Heart Woes
8. Henry Ford Hospital study: Fewer infections with new heart-pump implant
9. Henry Ford Hospital: New left-side heart pump improves right-side heart function
10. Ground-breaking study to improve quality of life and outcomes for kids born with heart defect
11. In infant heart surgery, newer technique yields better survival in first year of life
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/27/2016)... ... June 27, 2016 , ... ... professionals, announced today its affiliation with Tennessee Counseling Association. This new ... network of the Tennessee Counseling Association, adding exclusive benefits and promotional offers. , ...
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... ... On June 10-11, 2016, A Forever Recovery, a holistic treatment center for ... Table in Battle Creek, MI, where the rehabilitation facility is located. This annual celebration ... world’s leading providers of cereal and other breakfast foods. Its residents often refer to ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... Experts from the American ... Annual Research Meeting June 26-28, 2016, at the Hynes Convention Center in Boston. ... including advance care planning, healthcare costs and patient and family engagement. , AIR ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... 25, 2016 , ... As a lifelong Southern Californian, Dr. Omkar Marathe earned ... the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He trained in Internal Medicine at ... fellowship in hematology/oncology at the UCLA-Olive View-Cedars Sinai program where he had the opportunity ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... , ... Those who have experienced traumatic events may suffer from a complex ... as drug or alcohol abuse, as a coping mechanism. To avoid this pain and ... a traumatic event. , Trauma sufferers tend to feel a range of emotions, from ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... , June 24, 2016   Bay Area ... Network,s Dean Center for Tick Borne Illness ... and Rehabilitation, MIT Hacking Medicine, University of California, ... today announced the five finalists of Lyme ... disease.  More than 100 scientists, clinicians, researchers, entrepreneurs, ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... , June 24, 2016 ... of the "Structural Electronics 2015-2025: Applications, Technologies, ... In-Mold Electronics, Smart Skin, ... Photovoltaics Structural electronics involves electronic ... load-bearing, protective structures, replacing dumb structures such as ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... Dehaier Medical Systems Ltd. (NASDAQ: DHRM ) ... medical devices and wearable sleep respiratory products in ... with Hongyuan Supply Chain Management Co., Ltd. (hereinafter referred ... to develop Dehaier,s new Internet medical technology business. ... Hongyuan Supply Chain,s sales platform to reach Dehaier,s dealers ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: