Navigation Links
MRI before surgery leads to better-adapted treatment for breast cancer

Berlin, Germany: The early use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in women diagnosed with breast cancer can often lead to a better adapted surgical approach to the tumour, a scientist told the 6th European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC-6) today (Wednesday April 16). Dr. David Martinez-Cecilia, a surgeon from the General Surgery Service, directed by Prof. Rufian-Pea, in the Hospital Universitario Reina Sofia, Cordoba, Spain, said that this technique should become standard in determining the stage of the tumour before any operation.

Dr. Martinez-Cecilia and his team studied 249 patients who were undergoing surgery for breast cancer, and carried out routine MRI as soon as a biopsy showed malignancy. If additional lesions were discovered, a further biopsy was carried out on them.

Using MRI, we found 20 additional malignant lesions in 18 patients, he said, and that meant that for 15 patients we were able to change the surgical treatment to one which took care of all the tumours, as opposed to the single one that had originally been diagnosed. Three patients needed surgery in both breasts, one required a second lumpectomy in the same breast, and 11 changed from lumpectomy to mastectomy. The surgical treatment also changed in those patients where the MRI showed up a larger tumour than that which was originally identified; 16 other patients changed from lumpectomy to mastectomy, and one from lumpectomy to quadrantectomy, a partial mastectomy where the tumour and some surrounding breast tissue is removed to be sure that the margins around the tumour are cancer-free.

The scientists then carried out a retrospective analysis of the surgical outcomes. We found that the changes in surgical treatment had been beneficial in 22 patients (9%), non beneficial in 6 patients (2.4%), and uncertain in 4 patients (1.6%), said Dr. Martinez-Cecilia. The results also showed us that MRI is the best imaging technique for measuring tumour size, better than mammography or ultrasound. MRI is being used more frequently in breast cancer pre-operative staging these days, and we thought it was important to validate its efficacy.

MRI is expensive, but with results such as these it should be used as widely as possible pre-surgery, say the scientists. It will not only improve the surgical treatment, which was our main aim, but in the long run it will probably reduce costs to healthcare systems by allowing us to identify exactly what needs to be treated, and in what way, to avoid possible recurrences of the cancer and the costs associated with its treatment, said Dr. Martinez-Cecilia. We will continue working prospectively with this issue as we would like to see MRI become a standard preoperative treatment for breast cancer, along with biopsy, mammography, and ultrasound.


Contact: Mary Rice
ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation

Related medicine news :

1. MRI finds breast cancer before it becomes dangerous
2. Removing Ovaries Before Menopause Leads to Memory, Movement Troubles
3. Underage drinking starts before adolescence
4. Fat Builds Up in Hearts Before Diabetes Onset
5. Meth Project Chairman Testifies Before U.S. Senate Finance Committee
6. Take Care of Your Heart Before and After Problems
7. Benjamin England, Former FDA Regulatory Counsel, to Testify on FDA Import Strategic Plan Before House Appropriations Subcommittee
8. American Society of Transplantations Past President Testifies Before Congress at Forum on Organ Donation
9. Kaiser Permanente Study Shows One in Seven Women are Depressed Before, During, or After Pregnancy
10. Guidelines help patients reduce risk of cardiac event before surgery
11. URAC CEO Testifies Before New Hampshire Legislators Regarding New URAC Standards for Pharmacy Benefit Management
Post Your Comments:
(Date:12/1/2015)... ... ... Growth in medical payments per workers’ compensation claim in Louisiana slowed from 2011 ... according to a recent study by the Workers Compensation Research Institute (WCRI). , ... per claim with more than seven days of lost time continued to be higher ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... Wayland, MA (PRWEB) , ... December 01, 2015 , ... ... adults has a tattoo — a number even greater among Millennials (a whopping one ... there are more and more people who are dissatisfied with their ink. In fact, ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... ... December 01, 2015 , ... ... technicians must mark the film for accurate interpretation by the radiologist. The marking ... an inventor from Sacramento, Calif., has found a way to alleviate this problem. ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... ... 01, 2015 , ... Next IT Healthcare, the leader in ... this year’s Fierce Innovation Awards: Healthcare Edition, an awards program from the publisher ... in the category of Digital Solutions for its innovative, industry-leading product, Alme Health ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... ... December 01, 2015 , ... ... Effective Post-Affiliation Integration ,” addresses a main “pain point” for merging or aligning ... results, once a deal is signed. This quick-read guidance suggests that failing ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/1/2015)... , Dec. 1, 2015 Relmada Therapeutics, Inc. ... treatment of chronic pain, announced today that the company will ... be held December 1-3 at the Luxe Sunset Boulevard Hotel ... Traversa , CEO of Relmada Therapeutics, will present on Thursday, ... Time). . Please register at least 10 ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... 2015 CytRx Corporation (NASDAQ: CYTR ), ... today announced that it has reached its enrollment target ... 3 clinical trial of aldoxorubicin in patients with previously ... be completed in Q1 2016. The Phase 3 trial is ... Protocol Assessment from the FDA at 79 sites in ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... , Dec. 1, 2015  Today, ... the launch of CareFront, a first-of-its-kind population health ... diagnosed with cancer. Designed to be built into ... cancer patients with resources for their care and ... program also offers tools to help patients understand ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: