Navigation Links
Mammograms Cut Risk of Breast Cancer Death by Half, Study Finds
Date:12/6/2011

By Kathleen Doheny
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News)-- Women who get routine mammograms can lower their risk of dying from breast cancer by nearly half, a new Dutch study suggests.

"Our study adds further to the evidence that mammography screening unambiguously reduces breast cancer mortality," said Dr. Suzie Otto, a senior researcher in the department of public health at Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

The routine screening also lowered the chances of being diagnosed with an advanced cancer, she said.

The study appears online Dec. 6 in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

Mammography screening, including the best schedule and the best age to begin, is being hotly debated in the United States and elsewhere. Some experts think women should start getting them at age 40. Other think women should discuss the pros and cons of the test at 40, decide on an individual basis and start screens routinely at 50. Otto's study only looked at women aged 49 and older.

Otto tracked 755 patients who died from breast cancer from 1995 to 2003 and another 3,739 control patients matched by age and other measures.

Among the women with breast cancer, nearly 30 percent of tumors were found at screening and about 34 percent between screens. Nearly 36 percent of these women had never had a mammogram.

Advanced tumors were found in about 30 percent of the patients who had never been screened but in just over 5 percent of those who had mammograms.

Women who underwent screening reduced their risk of dying from breast cancer by 49 percent. Women aged 70 to 75 had the greatest risk reduction, reducing the risk of dying from breast cancer by 84 percent. The risk reduction in younger women, aged 50 to 69, was smaller, at 39 percent, but still considered substantial.

The greater risk reduction in women aged 70 to 75, Otto said, is probably a result of the long-term good effects of screening participation in the earlier target age group, 50 to 69, before the upper age limit for screening was extended in the Netherlands from 69 to 75.

The study findings ''add to the body of evidence supporting the fact that mammography matters in improving detection and survival," said Dr. Stephanie Bernik, chief of surgical oncology at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "This study focuses on survival."

The study, however, has some limitations, Bernik noted. It's not clear, for instance, whether the women who died of cancer got less aggressive treatment or refused treatment. That could have affected survival, of course.

Mammography does lead to ''overtreatment" in some cases, Bernik acknowledged. Some cancers that are found on mammography may not have proven to be an issue in a woman's lifetime. "But there is no way to figure out which cancers will be a problem or not," she said.

More information

To learn more about mammograms, visit the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

SOURCES: Suzie Otto, Ph.D., senior researcher, department of public health, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Stephanie Bernik, M.D., chief, surgical oncology, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; Dec. 5, 2011, Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, online


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Study Supports Mammograms For Women in Their 40s
2. Depression and anxiety not linked to delayed resolution of abnormal mammograms, Pap tests
3. New Canadian Guidelines Also Support No Routine Mammograms Until 50
4. Less Frequent Mammograms May Lower False-Positive Results
5. Women Say Mammograms Give Them Sense of Control: Survey
6. New national poll: 89 percent of women said mammograms vital to their health
7. Foreign-Born U.S. Women Getting Mammograms
8. Mammograms on the rise for foreign-born women living in the US
9. More Mammograms Equal More Mastectomies: Study
10. Annual Breast Exams, Mammograms Still Key to Detecting Breast Cancer
11. Decline in Hormone Therapy Linked to Fewer Mammograms
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Mammograms Cut Risk of Breast Cancer Death by Half, Study Finds
(Date:3/22/2017)... ... March 22, 2017 , ... Soriant recognizes that identifying savings ... Healthcare facilities across the country are always forced to focus on costs ... across the country, an efficient and quick way to estimate savings potential within ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... , ... March 22, 2017 , ... ... to cure Rett Syndrome, a devastating neurological disorder that afflicts 350,000 individuals worldwide. ... on the X chromosome, and almost exclusively strikes females. Following a normal ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... PA (PRWEB) , ... March 22, 2017 , ... Last ... according to a US Department of Agriculture report. While excess dairy can be ... play a role. Lactose sensitivity is the inability to properly digest lactose, a sugar ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... ... March 22, 2017 , ... The Tyler Hitchcock ... to communities across eastern Texas, is announcing a charity drive in conjunction with ... children and adults. , Consistently a top-rated nonprofit organization for hunger relief, ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... ... March 22, 2017 , ... ... and financial planning assistance to communities throughout central Ohio, is initiating a charity ... Estimates from the Department of Defense and the Veteran's Brain Injury Center conclude ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/22/2017)... EarlySense , the market leader in Contact-Free ... recognized medical center and a member of Partners Healthcare, has ... of its Early Detection of Deterioration Project. The facility also ... time to alarms. ... According to the peer-reviewed paper published ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... 22, 2017 FinancialBuzz.com News Commentary ... cannabis industry is strongly contributing to job creation. A ... and reporting for the cannabis industry, projects that by ... a quarter million jobs for American workers. The legal ... 2016, and is projected to grow at a compound ...
(Date:3/22/2017)...  As the world,s leading non-profit dedicated to fighting ... played a role in most therapies used today to ... helping patients with other cancers and serious diseases. Such ... cutting-edge research – more than $1 billion in the ... record-breaking sum of $4.1 million raised at the 30 ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: