Navigation Links
Major advanced cancer study to be led by Uppsala University
Date:8/18/2011

Several prominent cancer researchers are now joining forces in an advanced new cancer study. The goal is to understand which tumors will be difficult to treat and to find out why certain cancer drugs lose their effect after a period of use. The study is to be directed by Tobias Sjblom, associate professor of tumor biology at Uppsala University, Sweden.

The study involves a hundred cancer patients, suffering from either cancer of the large intestine or chronic lymphatic leukemia. Samples will be taken from patients both before and after drug treatment. The aim is to find out what makes so many tumors resistant to treatment a major problem in cancer care today.

"With this initiative we will have a unique opportunity to study the development of tumors up close. Several research teams will examine the samples using different analytical methods in order to get an overall picture," says Tobias Sjblom, associate professor of tumor biology at Uppsala University and director of the study.

What lies behind this resistance is not known today, but it is assumed to emerge when the tumor changes over time, mutates. This also alters the original approach to treatment. In the study scientists will be looking for mutations in all the genes in the tumors.

The study is to be performed by Uppsala scientists together with colleagues from the Royal Institute of Technology, the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, and Ume University. It is made possible by funding from SciLifeLab, a total of SEK 4.5 million over two years. All analyses will be done at SciLifeLab, which is a national resource center for medical and bioscience research.

"This is a model for how we want to work with large projects within SciLifeLab. Researchers receiving funding from us have access to our resources in the form of technologically advanced equipment and competence, while their own expertise in the specific research field ensures that the right questions are being asked. This enables us to generate new knowledge about diseases more quickly," says Kerstin Lindblad-Toh, director of SciLifeLab Uppsala.

This type of research is also of interest to the pharmaceuticals industry.

"The industry will have an opportunity to assess the effect of their drugs, and we hope this will provide greater insights into how we can predict how different patients will react to a certain medicine in the future," says Tobias Sjblom.


'/>"/>

Contact: Tobias Sjblom
tobias.sjoblom@igp.uu.se
46-070-167-9039
Uppsala University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Seattle Childrens lands major funding with hopes of saving thousands of infant lives
2. Group Health establishes major initiative to prevent opioid abuse and overdose
3. Nottingham scientist wins major cancer research award
4. Major award for leading expert in regenerative medicine
5. Obesity a Major Cause of Early Death in Women: Study
6. Major malaria drug research award
7. Lawmakers Urged to Consider Health Effects of Major Legislation
8. Government should consider public health implications of all major legislation
9. Deaths and major morbidity from asbestos-related diseases in Asia likely to surge in next 20 years
10. UB played major role in study on drug that reduces breast cancer in high-risk women
11. New advances in lipid genetics lead to better detection and prevention of major diseases
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... The American workforce is on ... security. Most importantly, employees are the single most important asset in creating value ... unhappy? , Just under half of American workers are emotionally checked out with ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... The White ... repaying their loans, more information about their loan terms and accounts, and more ... loan debt, including federal and private loans, has reached $1.3 trillion, with 43 ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... Coast Dental Fort Stewart is celebrating ... new location in the Exchange Furniture Mall at 112 Vilseck Road in Fort Stewart. ... Smart TV. Plus attendees will have the opportunity to meet general dentists Thomas Richards, ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... Spine Team Texas, a comprehensive spine physician group ... of their physicians has been invited to be a featured speaker at the Texas ... conference on April 30, 2016. , Dr. R. Scott McPherson, a physical medicine ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... Mobility Designed is redefining mobility with ... armpits, the M+D Crutch evenly distributes body weight from the elbow to the forearm. ... using the crutches than with other crutches. , Co-founders Max and Liliana Younger were ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/27/2016)... Elekta today announced that its ... the focal point of seven scientific presentations at ESTRO ... Radiotherapy & Oncology, taking place April 29 - May ... system and a high-field MRI scanner with sophisticated software ... anatomy in real time. The MR-linac is designed to ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... April 27, 2016  Bayer Animal Health today ... from the University of Florida College of Veterinary ... Excellence in Communication Award (BECA). Brittany was selected ... awarded a total of $70,000 in scholarship funds ... years, Bayer has provided a total of $232,500 ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... , April 27, 2016 ... USD 2.14 billion by 2022, according to a ...      (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20150105/723757 ) , ... affecting the efficiency and accuracy delivered by the ... demand for novel urinalysis instruments and consumables. For ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: