Navigation Links
Many Women Can Have Cervical Cancer Test Every 3 Years: Study
Date:5/19/2011

By Amanda Gardner
HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Women 30 and older who have good results from each of the two cervical cancer tests available today can safely wait three years for their next screening instead of just one year, according to new research.

The finding is not likely be controversial, said Dr. Charles Capen, chief of gynecology/oncology at Scott & White Healthcare in Temple, Texas, given that most current guidelines already recommend that women 30 and over who are otherwise healthy be screened with both a Pap smear and a test for a virus linked to cervical cancer every three years as long as the initial tests are both negative.

Unlike some cancers, cervical cancer is usually slow-growing, and it is curable if detected early, according to the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

"This [new research] confirms the latest guidelines," agreed Dr. Therese Bevers, medical director of the Cancer Prevention Center at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. "That is fabulous as it can give clinicians and women everywhere a lot of reassurance."

Hopefully, it will also spur more doctors to actually follow these guidelines, added Bevers, as recent research has revealed that most doctors are giving the Pap test more often than recommended -- i.e., once a year.

The study findings will be presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology being held in June in Chicago. The results were released early Wednesday during a teleconference.

Cervical cancer risk can be assessed by two different tests: the traditional Pap smear, which searches for abnormalities in cervical cells, and a newer test that can detect DNA of the virus that causes most cases of cervical cancer: human papillomavirus, or HPV. That screening is referred to as the HPV test.

The new study involved more than 330,000 women enrolled in a large northern California health plan who were undergoing both types of tests between 2003 and 2005 and who were followed for five years after being tested.

The estimated five-year risk for developing cervical cancer was 7.5 per 100,000 women in those who had normal Pap smears, versus a much lower 3.8 per 100,000 for women who were negative on the HPV test.

When the two tests were performed together with both yielding negative results, the estimated risk was 3.2 per 100,000 women, meaning that the HPV test alone is almost as good as the two combined.

"A single negative HPV test [predicted] an extremely low cancer risk for women [which] was not appreciably lowered by having a normal Pap test," said lead author Hormuzd Katki, principal investigator in the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics at the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

That means that women who test negative on the HPV test alone might be able to extend their screening intervals to three years with no adverse consequences, Katki added.

"This generates the question, should HPV testing become the standard at some point," Bevers said.

This might be especially important in developing countries that often don't have the capability to interpret Pap tests, Bevers said.

"HPV testing is much easier," she added. "It's kind of like doing a pregnancy test at home. It's positive or negative."

There is still a role, however, for the Pap test -- to follow up a positive HPV test, said Katki. "The Pap test can identify women who have more immediate disease," he said.

"But many women equate a Pap smear with their annual gynecological exam and one of the arguments against three-year screening intervals is that women would no longer see their doctor every year and get other necessary tests, such as blood pressure, cholesterol and testing for sexually transmitted infections," Capen said.

Capen, though, thinks that won't happen. "Young women may be on the pill or they may be pregnant, so hopefully they will still get the medical care they need," he said.

Since the study findings are to be presented at a medical meeting, they should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

There's more on cervical cancer screening at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

SOURCES: Charles Capen, M.D., chief of gynecology/oncology, Scott & White Healthcare, Temple, Texas; Therese Bevers, M.D., medical director, Cancer Prevention Center, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston; May 18, 2011, teleconference with Hormuzd Katki, Ph.D., principal investigator, division of cancer epidemiology and genetics, U.S. National Cancer Institute; U.S. National Cancer Institute study abstract, May 18, 2011


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Exercise helps women fight smoking cravings, but effect is short-lived
2. New commitments to save women and children
3. Smoking Raises Odds for Cancer in Women Already at High Risk
4. Recurring cancers in women with a history of breast cancer differ from the original tumors
5. Are Affluent Women More Apt to Choose C-Section?
6. Abortions generate $95 million a year for Polish doctors as women use illegal private sector
7. EMAS publishes position statement about the post-reproductive health of women
8. Women & Infants receives support from CVS Caremark Charitable Trust
9. Gene variation linked to infertility in women, study finds
10. For Some Women, Knowing About Heart Failure Spurs Worry
11. Health reform law will insure nearly all uninsured women by 2014
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Many Women Can Have Cervical Cancer Test Every 3 Years: Study 
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... The American Board of Family Medicine's (ABFM) ... and Chief Executive Officer, succeeding Dr. James C. Puffer upon his retirement. Dr. Newton ... until Dr. Puffer’s retirement at the end of 2018. Upon assuming the role of ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... ... Apple Rehab Shelton Lakes , which specializes in the delivery of sub-acute ... of a disaster drill on October 3rd. , Apple Rehab participated with the Shelton ... well as the Connecticut Long Term Care Mutual Aid Plan (LTC-MAP). The LTC-MAP ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... Texas (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... Yisrayl ... this week that explains one of the most popular and least understood books in ... like cryptic and puzzling descriptions that have baffled scholars for centuries. Many have tossed ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... services for healthcare compliance program management, will showcase a range of technology and ... for Assisted Living (NCAL) Convention and Expo to be held October 14–18, 2017 ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... 2017 , ... The American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI) will present the ... Opening Session of AMIA’s Annual Symposium in Washington, D.C. AMIA’s Annual Symposium ... a pioneer in the field of medical informatics, this prestigious award is presented to ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/28/2017)... Sept. 28, 2017 Cohen Veterans Bioscience and ... use of wearable and home sensors for real-time monitoring ... Signal Foundation, a nonprofit organization focused on disruptive health ... an affordable analytical system to record and integrate behavioral, ... ...
(Date:9/25/2017)... PROVIDENCE, R.I. , Sept. 25, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... immunogenicity assessment, vaccine design, and immune-engineering today announced ... focused on the development of personalized therapeutic cancer ... and has provided exclusive access to enabling technologies ... MSc Eng., MBA will lead EpiVax Oncology as ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... HistoSonics, Inc., a venture-backed medical device company developing a non-invasive, robotically assisted, platform ... leadership team developments today:   ... ... Tom Tefft ... Veteran medical device executive Josh Stopek , PhD, who has led ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: