Navigation Links
Many HIV Patients Carry Strain With Drug-Resistant Mutation
Date:2/28/2011

MONDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A new study estimates that between 10 percent and 15 percent of HIV patients in Europe and the United States are infected with a form of HIV that already has at least one drug-resistant mutation.

The researchers found that the risk of treatment failure in these patients is three times higher than normal, and said their findings confirm the need for drug resistance testing in new patients to determine which antiretroviral drugs are most likely to be successful.

For the study, 10,056 HIV patients who were beginning combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) for the first time were categorized into three resistance categories: 90.5 percent (9,102 patients) had no transmitted drug-resistance (TDR); 4.7 percent (475 patients) had at least one mutation and were receiving fully active cART; 4.8 percent (479 patients) had at least one mutation and were resistant to at least one prescribed drug.

Compared to patients without TDR, those with TDR and resistance to at least one prescribed drug were more than three times as likely to experience treatment failure, confirming "the need for at least three fully active antiretroviral drugs to optimize the virological response to a first-line regimen," the researchers wrote.

But the risk of treatment failure was not significantly different between patients without TDR and those with TDR taking a fully active cART regimen containing drugs not compromised by resistance.

The researchers also found that treatment failure was higher among patients with TDR who were taking two nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) plus one non-nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) and were predicted to be on a fully active treatment, compared to patients on protease inhibitor-based regimens whose risk of treatment failure was similar to patients with no TDR.

"If drug-resistant mutations are detected before treatment initiation, a ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor can be included in the first treatment regimen, which, because of its higher genetic barrier, could better protect from the risk of virological failure than could NNRTI," Dr. Linda Wittkop, of INSERM, University Bordeaux Segalen in Bordeaux, France, and colleagues wrote.

"These findings confirm present treatment guidelines for HIV, which state that the initial treatment choice should be based on resistance testing in treatment-naive patients," they concluded.

The study is published in the Feb. 28 online edition of The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has more about HIV treatment.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, news release, Feb. 27, 2011


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Doctors Can Influence Patients to Lose Weight: Studies
2. Heart Patients With Depression Often Find ER Delays
3. Experts call for greater pain assessment in hospitals as 65 percent of patients report problems
4. Fish Oil Seems to Help Cancer Patients Preserve Muscle
5. Standard Exams Might Not Catch Full Potential of Brain Damaged Patients
6. New way to identify patients at risk of dysphagia after head and neck cancer treatment
7. Type 1 Diabetes Patients Need New Kidney Therapies: Study
8. Many Dialysis Patients at Risk for High Radiation Exposure
9. Statins Might Help HIV Patients, Study Suggests
10. Most locked-in syndrome patients say they are happy
11. Lack of health insurance limits hepatitis C patients access to latest antiviral therapy
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Many HIV Patients Carry Strain With Drug-Resistant Mutation
(Date:5/5/2016)... Tucson, AZ (PRWEB) , ... May 05, 2016 , ... ... more attention being paid to the impact our aging population has on communities and ... help aging adults plan for and face age-related challenges. , Aging Life Care ...
(Date:5/5/2016)... ... May 05, 2016 , ... Pivot Point Consulting ... gold standard KLAS Performance Report, Epic Consulting 2016 - Which Firms ... specialize in consulting services for electronic health record (EHR) solutions from Epic ...
(Date:5/5/2016)... ... May 05, 2016 , ... Qrono ... today announced a development collaboration with the Australian critical medicine company, Phebra ... as schizophrenia. , LAI medicines can offer improved therapeutic benefits over oral formulations, ...
(Date:5/5/2016)... ... May 05, 2016 , ... Textile Exchange is excited to ... public stakeholder review. The stakeholder review is an important opportunity for interested parties to ... delivers value to the wool industry., The RWS is intended to be a global ...
(Date:5/5/2016)... ... May 05, 2016 , ... ... for electronic cigarettes, requiring e-cigarette manufacturers to submit their products through an arduous ... to all vaping products that entered the market since February 15, 2007. That ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/5/2016)... 5, 2016  Replikins Ltd. today reported initial promising results in animal trials of ... http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160505/364345 ... ... ... Zika specimens recorded on Pubmed. The analysis identified the highest gene Replikin Counts in ...
(Date:5/5/2016)... -- Endo International plc (NASDAQ: ENDP ) ... , President, U.S. Branded Pharmaceuticals, has decided to ... of a successor. Mr. Lortie joined Endo in ... responsibility for all strategic, commercial and operational functions, ... commercial operations, managed markets, manufacturing, supply chain and ...
(Date:5/5/2016)... , May 5, 2016 Endo International plc (NASDAQ: ... of Douglas S. Ingram , former president of Allergan, ... Todd B. Sisitsky , managing partner of TPG Capital, to ... "Endo recently embarked on ... enhance and expand the Board,s capabilities. Doug and Todd are ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: