Navigation Links
Many HIV Patients Carry Strain With Drug-Resistant Mutation
Date:2/28/2011

MONDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A new study estimates that between 10 percent and 15 percent of HIV patients in Europe and the United States are infected with a form of HIV that already has at least one drug-resistant mutation.

The researchers found that the risk of treatment failure in these patients is three times higher than normal, and said their findings confirm the need for drug resistance testing in new patients to determine which antiretroviral drugs are most likely to be successful.

For the study, 10,056 HIV patients who were beginning combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) for the first time were categorized into three resistance categories: 90.5 percent (9,102 patients) had no transmitted drug-resistance (TDR); 4.7 percent (475 patients) had at least one mutation and were receiving fully active cART; 4.8 percent (479 patients) had at least one mutation and were resistant to at least one prescribed drug.

Compared to patients without TDR, those with TDR and resistance to at least one prescribed drug were more than three times as likely to experience treatment failure, confirming "the need for at least three fully active antiretroviral drugs to optimize the virological response to a first-line regimen," the researchers wrote.

But the risk of treatment failure was not significantly different between patients without TDR and those with TDR taking a fully active cART regimen containing drugs not compromised by resistance.

The researchers also found that treatment failure was higher among patients with TDR who were taking two nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) plus one non-nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) and were predicted to be on a fully active treatment, compared to patients on protease inhibitor-based regimens whose risk of treatment failure was similar to patients with no TDR.

"If drug-resistant mutations are detected before treatment initiation, a ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor can be included in the first treatment regimen, which, because of its higher genetic barrier, could better protect from the risk of virological failure than could NNRTI," Dr. Linda Wittkop, of INSERM, University Bordeaux Segalen in Bordeaux, France, and colleagues wrote.

"These findings confirm present treatment guidelines for HIV, which state that the initial treatment choice should be based on resistance testing in treatment-naive patients," they concluded.

The study is published in the Feb. 28 online edition of The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has more about HIV treatment.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, news release, Feb. 27, 2011


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Doctors Can Influence Patients to Lose Weight: Studies
2. Heart Patients With Depression Often Find ER Delays
3. Experts call for greater pain assessment in hospitals as 65 percent of patients report problems
4. Fish Oil Seems to Help Cancer Patients Preserve Muscle
5. Standard Exams Might Not Catch Full Potential of Brain Damaged Patients
6. New way to identify patients at risk of dysphagia after head and neck cancer treatment
7. Type 1 Diabetes Patients Need New Kidney Therapies: Study
8. Many Dialysis Patients at Risk for High Radiation Exposure
9. Statins Might Help HIV Patients, Study Suggests
10. Most locked-in syndrome patients say they are happy
11. Lack of health insurance limits hepatitis C patients access to latest antiviral therapy
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Many HIV Patients Carry Strain With Drug-Resistant Mutation
(Date:6/26/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... June 26, 2017 , ... New patients ... from Dr. Angela Cotey, with or without a referral. Dr. Cotey is a trusted ... of this preferred tooth replacement option. , Patients with missing teeth in Fitchburg, WI, ...
(Date:6/25/2017)... ... 25, 2017 , ... An increase in wetter weather in the Northern California ... with that; a humdinger of an allergy season. A relief from drought conditions is ... misery-causing grass and weed pollen. , “Our patients have been reporting the typical ...
(Date:6/24/2017)... , ... June 24, 2017 , ... ... offering genetic testing for medications in select Florida and Texas doctors' offices and ... , This new application of genetic testing recognizes the role genes play in ...
(Date:6/24/2017)... Killeen, TX (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2017 , ... ... can boost home security, such as getting a guard dog or having an alarm ... homes simply aren’t secure against forced entry. Yair Frenkel, owner of TX Premier Locksmith ...
(Date:6/23/2017)... ... June 23, 2017 , ... Yesterday, U.S. Senate Republicans ... to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Like the bill narrowly ... to Medicaid, a public health insurance program for low-income children, pregnant women, parents ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/5/2017)... The Cincinnati location of ... (NYSE: DPLO), has been awarded a Top Workplaces 2017 ... Results are based on an employee survey administered by WorkplaceDynamics, ... improvement. The survey measures several aspects of workplace culture, including ... ...
(Date:6/1/2017)... BLUE BELL, Pa. , June 1, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... Nutriceuticals (PRN) and Veterinarian Recommended Solutions (VRS), and KD ... direct investment in Nutriceutical Holdings by KD Pharma Group. ... Nutriceutical Holdings with the option to acquire the entire ... ideal partner in KD. They are committed to growing ...
(Date:5/29/2017)... May 29, 2017  Cellect Biotechnology Ltd. (NASDAQ: ... which enables the functional selection of stem cells, today ... the first quarter ended March 31 st , 2017. ... accomplishments in the first quarter of 2017," said Dr. ... we announced the treatment of the first blood cancer ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: