Navigation Links
Many Doctors Ignore Cancer Genetic Testing Guidelines
Date:7/25/2011

MONDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- Many doctors are not following guidelines on genetic counseling and testing for women at average and high risk for breast and ovarian cancer, according to a new study.

This lack of compliance could result in women missing out on treatments that could reduce their chances of developing these diseases, the researchers pointed out in a report published in the July 25 online edition of the journal Cancer.

"Despite the existence of evidence-based guidelines on referral for genetic counseling and testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, many physicians report practices contrary to these recommendations," Katrina Trivers, of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said in a journal news release.

Women with mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene or family histories of these mutations are at significantly greater risk for breast and ovarian cancer. Genetic counseling and testing are recommended for high-risk women because there are treatments that could significantly lower their risk for the diseases. These services are not recommended, however, for women who are not considered high-risk, because the harms of treatment outweigh the benefits, the study authors explained.

For the study, 1,878 U.S. family physicians, general internists and obstetrician-gynecologists responded to a survey about the services they provide to women during annual exams. More specifically, the researchers asked the doctors how frequently they refer women to genetic counseling or offer BRCA1/BRCA2 testing. The investigators also sought to determine if the doctors' answers would vary based on their female patients' age, race, insurance status or ovarian cancer risk.

The study found that only 41 percent of physicians said they would refer high-risk women for genetic counseling or testing. Meanwhile, contrary to guidelines, 29 percent of doctors said they would sometimes or always refer average-risk women.

Trivers and colleagues concluded that more efforts are needed to ensure that only high-risk women receive these services. They also noted that doctors said they are more likely to follow current recommendations when they can accurately assess their patients' risks of cancer.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute provides more information on women's cancer risk and genetic testing.

-- Mary Elizabeth Dallas

SOURCE: Cancer, news release, July 25, 2011


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Doctors Urge Ban on Junk Food Ads During Kids Shows
2. Nudging doctors in intensive care unit reduces deaths
3. Study Finds Equal Number of Errors in Hospitals, Doctors Offices
4. Fit Doctors More Likely to Prescribe Exercise: Study
5. Medicare improved Canadian doctors salaries: Queens University study
6. Top 5 list helps primary care doctors make wiser clinical decisions
7. Abortions generate $95 million a year for Polish doctors as women use illegal private sector
8. Younger doctors prescribe more drugs to reduce heart risk but offer less lifestyle advice
9. Doctors decisions on initial hospital admissions may affect readmission rates
10. Doctors Prescribing Meditation, Yoga More Often
11. Discovery could change the way doctors treat patients with cancer and autoimmune diseases
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Many Doctors Ignore Cancer Genetic Testing Guidelines
(Date:12/6/2016)... ... ... 'Tis the season for family, festivity, food and fun! Temptation abounds, and parties ... healthy, staying active, and taking medication and doing daily foot health checks (a must ... trips, parties and family gatherings can take their toll on our feet during the ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... ... December 06, 2016 , ... ... authorized OSHA Training Institute Education Center headquartered in Northern California, has announced the ... providing occupational safety and health training to public sector employees. , “The primary ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Edward Buckingham MD , and the ... the newest Sciton laser in January 2017. The Halo is the first and ... wavelengths for exceptional results. Outperforming more traditional lasers, the innovative Halo automatically customizes ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... Petersburg, Fla. (PRWEB) , ... December 05, 2016 , ... ... concussions have on the growing brains of young athletes. Over the course of three ... the head through unique mouth guards. The mouth guards, equipped with special sensors, will ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... ... December 05, 2016 , ... ... company will provide alerting technology to Central Illinois Health Information Exchange (CIHIE) ... in federal funds as the sole sub-recipient participating with the Illinois Health ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/6/2016)... , Dec. 6, 2016 In this age ... to be hopeful.  A special kind of sunglasses, from ... anxious life. Photo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20161205/445444 ... Robert Buck, the psychotherapist who developed and patented the ... to overcoming anxiety and worry.  "Anxiety doesn,t have ...
(Date:12/5/2016)... , Dec. 5 2016 United ... Summary GlobalData,s new report, "United Kingdom ... key market data on the United Kingdom Ophthalmic ... millions of US dollars, volume (in units) and ... Coherence Tomography (OCT), Retinal Ultrasound Imaging Systems, Corneal ...
(Date:12/5/2016)...   Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals (NYSE: MNK ... that it received a perfect score of 100 percent ... benchmarking survey and report on corporate policies and practices ... equality, administered by the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) Foundation. ... which also earned top marks this year. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: