Navigation Links
Male Contraception: Progress Slow but Steady

Experts say future choices will extend beyond condoms, vasectomy

SATURDAY, April 12 (HealthDay News) -- For now, men who want to do their part for birth control have meager choices: A vasectomy -- meant to be permanent -- and condoms.

For years, experts have predicted that male contraception is under development and that more choices will be here soon.

But when? Experts agree it's still a ways off, but it's getting closer.

"It has been slow," said Dr. Ronald Swerdloff, a researcher in the quest to find feasible male contraceptive methods. But there are good reasons for that slow pace, added Swerdloff, an endocrinologist and chief of the division of endocrinology at Harbor-UCLA and professor of medicine at the Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles.

Pharmaceutical companies are reluctant to take on a new product quickly because of untested liability issues, he said. And "one of the biggest single issues has to do with the fact that contraception in general is a difficult area it would be used by large numbers of healthy individuals." The safety threshold, he noted, is high. Still, he added, more options are moving closer.

"If we really focus on studies, with funding, it could be four or five years" before more options might be available, said Elaine Lissner, director of the Male Contraception Information Project, a San Francisco-based organization.

The problem, she added, is that the research has been scattergun. "If we [continue to] do a study here, a study there, as we have for the last 20 years, it could take forever."

At a "Future of Male Contraception" conference, sponsored by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in Seattle, a variety of methods were reviewed, including:

  • Hormonal therapy and testicular warming -- Swerdloff and his team found that giving men testosterone and another hormone with testicular warming helped suppress sperm. "The transient testicular warming [like sitting in a spa] causes the suppression to occur much earlier [than the hormones alone]," he said.
  • Transdermal gels -- In another study by Swerdloff's team, 140 men applied either a progestin gel called Nestorone or a testosterone gel, or both. The researchers studied various doses and then drew blood samples to measure hormone levels. They reported on the 119 men who complied and finished the study, concluding that the combination worked better to suppress sperm.
  • "Intra Vas Device," or IVD -- An alternative to a vasectomy, this method involves inserting silicone plugs into the vas deferens, the tube sperm move through and the same tube cut in a vasectomy. "The sperm can't get past the plugs," said Joe Hofmeister, president of Shepherd Medical Company in St. Paul, Minn., the IVD developer. "Preliminary six-month data show that 90 percent of 60 men [tracked to date] have zero motile sperm," he said. More study is needed to track the IVD for reversibility, Hofmeister said.
  • Vitamin A blocker -- Columbia University researchers tested a drug abandoned by a pharmaceutical company because it interferes with vitamin A receptors in the testes, lowering fertility. It worked well in animal studies; whether it will do the same in human studies is not yet known.

These approaches, if successful, will take several more years to get market approval, all the researchers agreed.

More information

To learn more about all available contraception methods, visit the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

SOURCES: Ronald Swerdloff, M.D., professor of medicine, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, chief of the division of endocrinology, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center; Joe Hofmeister, president, Shepherd Medical Company, St. Paul, Minn.; Elaine Lissner, director, Male Contraception Information Project, San Francisco; "Future of Male Contraception" conference, Seattle

Copyright©2008 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. MicroRNAs, EMT and cancer progression
2. New data showed Actos prevented progression of atherosclerotic plaque volume in patients
3. Biomarker May Signal HIV Progression
4. Expansion of monocyte subset could serve as a biomarker for HIV progressions
5. FASgen Diagnostic Tests Identify Ovarian Cancer Progression and Apoptosis
6. Ardea Biosciences Reports Progress of Clinical Development Programs; Provides 2008 Outlook; Announces 2007 Financial Results and Provides 2008 Financial Guidance
7. Jazz Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Announces LUVOX CR Launch Plans and Reports Development Pipeline Progress at Investor Day Presentation
8. Is increased Slug expression associated with the progression to esophageal cancer?
9. IOF announces Progress in Osteoporosis now available free online
10. Leading researchers honored for progress in cancer prevention, detection and treatment
11. Enormous Progress in Reducing Cancer Does Not Include Lung Cancer
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Male Contraception: Progress Slow but Steady
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... ... are pleased to announce their strategic partnership at the Radiological Society of ... Service, Inc., and Winscribe, global providers of cutting-edge dictation and speech-enabled documentation ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... 2015 , ... Several significant coding-related changes are anticipated to ... include new codes for spine and hip X-rays, paravertebral facet blocks and in ... changes in musculoskeletal, radiology and nervous system sections on an Orthopedic practice. These ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... ... and services which empower organizations through communication analytics, announced today that their Proteus® ... and manage their service quality. , Proteus® VoIP QMS (Quality Management System) ...
(Date:11/29/2015)... Michigan (PRWEB) , ... November 29, 2015 , ... "I ... games. Things that as a Mother and Wife would love to do, I missed. ... that I just happened to call Dr. Zaidan first. They have changed my life ...
(Date:11/29/2015)... ... 2015 , ... Khanna Vision Institute based in Los Angeles, announced that Dr. ... 2015. Peer Certification by the Board is done so the public knows that the ... obtained after the completion of three years of training or Residency in Ophthalmology. This ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:11/30/2015)... Nov. 30, 2015   Royal Philips (NYSE: ... the industry,s first MRI guided user interface and automatic ... patients with MR Conditional implants, such as knee and ... 2015 Radiological Society of North America Annual Meeting (RSNA) ... supports diagnostic confidence of this growing patient population. ScanWise ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... 2015 Nautilus Medical Inc. today announced worldwide ... ( ). The release of MatrixRay to the ... (Radiology Society North America) in Chicago ... --> --> MatrixRay ... to radiology studies worldwide via a peer-to-peer exchange network ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... BOCA RATON, Fla. , Nov. 30, ... of Public Research (the Institute) announced today that ... , a medical device start-up company with technology developed ... creation based on publicly-funded research, and bridges early funding ... -based universities and research institutions. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: