Navigation Links
MCG student receives national medical honor society research fellowship
Date:7/18/2012

AUGUSTA, Ga. A student at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Health Sciences University is among 47 recipients of the 2012 Carolyn L. Kuckein Student Research Fellowship from the national medical honor society Alpha Omega Alpha.

The $5,000 award is enabling Puja Chebrolu to spend her summer pouring over a huge federal database in an effort to help predict kidney dialysis patients' risk of bacteremia, a potentially lethal infection. It's also helping her better prepare for her likely future in public health.

While looking for ways to optimize her summer, Chebrolu learned of Dr. N. Stanley Nahman's desire to mine the U.S. Renal Data System's extensive data set of about 600,000 patients with more than 13 million hospitalizations to find what puts dialysis patients at risk for bacteremia. Chebrolu figured it was a good way to marry her interest in data and infectious diseases.

Years before, Nahman, an MCG nephrologist, had looked at a much smaller sample of 100 patients and found that hemodialysis patients with bacteremia most often also were infected with the blood-borne infection, hepatitis C. Nearly 25 percent of the patients in the U.S. Renal Data System have bacteremia, which tends to result from infection by multiple organisms normally found on skin. Inside the body, they can cause flu-like symptoms or worse. Intensive-care patients are another easy target for bacteremia, Nahman noted.

Conceding that even with excellent preventive measures, needles likely are a common cause of bacteremia in dialysis patients, Nahman and Chebrolu along with MCG Epidemiologist Dr. Kristina Kintziger want to objectively assess risks.

"When you start sticking needs into people you may introduce bacteria," Nahman said. "There is no question that the risk of blood-borne infection is higher in patients on hemodialysis," he said since, barring a kidney transplant, these patients spend the rest of their lives having blood removed from their bodies, filtered and returned. While Nahman was at the University of Florida, Jacksonville, he observed that dialysis patients who happened to also be infected with hepatitis C, tended to be at highest risk of bacteremia. Whether the infection dampened immunity, putting an already vulnerable population at additional risk, was among the questions raised. Hepatitis C, best known for the toll it takes on the liver, is actually very common in patients in kidney failure.

The current study is further probing the bacteremia/hepatitis C link in this large patient population, but is looking far broader, at some 150,000 diagnoses, in the quest for associations that could serve as red flags for physicians.

"Puja is looking for risk factors, whether it's diabetes, the dialysis catheter, their race, age or the average white count in their bloodstream," Nahman said. "Are they infected with HIV or do they have other infections, because we have about 150,000 diagnoses that we can choose to query and see if they associate with patients who have bacteremia. It may turn out hepatitis C is the main risk factor."

They are focusing on the most recent three years of data, said Kintziger who is putting the raw data into a usable format. She's familiar with the data set she is using to mentor several other medical students, including a similar study looking for risk factors for candidemia, a fungal infection more common in patients with compromised immunity, as well as risk factors for bacteremia in HIV-positive dialysis patients.

"I spend a lot of time in her office," Chebrolu said of Kintziger, adding that she is glad to learn data dissection directly from a professional rather than gleaning what she can on her own. "Every scientist collects data. Learning how to make it useful, presentable and understandable is a really good skill."

Nahman's enthusiasm for the research is infectious as well, Chebrolu noted. "It's been a great decision," to spend the long, hot Augusta summer looking for answers that may help patients, said the native of Columbus, Ga., who majored in microbiology at the University of Georgia. While admitting that her goal to do research and treat patients in distant lands is slightly idealistic, she believes it will enable her to one day make the biggest impact for the least amount of cost.

First- through third-year medical students at medical schools with active AOA chapters are eligible for the fellowship which supports clinical investigation, basic laboratory research, epidemiology, social science/health services research, leadership, or professionalism studies. Dr. Clarence Joe, Associate Professor of Radiology and Orthopaedic Surgery at MCG, is Councillor of the Alpha of Georgia Chapter.


'/>"/>

Contact: Toni Baker
tbaker@georgiahealth.edu
706-721-4421
Georgia Health Sciences University
Source:Eurekalert  

Related medicine news :

1. 40,000 Arizona student athletes receive concussion tests from Mayo Clinic
2. DotComSecrets’ Russell Brunson Is Revealing Online Money Making Secrets in Free Webinars for Students
3. Outstanding high school students receive awards to stimulate research interest in digestive diseases
4. Student researchers seek to develop new therapies for cancer
5. UC students design a better pill bottle for the blind and visually impaired
6. University studies and career expectations of medical students
7. Loyola Med student wins prize for excellence in neurology
8. Grant awarded to help improve problem-solving skills for deaf and hard-of-hearing students
9. Rice University student engineers automate limb lengthening for kids
10. Loyola Stritch, Niehoff students receive prestigious Schweitzer Fellowships
11. Students focus on creating a better cervical collar
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
MCG student receives national medical honor society research fellowship
(Date:2/9/2016)... ... ... Shark Finds and Kevin Harrington, and the Product Managers of AsSeenOnTV.pro are pleased to ... patented product that has solved some of the basic problems golfers have faced since the ... right after a rain shower, might understand the struggle of placing the club down for ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... 08, 2016 , ... The Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology ... site houses a wealth of federal resources that businesses can leverage to further ... transfer (T2). As a network of over 300 federal laboratories, the FLC’s mission ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Stephanie Hebert Insurance Agency, serving families of ... charity campaign. As part of their ongoing community involvement program, funds are now ... children deserve a voice, and in the spirit of neighbors helping neighbors in ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... Alexandria, Minn. (PRWEB) , ... February 08, 2016 ... ... introduces the BantamPro L top-load case packer for pouches, bags, and flow wrapped ... designed to help co-packers and specialty product manufacturers step up to semi-automatic or ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... Island, SC (PRWEB) , ... February 08, 2016 , ... ... surrounding areas with a vital new community enrichment program, has teamed up with Citizens ... women and children suffering from intimate abuse. To support all those victimized by the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/9/2016)... ORLANDO, Florida , February 9, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... QIA) today announced a collaboration with 10x Genomics ... sequencing (NGS), single-cell biology and bioinformatics. --> ... announced a collaboration with 10x Genomics to develop ... single-cell biology and bioinformatics. --> QIAGEN ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... Mast Therapeutics, Inc. (NYSE MKT: MSTX), ... disease and heart failure, today announced that it intends to ... stock in an underwritten public offering.  The offering is subject ... assurance as to whether or when the offering may be ... the offering.   --> --> ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... , February 9, 2016 ... company focused on developing products for Regenerative Medicine, Neurology ... a featured presenting company at Source Capital Group,s 2016 ... February 10-11, 2016 in New York City ... Wednesday, February 10, 2016 at 12:30 pm by ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: