Navigation Links
Many Men Underestimate Prostate Surgery Side Effects
Date:8/13/2011

By Randy Dotinga
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Aug. 12 (HealthDay News) -- New research finds that men who undergo prostate removal often suffer more from incontinence and impotence than they expected, even when counseled beforehand about possible aftereffects.

The findings suggest there's a wide gap between what men with prostate cancer expect post-surgery and what actually happens -- and that many are shocked by the level of dysfunction after the operation.

After the surgeries, "we find that men are very disappointed and very sad. It's as if they really didn't hear what was being told to them," said study lead author Daniela Wittmann, a sexual health coordinator at the University of Michigan's prostate cancer survivorship program.

Removal of the prostate, a treatment for prostate cancer, is especially common among younger men, while older men often turn to radiation, said Dr. Stephen Freedland, an associate professor of urology and pathology at Duke University in Durham, N.C. The procedure can lead to urinary incontinence, sometimes to the point where men need to wear padding, as well as difficulty attaining and maintaining an erection.

Prostate cancer is also sometimes treated with hormonal therapy, which can also lead to impotence and other serious side effects, or by "watchful waiting," which means having regular exams while doctors keep an eye on the tumor to see if it grows or spreads. The latter is usually recommended when physicians feel someone's age will allow them to outlive the generally slow-moving cancer.

The study appears in the August issue of the Journal of Urology.

The problem is that the prostate is located right next to the urinary sphincter and nerves that contribute to erections, Freedland said. The operation to remove the prostate can disrupt those other parts of the body.

Competition among doctors may cause them to downplay the risks, Freedland said. "If one doctor says, 'Look, almost everybody I operate on leaks a little bit,' and the guy next door says, 'None of my patients leak,' one of them is telling the truth and the other isn't."

Compassion can be another factor preventing physicians from telling the entire story about risks. And patients themselves may be overly hopeful due to human nature, he said. "You're going to always have a mismatch between realities and expectations."

The new study tries to measure that gap. A total of 152 men undergoing radical prostatectomy (prostate removal) took part in the study. They received counseling about the surgery and were questioned before the operation and a year later.

The counselors talked to the patients for about 20 to 45 minutes with a focus on side effects, said study lead author Wittmann. That's more time than patients typically get with a urologist, she said.

A year after the surgery, 46 percent reported that urinary incontinence was worse than expected, while 44 percent said the same about sexual function. Most of the rest said their experiences in those areas were what they expected.

The researchers concluded that patients had "unrealistic expectations" despite the extensive counseling about side effects. They also discovered that a minority of the men (12 to 17 percent) expected to have better bladder control and improved erections after the surgery, which is the opposite of what usually occurs. Many more had thought that their bladder and sexual functioning post-surgery would at least remain the same, they noted.

Wittmann said the researchers plan to test another approach -- two-hour seminars for the patients and their partners about side effects, including tips men can use to try to alleviate them. "It includes the kinds of things that men can do to help themselves afterward," she said. "It's not just information on what you can expect, but what you can do."

More information

For more about prostate cancer, see the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

SOURCES: Daniela Wittmann, M.S.W, sexual health coordinator, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Stephen Freedland, M.D., associate professor, urology and pathology, Duke University, Durham, N.C.; August 2011, Journal of Urology


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Radiation rates for breast cancer may be underestimated, U-M study finds
2. Many Obese Moms and Kids Underestimate Their Weight
3. Mayo researchers find mortality rates from liver diseases underestimated
4. New treatment option for advanced prostate cancer
5. BIDMC scientists receive Challenge Awards from Prostate Cancer Foundation
6. Men have overly optimistic expectations about recovery from prostate cancer surgery, U-M study finds
7. Urine Test Might Help Predict Prostate Cancer Risk
8. What comes after prostate cancer
9. UT Southwestern scientists discover new pathway to potential therapies for advanced prostate cancer
10. For Some Prostate Cancer Patients, Combo Treatment Improves Survival
11. 7 in 1 blow: Scientists discover DNA regions influencing prostate cancer risk
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Many Men Underestimate Prostate Surgery Side Effects
(Date:5/26/2017)... ... May 26, 2017 , ... Silver Birch of Hammond, ... is located on more than four acres of land at 5620 Sohl Avenue in ... The 103,000 square-foot building includes 125 studio and one-bedroom apartments. Each of the private ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2017 , ... “THE FLINTHILLS FAMILY-Our Journey to the Cross”: ... FAMILY-Our Journey to the Cross” is the creation of published authors, Bob and Margaret Massey. ... used to say, he is "panther quick and leather tough." His love for others ...
(Date:5/26/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Water damage to the flooring of several classrooms at The ... officials with a number of critical issues to address before students could return to ... with little or no disruption to class schedules. Second, the project had to comply ...
(Date:5/24/2017)... ... , ... Altec Products, Inc., a leader in enterprise document management ... conference in San Diego, CA. , At nVerge 2017, Altec will be highlighting ... enhance their Sage ERP solutions by providing improved visibility and control to the entire ...
(Date:5/24/2017)... ... May 24, 2017 , ... Patients who want to receive cosmetic dentistry procedures ... Dr. Joseph Bedich for a consultation, with or without a referral. Dr. Bedich enjoys ... functionality. , Dr. Bedich offers a variety of cosmetic dentistry services at ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/22/2017)... 2017  As the specialty pharmacy industry and ... make the revolutionary shift from volume-based to value-based ... positive patient outcomes and shaping the future of ... away from clinical trials and toward data that ... drug therapy utilization in precise patient populations. Therigy ...
(Date:5/15/2017)... , May 15, 2017 Enterin Inc., a ... and developing novel compounds to treat Parkinson,s disease (PD), ... study is a Phase 1/2a randomized, controlled, multicenter study involving ... It will enroll 50 patients over a 9-to-12-month period. The ... in 10 patients with PD. Participating sites include ...
(Date:5/10/2017)... May 10, 2017 Global Health Intelligence ... Latin America , published its 2017 ranking of the ... based on extensive data analysis from GHI,s hospitals database ... database for the region. The GHI database covers 86% of ... more than 130 data points for each institution in key ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: