Navigation Links
MRI shows new types of injuries in young gymnasts
Date:12/1/2008

CHICAGO Adolescent gymnasts are developing a wide variety of arm, wrist and hand injuries that are beyond the scope of previously described gymnastic-related trauma, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

"The broad constellation of recent injuries is unusual and might point to something new going on in gymnastics training that is affecting young athletes in different ways," said the study's lead author, Jerry Dwek, M.D., an assistant clinical professor of radiology at the University of California, San Diego and a partner of San Diego Imaging at Rady Children's Hospital and Health Center.

Previous studies have reported on numerous injuries to the growing portion of adolescent gymnasts' bones. However, this study uncovered some injuries to the bones in the wrists and knuckles that have not been previously described. In addition, the researchers noted that these gymnasts had necrosis, or "early death," of the bones of their knuckles.

"These young athletes are putting an enormous amount of stress on their joints and possibly ruining them for the future," Dr. Dwek said.

The radius is the bone in the forearm that takes the most stress during gymnastics. Due to damage to the radial growth plates, the bone does not grow in proportion to the rest of the skeleton and may be deformed. Consequently, it is not unusual for gymnasts to have a longer ulna than radius. Some former gymnasts must undergo surgery to shorten the ulna and regain the proper fit of the wrist bones into the forearm.

Dr. Dwek and coauthor Christine Chung, M.D., used MRI to study overuse injuries seen in the skeletally immature wrists and hands of gymnasts. The researchers studied wrist and hand images of 125 patients, age 12 to 16, including 12 gymnasts with chronic wrist or hand pain.

"We were surprised to be looking at injuries every step down the hand all the way from the radius to the small bones in the wrist and on to the ends of the finger bones at the knuckles," Dr. Dwek said. "These types of injuries are likely to develop into early osteoarthritis."

Dr. Dwek suggested that additional study is needed to understand how gymnastic stresses are causing these injuries.

"It is possible that by changing the way that practice routines are performed, we might be able to limit the stress on the joints and on delicate growing bones," he said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Linda Brooks
lbrooks@rsna.org
630-590-7762
Radiological Society of North America
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Study shows how shift workers can improve job performance and implement a realistic sleep schedule
2. MRI Shows New Types of Injuries in Young Gymnasts
3. Drug to Prevent Preterm Labor Shows Little Benefit
4. Report Shows Progress in Fight Against Cancer, but Congress, States Must Step Up Efforts to Reduce Smoking, Lung Cancer
5. Stanford/Packard study shows no benefit from drug widely used to prevent premature births
6. New Migraine Drug Shows Promise
7. Joint Commission Report Shows Gains in Safety, Quality
8. New Survey Shows Majority of Americans Need to Take Proper Steps to Manage Diabetes Risk
9. Radiologist Salary Survey Shows Fear of Universal Healthcare
10. Analyst Available to Comment on New JUPITER Study That Shows AstraZenecas Crestor Significantly Reduces CV Risk
11. New Survey Shows Seniors Overwhelmingly Satisfied With Medicare Part D
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... 2016 , ... US Sports Camps , official operators of Nike Yoga ... kids yoga training. ChildLight Yoga Studio is centrally situated in the picturesque New England ... Yoga Studio founder Lisa Flynn expresses her excitement, “We are thrilled to be partnering ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... 2016 , ... The American public tends to feel uncomfortable about drinking recycled ... municipal or well water. The recent experience with lead contaminated water in Flint, Michigan, ... way toward increasing public acceptance of recycled waste water as drinking water. , ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... February 05, 2016 , ... Give To Cure today announced that ... donate to Give To Cure’s campaign that is crowdfunding clinical trials to help find ... share payments through a smart device. In 2015 alone, Venmo processed $7.5 billion in ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Pivot Point Consulting, a leading national Healthcare ... Services for HIT Implementation Support & Staffing report with an outstanding score of ... healthcare executives, managers and clinicians representing over 4,500 hospitals and 2,500 clinics. , ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... ... , ... Dr. Justin Scott and Dr. Lydia Muccioli of Pure Dental ... individuals in need. The event is scheduled to take place on February 27, 2016 ... provide dental care to community members in need. Each patient will be given the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/5/2016)... 2016 Amgen (NASDAQ: AMGN ) will present ... Conference at 9:15 a.m. ET on Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2016, ... W. Meline , executive vice president and chief financial officer ... the presentation can be accessed from the Events Calendar on ... the webcast will also be available on Amgen,s website for ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... 2016  Patients in Alabama seeking ... therapy no longer have to travel out of state. ... Urology Centers of Alabama to provide a total ... qualifying patients. Alabama is ... of prostate cancer using many different modalities. They are the ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... York , February 5, 2016 ... Transparency Market Research report states that the global active ... 2014 and is predicted to reach US$185.9 bn by ... of 6.50% from 2014 to 2020. The title of ... Chemical/Biological, Captive/Contract Manufactured, by Geography, and by Therapeutic Area) ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: