Navigation Links
Many High-Risk Women Refuse Breast MRI
Date:12/22/2009

Though it helps ID early breast cancer, 42 percent in study declined free test

TUESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- For women at high risk of breast cancer, an MRI can help detect malignancies early and is often suggested in addition to annual mammograms. Yet, 42 percent of such women in a new study said no to the test.

"We were surprised that so few women wanted to have MRI, even though it was no cost to them," said study author Dr. Wendie A. Berg, a breast imaging specialist at Johns Hopkins' Green Spring Station in Lutherville, Md.

Berg and her colleagues offered 1,215 women at high or intermediate risk of breast cancer an MRI for screening, but 512 women refused the test. They cited claustrophobia, time problems and reluctance to have the contrast medium injected as some of their reasons. They also mentioned financial concerns and the need to travel to get the test.

In an MRI, a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and other structures. MRI is often used to evaluate the heart, liver, kidney, spleen, pelvic organs, blood vessels and breasts.

Contrast material may be swallowed or injected to produce a better image. The patient is rolled into a cylindrical machine, and some have problems because of claustrophobia.

In the Berg study, the acceptability of the test was lower than expected, said Robert Smith, director of cancer screening for the American Cancer Society (ACS). "I would think most women would accept the test if their doctor suggested it," he said.

The study is published in the January issue of Radiology.

Smith said he was surprised that claustrophobia was cited more often -- by 25.4 percent of the women -- than reluctance to inject the contrast material -- 5.3 percent.

The ACS recommends MRI plus mammograms annually beginning at age 30 for certain groups of women with a high risk of getting breast cancer, which is defined as more than a 20 percent lifetime risk. For instance, those with the genetic mutation known as BRCA1 or 2 would be candidates for getting both.

In the study, some of the women were at intermediate, not high risk, of breast cancer, Smith noted.

But Berg said that there is a gray area about what to do with intermediate-risk women as far as adding MRI to their screening program. "There is some evidence that it's of value for intermediate-risk women," she explained.

Berg said genetic counseling would be of benefit for some women who are unsure if they are at very high risk of breast cancer. For instance, women who may benefit from genetic counseling and possibly testing for the BRCA1 or 2 mutations include those who are first-degree relatives of a known BRCA mutation carrier and those who have a male family member with breast cancer.

"I think the researchers need to understand a little better what is behind the rejection, and how it might be overcome," Smith said.

Berg suspects that once awareness of the value of MRI is raised and more women know it increases cancer detection, there will be a greater interest in getting the test.

More information

To learn more about MRI, visit American College of Radiology.



SOURCES: Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., breast imaging specialist, American Radiology Service, Johns Hopkins at Green Spring Station, Lutherville, Md.; Robert Smith, Ph.D., director, cancer screening, American Cancer Society, Atlanta; January 2010 Radiology


'/>"/>
Copyright©2009 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. Antioxidants show no clear benefit against cardiovascular events, death in high-risk women
2. High-risk behaviors could lead to HIV epidemic in Afghanistan
3. New clues to breast cancer development in high-risk women
4. Generic prostate drug helps find high-risk cancers early
5. Study finds strong demand for HIV meds after high-risk sex
6. State of Arkansas Department of Human Services, Division of Medical Services Selects U.S. Care Management for High-Risk Obstetrics Health Management Program
7. AST Emergence to Convergence Highlights the Latest High-Risk Organ Donor and Recipient Issues
8. Heavy drinking, conduct disorder linked to high-risk sexual behavior
9. Study finds outcomes of high-risk cancer operations in 80-year-olds worse than reported
10. Molecules might identify high-risk acute-leukemia patients
11. Vitamin D May Curb Falls in High-Risk Older Women
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/20/2017)... PA (PRWEB) , ... February 20, 2017 , ... ... collaborating to help health care providers better manage patient health risks, foster behavior change ... medication video library in the world, will present a demonstration of its video capability ...
(Date:2/20/2017)... TX (PRWEB) , ... February 20, 2017 , ... ... is now offering a full range of emergency dental care at his office, ... and gums. When patients experience dental emergencies, they are at risk for serious ...
(Date:2/19/2017)... ... February 19, 2017 , ... The Citadel’s new Swain ... is being led by Amelia Joseph, Ph.D. Joseph was engaged by the college as ... nursing department in early 2016. After a nation-wide search, she was selected to head ...
(Date:2/18/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... February 17, ... ... Change for Devicemakers , Sponsored by Axendia, **FDAnews Free Webinar**, March 1, ... Are manufacturers looking to reduce their regulatory burden? Pay dividends in enhanced ...
(Date:2/18/2017)... ... February 18, 2017 , ... ... Use Pixel Film Studios ’ ProParagraph Fashion Volume 2 for all multi-line ... other applications. Users can pick and choose from hand-crafted trend-setting designs with ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/20/2017)... , Feb. 20, 2017   Orion Health ... its Amadeus precision medicine platform to the ... currently manages over 110 million patient records globally. ... developing cloud-based, big data solutions built on modern, scalable ... Healthcare and Life Sciences. "The AWS Cloud gives healthcare ...
(Date:2/20/2017)... , Feb. 20, 2017 Seal Shield ... health IT solution for mobile device management and disinfection, ... HIMSS Conference and Exhibition in Orlando, Fla. ... Mobile devices have become commonplace in today,s ... a new set of concerns, including the disinfection and ...
(Date:2/20/2017)... Feb. 20, 2017  There has been a paradigm ... (NCDs) across sub-Saharan Africa, which in turn is driving ... of more Western lifestyle diseases such as cardiovascular disease ... infectious and parasitic illness, will present the pharmaceutical industry ... opportunity of $40.8 billion in 2019. "An ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: