Navigation Links
MU awarded $8.5 million to explore tiny vessels' role in cardiovascular diseases
Date:5/6/2010

One of the largest medical research grants ever awarded to the University of Missouri was announced today by MU scientists and administrators. The National Institutes of Health grant will help answer important questions about such prevalent health problems as high blood pressure, diabetes and stroke. The conditions are closely associated with cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of death in Missouri and the nation.

The $8.47 million program project grant from the NIH's National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) will fund an integrated research effort involving more than 20 scientists across campus. Their discoveries will further understanding of the smallest blood vessels in the body, collectively known as the microcirculation. How the miniscule vessels contribute to health and disease is a growing field of study for cardiovascular researchers.

"The grant has given us a very large opportunity that will help us focus on the many questions we have about microvascular function," said Gerald Meininger, PhD, the program director and project principal investigator, as well as director of MU's Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center. "By focusing the efforts of many scientists, we hope to further understand the underlying conditions that contribute to many different types of cardiovascular diseases."

Life literally depends on the microcirculation. The network of vessels, with walls as small as a single cell thick, are responsible for transferring gases, nutrition and hormones throughout the body. The vessels also remove waste, such as carbon dioxide, from organs and tissues. The ability of these processes to function properly, over and over again through many of miles of tiny vessels, is what determines the health of the entire cardiovascular system and all the organs and tissues it supports.

"MU has spent decades developing one of the most productive groups of cardiovascular investigators in the world, with a special emphasis on the emerging field of microcirculation," said Robert Churchill, MD, Hugh E. and Sarah D. Stephenson Dean of the MU School of Medicine. "This grant is the latest example of what MU can achieve when scientific talent and resources from across campus come together to achieve a critical mass in a critical area of medical research."

The grant projects are particularly reliant on scientists and resources at MU's Dalton Cardiovascular Research Center, School of Medicine and College of Veterinary Medicine. Other key collaborators include MU's Center for Gender Physiology and Environmental Adaptation, Cosmopolitan International Diabetes and Endocrinology Center, Charles W. Gehrke Proteomics Center, and research support cores for computing, translational science and electron microscopy. Microscopy and spectrometry technology at Dalton and MU's Christopher S. Bond Life Sciences Center provide advanced tools for high-resolution imaging and analysis.

"The imaging resources give MU a powerful advantage in terms of trying to answer questions about blood vessels that are thinner than human hair, as well as cells and tissues," said Ronald Korthuis, PhD, chair of the Department of Medical Pharmacology and Physiology and a project leader for the grant. "Where others can only speculate, we are able to show the world."

All of the project leaders in the program grant are faculty members in the MU School of Medicine Department of Medical Pharmacology and Physiology, which is ranked 12th in the nation in terms of research grant funding. The prominence of Dalton and the department in microcirculation research led to MU's selection as host for more than 150 scientists from around the world for a meeting of the Microcirculatory Society in October 2009.

The pharmacology and physiology department also is generously supported by private gifts for endowed faculty positions and research centers. Grant program director Meininger, project leader Michael Davis, PhD, and George Davis, MD, PhD, and other department scientists involved in the grant are Margaret Proctor Mulligan Distinguished Professors in Medical Research. Korthuis, a project leader, is the George L. and Melna A. Bolm Distinguished Professor in Cardiovascular Health. Center for Gender Physiology director Virginia Huxley, PhD, is the James O. Davis Distinguished Professor in Cardiovascular Research. She and other scientists are housed in the Thomas W. and Joan F. Burns Center for Diabetes and Cardiovascular Research.

"These endowments helped transform MU into a highly competitive institution for cardiovascular research," said Chancellor Brady Deaton, PhD, who recently led MU in receiving more than $1 billion in gifts for a campuswide fundraising campaign. "With this new NIH grant, we'll continue to leverage our significant investments in cardiovascular research to improve the health and quality of life for people across our state and throughout the world."


'/>"/>

Contact: Laura Gerding
gerdingla@health.missouri.edu
573-882-9193
University of Missouri-Columbia
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Carol Milgard Breast Center Awarded Highest Government Rating for Mammography Sites
2. Prominent Beverly Hills Law Firm Awarded $16.5 Million Medical Malpractice Jury Verdict
3. pcRUSH.com / Atman, Inc. is Awarded General Services Administration (GSA) Schedule (GS-35F-0099W)
4. $12 Million American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Grant Awarded to Urban Health Plan, Inc. (UHP)
5. Jefferson awarded multi-million dollar NIH grant
6. Orsi Awarded First Place for Procedure with Embozene(TM) Microspheres
7. Tender Corp.'s HealthiFeet Awarded American Podiatric Medical Association Seal of Approval
8. UM Clinical Research Building awarded prestigious LEED Building Certification
9. TeamStaff Awarded $3.3 Million Contract
10. Mimotopes Awarded a Major Peptide Library Supply Agreement by La Jolla Institute for their Studies Screening Dengue and Tuberculosis Pathogens
11. €1.6 million ($2.32 million) grant awarded to Prof. Kobi Rosenblum for brain and memory research
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... , ... IsoComforter, Inc. ( https://isocomforter.com ), one of the Nation’s ... design of the shoulder pad. The shoulder pad provides optimal support and full ... while using cold therapy. By utilizing ice and water that is circulated from an ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... Information about the technology: ... develop to enable prevention of a major side effect of chemotherapy in children. ... pediatric patients. For cisplatin, hearing loss is FDA listed on-label as a dose ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... D.C. (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... Leading ... their peers in Washington, D.C., for the 49th Congress of the International Society ... ., Vice President of the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... nation's first interactive health literacy software tool, and the Cancer Patient Education Network ... cancer patient education, today announce a new strategic alliance. , As CPEN’s ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... of California Berkeley, and other leading institutions in announcing the launch of the ... to change the way animals are raised for food. , Founding members of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/23/2017)... 22, 2017 Janssen Biotech, Inc. (Janssen) announced ... from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for ... for the treatment of moderately to severely active rheumatoid ... data are needed to further evaluate the safety of ... RA. "We ...
(Date:9/22/2017)... 22, 2017 AVACEN Medical (AVACEN) announced that ... successfully helping those with the widespread pain associated with ... Amanda in Essex, England commented, ... hair, experiencing no sleep at all, tremendous pain, with ... cannot recommend [the AVACEN 100] enough, how this has ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... Ky. , Sept. 19, 2017   ZirMed Inc ... predictive analytics, today announced that it has been ranked #1 ... Black Book™ Rankings 2017 User Survey. ZirMed was ... solution for large hospitals and medical centers over 200 beds ... Black Book,s healthcare technology user survey history. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: