Navigation Links
Male birth defect is weakly linked to pesticide exposure, Stanford-led study finds
Date:10/29/2013

STANFORD, Calif. A study of several hundred chemicals used in commercial pesticides has found only weak evidence that any of them are associated with a common birth defect in male infants.

The study, led by epidemiologists at the Stanford University School of Medicine, analyzed thousands of birth records and commercial pesticide application records for eight counties in California's heavily agricultural Central Valley. The researchers aimed to determine whether children were at increased risk of hypospadias if their mothers had lived in relatively close proximity to where pesticides were used while pregnant. Hypospadias is a genital malformation in which the urethral opening is on the underside of the penis rather than on the tip.

In the most detailed study of the largest data sets done to date, 292 individual chemicals and 57 groups of structurally similar chemicals were analyzed. Of those, the study identified 15 that had possible associations with hypospadias. But the researchers say further studies need to be done.

"We didn't see many chemicals that suggested an increased risk, and of those that did, most of them were infrequently used," said Suzan Carmichael, PhD, associate professor of pediatrics and lead author of the study to be published Oct. 28 in Pediatrics. "It is good news that such exposures are rare, but at the same time, when exposures are rare, it makes studies harder to do."

Approximately five of every 1,000 male infants are born with hypospadias, but the cause is usually unknown.

Most previous studies of pesticides and hypospadias focused on risks associated with occupations that involve the use of pesticides. Some studies have suggested slightly increased risks for infants whose mothers or fathers work around pesticides, but many studies suggest no association.

The researchers worked with data on births in the counties of Fresno, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, San Joaquin, Stanislaus and Tulare. The Central Valley, composed of the San Joaquin and Sacramento valleys, has one of the highest rates of pesticide usage in the nation.

The study population included all male infants born from 1991 to 2004 to mothers residing in any of the eight counties at the time of birth. The study sample comprised 690 cases of hypospadias, as well as 2,195 controls randomly selected for comparison.

The researchers considered pesticides used within 500 meters of the mother's residence during weeks one to 14 of each pregnancy. Urethral development typically occurs between weeks four and 14.

Hypospadias has a significant impact on public health, as it often requires surgical correction. Approximately 600,000 to 900,000 American males alive today were born with some degree of hypospadias. Even after correction, individuals may have impaired sexual function and emotional and social difficulties stemming from the condition.

"Any birth defect is concerning to parents, and a defect in the genital structure often causes special concern," said William Kennedy, MD, associate professor of urology at Stanford and associate chief of pediatric urology at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital.

"Parents are often reluctant to talk to anyone even medical professionals about the baby's condition," Kennedy added. "Fortunately, most corrective surgeries have positive outcomes."

In addition to exposures to individual chemicals and compounds, the researchers looked at exposure to multiple chemicals, but found no evidence to suggest that mothers' exposures to multiple pesticides put their babies at an increased risk of hypospadias.

"These results extend what we know, but at the end of the day they need to be replicated before we can really be sure whether there is, or is not, a real risk associated with these chemicals," said Gary Shaw, DrPH, professor of pediatrics at Stanford and a co-author of the study. Shaw, Kennedy and Carmichael are also members of the Child Health Research Institute at Stanford.


'/>"/>

Contact: Louis Bergeron
louisb3@stanford.edu
650-724-9175
Stanford University Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Depo-Provera Birth Control Might Raise Breast Cancer Risk
2. Wellesley study shows income inequality a key factor in high US teen births
3. Planning Pregnancy May Cut Birth Defects
4. U.S. Teen Births Hit Record Low
5. Certain Birth Control Pills May Carry Higher Blood Clot Risk: FDA
6. New global report says US lags behind 130 other nations in preterm birth rate
7. Pneumonia and preterm birth complications are the leading causes of childhood death
8. Babies susceptibility to colds linked to immune response at birth
9. Birth Control Pills, HRT Tied to Digestive Ills
10. Fewer Stillbirths Among Pregnant Women Vaccinated Against Flu
11. Immigrant women giving birth in Spain suffer great stress, a study warns
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/25/2017)... ... 2017 , ... ProRehab Physical Therapy (PRPT) is ... therapy provider for Derby City CrossFit, effective immediately. , In addition to treating ... effectively as possible, ProRehab’s sports physical therapists will work with athletes to maximize ...
(Date:4/25/2017)... ... 2017 , ... A recent report from the Wisconsin Institute ... 2015-16 school year across Wisconsin’s public schools, charter schools, and private schools participating ... student test score performance, the report’s limited analyses fail to provide answers as ...
(Date:4/25/2017)... , ... April 25, 2017 , ... ... they rely on contracted partners to help with process innovation in drug formulation ... drug formulation experience along with state-of-the-art analytical equipment in support of their development ...
(Date:4/25/2017)... ... 25, 2017 , ... Saad B. Chaudhary, MD is committed to providing the highest quality of ... I focus on preventative care with all my patients to alleviate possible future issues. I ... free to contact my office and my trained staff will assist you in any way ...
(Date:4/25/2017)... ... 25, 2017 , ... Vetoquinol USA® , a world-class ... part of the EQUISTRO line, at this week’s Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event in ... immunologic level. , The scientifically-developed Flexadin UCII supports the body’s normal repair of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/20/2017)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the ... Market and Increasing Usage of Complex Biologics during the Forecast Period" ... ... 20 Billion in 2015 to around USD 26 Billion by 2020. ... by Rapidly Expanding Injectables Market and Increasing Usage of Complex Biologics ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... April 20, 2017  AbbVie (NYSE: ABBV), a ... (n=145/146) of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected ... 6 and compensated cirrhosis (Child-Pugh A) achieved sustained ... ) with its investigational, pan-genotypic regimen of glecaprevir/pibrentasvir ... seen following 12 weeks of G/P treatment without ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... , April 20, 2017 NeuroVive ... ("NeuroVive") today announced positive preclinical results demonstrating ... compound for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), in an ... NV556 has previously shown similar ... model. Today, NeuroVive,s scientists present novel data ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: