Navigation Links
Lung cancer culprit could offer target for therapy, UT Southwestern researchers report
Date:9/13/2010

DALLAS Sept. 13, 2010 A tiny molecule that spurs the progression of non-small-cell lung cancer could become a player in fighting the disease, say researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center, who published a study on how the molecule behaves in mice in the Sept. 14 issue of Cancer Cell.

Scientists have known that the molecule microRNA-21, or miR-21, is present in overabundant quantities in human tumors, including non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Until now, however, it was unclear whether miR-21 contributed to the development of lung cancer, or whether it was simply an indicator of the presence of the disease.

To find out, lead study author Dr. Mark Hatley, an instructor of pediatric hematology/oncology, and UT Southwestern colleagues used mice that had been altered specifically to harbor non-small-cell lung cancer. In some of these mice, they genetically engineered the animals to produce too much miR-21. In another group, they deleted the miR-21 gene altogether, which eliminated the molecule in the rodents.

In animals with cancer, the results showed that too much miR-21, or overexpression, promotes the formation, growth and survival of new tumors by turning off certain genes that normally allow cancer cells to die. In fact, at 18 weeks of age, the study group with overexpressed miR-21 had significantly more tumors than their lung-cancer-carrying littermates with normal levels of miR-21. Healthy rodents engineered to overexpress miR-21 did not develop cancer.

"These results indicate that overexpression of miR-21 alone is not enough to initiate tumors in a healthy animal. Instead, it appears that miR-21 enhances the growth and survival of existing lung cancer," said Dr. Hatley, a Pediatric Scientist Development Program Fellow sponsored by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

Dr. Eric Olson, chairman of molecular biology at UT Southwestern and the study's senior author, said the experiments also show that deleting miR-21 sensitizes the animals' cancer cells to a certain kind of chemotherapy, suggesting that inhibiting miR-21 in lung-cancer patients could be of therapeutic value.

"Methods currently exist to pharmacologically manipulate molecules like miR-21," said Dr. Olson, who directs the Nancy B. and Jake L. Hamon Center for Basic Research in Cancer and the Nearburg Family Center for Basic and Clinical Research in Pediatric Oncology. "More research will be needed before we know whether this is applicable to humans, but it's possible that a drug designed to inhibit miR-21 could help keep cancer at bay."

MiR-21 is a type of molecule called a microRNA. These small snippets of RNA the chemical cousin of DNA normally help coordinate and regulate the production of specific proteins in cells. When miRNAs go awry, however, diseases such as cancer can result.


'/>"/>

Contact: Amanda Siegfried
amanda.siegfried@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Prostate Cancer Screening No Benefit to Older Men With Low PSA Levels
2. Early prostate cancer detection, screening: No benefit for men with low baseline PSA value
3. Cancer deaths fall, but prevention still lags behind
4. Obesity May Up Death Risk in Older Women With Colon Cancer
5. Improvement in prediction of blood clots in cancer patients
6. UC Davis study finds low liver cancer survival rates among Laotian/Hmong-Americans
7. SWOG names 5 cancer researchers outstanding Young Investigators
8. Scientists make leap forward in early detection for Alzheimers and cancer
9. Micro-RNA determines malignancy of lung cancer
10. Magic Mushroom Hallucinogen Might Help Cancer Patients
11. Multivitamin use doesnt impact colon cancer outcomes
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/17/2017)... Ocala, FL (PRWEB) , ... February 17, 2017 ... ... of software tools that allow for the electronic prescribing of controlled and non-controlled ... , Ninety percent of pharmacies in the United States now accept electronic ...
(Date:2/17/2017)... ... February 17, 2017 , ... ... Carol Francis' goals for each and every seminar, session and class she ... demonstrate five different brainwave tools which help energize creativity, focus mental functions, enhance ...
(Date:2/17/2017)... ... February 17, 2017 , ... Access today announced that ... Orlando, Fla., February 19-23. Visitors to the company’s booth (#1778) will be the ... patient signatures solution in healthcare . , Since it first introduced Electronic ...
(Date:2/17/2017)... ... February 17, 2017 , ... Pharmica Consulting ... on all facets of clinical trial planning and management. Pharmica discussed the importance ... more. In addition, attendees stopping by Pharmica’s booth were able to demo its ...
(Date:2/17/2017)... ... February 17, 2017 , ... Like most hospitals across ... Driven in large part by the Hospital Readmission Reduction Program (HRRP), the return of ... focus area for hospitals across the nation. While many providers are struggling to leverage ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/16/2017)... 2017  Express Scripts (NASDAQ: ESRX ) was recognized ... Companies within the Health Care: Pharmacy and Other Services category. ... World,s Most Admired Companies," said Tim Wentworth , CEO and ... passion of our 26,000 employees to make medicine more affordable and ... ...
(Date:2/16/2017)...  Prescription pain medications provided by "physicians in the ... long-term opioid use to take hold," according to a ... of The New England Journal of Medicine ... in acute pain than in almost any other medical ... of the American College of Emergency Physicians. "The challenge ...
(Date:2/16/2017)... , Feb. 16, 2017   Spectralink ... solutions for the healthcare, retail, manufacturing and hospitality ... on the performance and symbology support features of ... a dual-mode camera/barcode scanner. The study, conducted by ... the PIVOT:SC to two phones with dedicated hardware ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: