Navigation Links
Many Breast Cancer Patients Uninformed About Options: Study
Date:1/20/2012

By Madonna Behen
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In too many cases, doctors aren't doing a good job of informing American women with early stage breast cancer about the disease or their options in terms of surgery, a new study suggests.

In the study, researchers at the University of North Carolina surveyed breast cancer survivors on their knowledge of the disease. Respondents typically answered only about half of the questions correctly, and less than half said their surgeons had even asked them about their personal preference for surgery -- a full mastectomy vs. breast-conserving lumpectomy -- prior to treatment.

"We found that breast cancer survivors had fairly major gaps in their knowledge about their surgical options, including about the implications for recurrence and survival," said study lead author Dr. Clara Lee, an associate professor of surgery and director of surgical research at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill.

The paper was published in the January issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

For the study, Lee and her colleagues sent surveys to 746 women who had undergone surgery for stage one or stage two breast cancer at one of four medical centers: the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston; the University of California, San Francisco; and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

Among the 440 patients who responded to the survey, less than half (about 46 percent) knew that local recurrence risk is higher after breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) than after mastectomy, and only about 56 percent of women knew that survival rates are equivalent for both options.

The study also revealed that women who said they preferred mastectomy were less likely to have treatment that was in accordance with their goals. Lee said this was probably because "patients reported that their doctors were more likely to discuss breast conservation therapy and its advantages than mastectomy. And many women did not recall being asked for their preference. We know from other studies that doctors don't always know their patients' personal preferences, so they may not be fully aware when a woman truly prefers mastectomy."

The fact that less than half (48.6 percent) of the patients recalled being asked their preference was particularly concerning to Lee.

"It would be one thing if we were talking about decisions for which there is clearly a superior treatment, such as treatment for an inflamed gallbladder," Lee said. "In this case, it's reasonable and actually better for the surgeon to make a recommendation. But here we're talking about a decision where there is no medically right answer, and it really depends on the patient's preference. In that situation, it makes sense to ask the patient what she prefers."

Another breast cancer surgeon cautioned that the retrospective nature of the study (asking women to recall past events) and the fact that the women filled out the surveys an average of two and a half years following surgery makes it hard to draw firm conclusions.

"Clearly there are deficits in knowledge, but what we don't know for sure is if that's because the surgeon failed to convey this information, or the surgeon failed to convey it in a way that the patient could understand, or the patient has simply forgotten," said Dr. Leslie Montgomery, chief of breast surgery at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City.

"If anything, I'm actually surprised that the numbers were as good as they were," Montgomery added. "There's often a big difference between what a woman is told and what she actually absorbs at a time when she is so emotionally distressed."

Montgomery believes the study is valuable, however, because it "helps identify the scope of the problem" and will be useful for designing future prospective trials.

"As surgeons, we really need to make sure we convey the proper information to a woman at what is probably one of the most stressful times in her life," Montgomery said.

More information

Find out more about surgical options for treating breast cancer at the American Cancer Society.

SOURCES: Clara Lee, M.D., associate professor of surgery and director, surgical research, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill; Leslie Montgomery, M.D., chief, Division of Breast Surgery, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, N.Y.; January 2012, Journal of the American College of Surgeons


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Study Hints That Statins Might Fight Breast Cancer
2. Comparison of effects of red wine versus white wine on hormones related to breast cancer risk
3. Drug Duo May Help Fight Aggressive Form of Breast Cancer
4. Combining 2 anti-HER2 drugs may provide better preoperative breast cancer treatment
5. Does Deodorant Ingredient Affect Breast Cancer Risk?
6. Early-stage breast cancer patients lack knowledge; may not receive treatment they prefer
7. Most Parents Tell Kids About Test Results for Breast Cancer Genes
8. Most parents who get tested for breast cancer genes share results with their children
9. Prospective surveillance model emerges as standard of care for breast cancer treatment
10. Moderate red wine drinking may help cut womens breast cancer risk, Cedars-Sinai study shows
11. LSUHSC research finds trigger for breast cancer spread
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Many Breast Cancer Patients Uninformed About Options: Study
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... 05, 2016 , ... In the fourth quarter of 2015, ... the La Valencia Hotel in San Diego, California to discuss changes in the ... most outstanding franchise, walking away with the coveted David Wright Award of Excellence. ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... 05, 2016 , ... Pivot Point Consulting, a leading national ... & Services for HIT Implementation Support & Staffing report with an outstanding score ... by healthcare executives, managers and clinicians representing over 4,500 hospitals and 2,500 clinics. ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 05, 2016 , ... Colorize ... from on one drop zone to the next using Colorize's dynamic moving camera. Colorize ... project. This package includes a 3D slideshow environment with 1 to 5 focus points ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... , ... February 05, 2016 , ... Calls Blacklist has ... completely new user interface design and the developer has fixed known bugs within the ... want to on their phone while not consuming any of their device’s battery power ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 04, 2016 , ... ... "It's All About YOU Re-Treat" on February 19-21, 2016, in Southern California ... at Rancho Palos Verdes, California. These 30 professional speakers, including Clinical Psychologist and ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/4/2016)... , Feb. 4, 2016 For hospitals ... or those already participating in the program, the Health ... referred to as the , Mega-Guidance , could have ... guidance is published in September 2016. Essential ... and Service Marketing , summarizes the Mega-Guidance,s key proposed ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... -- Worldwide Radiology Oncology surgical robot markets are ... systems provide a way to improve traditional open ... systems pinpoint the delivery of radiation precisely, eliminating ... problem previously, limiting the quantity of radiation that ... far beyond what has been available, promising a ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... , Feb. 4, 2016 Wegener ... Global Markets Direct,s, ,Wegener Polyangiitis - Pipeline ... Wegener Polyangiitis,s therapeutic pipeline. This report provides ... Polyangiitis, complete with comparative analysis at various stages, ... (MoA), route of administration (RoA) and molecule type, ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: