Navigation Links
Many Ovarian Cancer Patients Denied By-the-Book Care, Study Says
Date:3/12/2013

By Kathleen Doheny
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, March 11 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly two-thirds of ovarian cancer patients don't receive recommended treatment that could extend their lives, U.S. researchers have found.

For patients who didn't get care that follows the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) clinical practice guidelines, the risk of dying within five years of follow-up was 30 percent greater compared to women who got recommended treatment, said researcher Dr. Robert Bristow, director of gynecologic oncology at the School of Medicine of the University of California, Irvine.

Low-volume hospitals -- those that treat few cases of ovarian cancer -- are less likely than larger hospitals to follow the established recommendations for ovarian cancer, according to the study.

The findings lend support to the guidelines, Bristow said.

Women facing treatment for ovarian cancer, he said, should ask their doctor: "How many ovarian cancer patients do you treat a year?" If the answer is two, "You probably don't want to be one of those patients," Bristow said.

Each year, about 22,000 new cases of ovarian cancer are diagnosed in the United States, and more than 15,000 women die of it, according to the American Cancer Society.

For the study, Bristow and his colleagues analyzed the treatment and results for more than 13,000 women with ovarian cancer, using data reported to the California Cancer Registry from 1999 through 2006.

That time period was selected because there was no overall change in treatment approaches during those years, Bristow said. Such changes might have affected the results, scheduled for presentation Monday at the Society of Gynecologic Oncology annual meeting in Los Angeles.

Half the women studied were younger than 61, and the majority, 70 percent, had advanced cancer. First, the researchers looked to see how many women got treatment as recommended by the cancer network. The network is an alliance of 21 cancer centers that develops treatment guidelines.

Only 4,952, or 37 percent, got the recommended treatment.

Bristow's team looked at patient-related and health care system factors that might predict better adherence to treatment guidelines. They found the number of cases of ovarian cancer treated by the hospital and by individual doctors played a role.

"The high-volume hospitals, which did 20 or more cases a year, and high-volume physicians, which did 10 or more a year, were significantly more likely to administer treatment that was adherent to NCCN guidelines," Bristow said.

But even high-volume hospitals weren't always in compliance with the guidelines. High-volume hospitals delivered appropriate care 51 percent of the time, compared to 34 percent by low-volume facilities. High-volume doctors delivered appropriate care 48 percent of the time, compared to 34 percent by low-volume doctors.

Most of the women got care at low-volume facilities by doctors with little experience treating ovarian cancer.

Treatments include surgery and chemotherapy. In many cases, doctors provided some of the recommended care -- either chemo or surgery -- but not both, Bristow found.

In some cases, Bristow said, it's not possible to follow guidelines. For instance, an elderly women with other health issues, such as congestive heart failure, probably couldn't tolerate chemotherapy, he said.

A California-based expert, Dr. Mark Wakabayashi, said the finding ''echoes previous findings and my own clinical practice." Wakabayashi, division chief of gynecologic oncology at the City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, said he has treated many women whose previous cancer care did not follow these guidelines.

Compared to the national norms, survival statistics at high-volume centers are higher, he said.

But many women don't have access to a high-volume center. In those cases, he suggested they ask their doctor: "Do you follow NCCN guidelines?"

Data and conclusions presented at medical meetings are typically considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.

More information

For more on the national guidelines for cancer treatment, visit the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

SOURCES: Robert Bristow, M.D., professor and director, gynecologic oncology, University of California - Irvine School of Medicine; Mark Wakabayashi, M.D., chief of gynecology oncology, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, Calif.; Society of Gynecologic Oncology annual meeting, March 11, 2013, Los Angeles


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Abdominal Chemo Bath May Extend Survival in Ovarian Cancer Patients
2. Scientists uncover source of ovarian stem-like cells prone to give rise to ovarian cancer
3. Origin of aggressive ovarian cancer discovered
4. Gene Mutations Benefit for Ovarian Cancer Patients May Not Last: Study
5. Researchers discover breakthrough in ovarian cancer
6. Deep genomic analysis identifies a micro RNA opponent for ovarian cancer
7. Study drug is first to help patients with recurrent low-grade ovarian cancer
8. 2-step immunotherapy attacks advanced ovarian cancer
9. Preclinical study identifies master proto-oncogene that regulates ovarian cancer metastasis
10. Study shows high blood calcium levels may indicate ovarian cancer
11. Developed new method to diagnose hereditary breast and ovarian cancer
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... N.Y (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... Lori ... became a member of ElderCounsel, a national organization of elder law and special needs ... changing laws and rules. It also provides a forum to network with elder law ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... Milford, NJ (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... ... weekend at scenic Alexandria Park in Milford, NJ. This free event, sponsored by ... and physical activity. The fun run is geared towards children of all ages; ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... “America On The Brink”: the Christian history ... The Brink” is the creation of published author, William Nowers. Captain Nowers and ... WWII veteran, he spent thirty years in the Navy. Following his career as ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... , ... October 12, 2017 , ... IsoComforter, Inc. ( ... announced today the introduction of an innovative new design of the shoulder pad. ... you get maximum comfort while controlling your pain while using cold therapy. By utilizing ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... , ... HMP , a leader in healthcare events and education, today announced ... Award for ‘Best B-to-B Healthcare Website.’ Winners were announced during the Eddie & Ozzie ... competition recognizes editorial and design excellence across a range of sectors. This year’s program ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/12/2017)... 2017   Divoti USA will engrave and ... standard of the latest FDA requirements, which stipulates new criteria regarding ... in need of Medical ID jewelry such as Medical ID Bracelets, ... engraved in terms of the new FDA requirements . ... Divoti offers this dark mark fiber ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... 11, 2017  Hill-Rom Holdings, Inc. ("Hill-Rom") (NYSE: HRC), ... in Las Piedras, Puerto Rico , ... Following a ... sustained minor structural damage, temporary loss of power and ... been completed, manufacturing operations have resumed, and the company ...
(Date:10/4/2017)... Oct. 4, 2017  South Korean-based healthcare product Development ... aide "cprCUBE" on Kickstarter. The device will educate the ... arrests with better efficiency compared to the dated and ... feedback on efficacy of the compression for a more ... a goal to raise $5,000. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: