Navigation Links
Lung Transplant Hazard May Rise With Obese Recipients, Smoking Donors

TUESDAY, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- Major risk factors for serious illness and death after a lung transplant include a donor who smoked and a recipient who is obese, according to a new study.

Researchers reviewed the cases of nearly 1,300 people who received lung transplants at 10 U.S. lung-transplant centers over eight years. The study authors evaluated risk factors for severe primary graft dysfunction, a complication that affects up to 25 percent of lung-transplant patients shortly after surgery.

Primary graft dysfunction is the major cause of serious illness and death after lung transplantation.

The study appeared in the March issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

The researchers found that lung transplant recipients who were given lungs from smokers had a 5 percent higher risk of developing primary graft dysfunction than those who received lungs from nonsmokers.

But this finding does not mean that smokers should be prohibited from donating lungs, study lead author Dr. Joshua Diamond, an instructor of medicine in the division of pulmonary, allergy and critical care at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine, said in a school news release.

"Other studies show that overall survival is significantly better than remaining on waiting lists for lung transplantation when donors with a smoking history are part of the donor pool," Diamond said. "Given the limited pool of available lung donors, it's simply not feasible to exclude patients who were previous smokers as potential lung donors."

Compared to normal-weight lung-transplant recipients, the risk of primary graft dysfunction was 7 percent higher in overweight recipients and 11 percent higher in obese recipients.

The researchers also concluded that some previously identified risk factors -- including donor sex, race, age and cause of death -- were not associated with primary graft dysfunction.

Serious primary graft dysfunction usually occurs within three days after lung transplantation. Diamond and his colleagues found that recipients with primary graft dysfunction had a 23 percent risk of dying within 90 days of their transplant, compared with a 5 percent risk for those without the complication.

After one year, the death rate for those who had primary graft dysfunction was 34 percent, compared with 11 percent for those without the condition.

Efforts to better understand, predict and prevent primary graft dysfunction would dramatically improve outcomes for lung-transplant patients, the researchers said.

Although the study tied donors' smoking history and recipients' obesity to a higher risk of lung transplant complications, it did not establish a cause-and-effect relationship.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about lung transplantation.

-- Robert Preidt

SOURCE: Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, news release, March 6, 2013

Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Discovery could help to develop drugs for organ transplant and cancer patients
2. Xenotransplantation as a therapy for type 1 diabetes
3. First, Second Kidney Transplants Have Similar Success: Study
4. Lenalidomide prolongs disease control for multiple myeloma patients after stem cell transplant
5. Statins prevent cancer in heart transplant recipients
6. U.S. Liver Transplants Declining
7. Study shows antibiotic improves respiratory function in lung transplant patients
8. UCLA launches first face transplantation program in western US
9. Use of Smokers Lungs for Transplant Has Pros, Cons
10. Skin transplant offers new hope for vitiligo patients
11. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation increases survival in systemic sclerosis patients
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Lung Transplant Hazard May Rise With Obese Recipients, Smoking Donors
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... June 26, 2016 , ... Brent Kasmer, a legally blind and certified personal trainer is ... a fitness app. The fitness app plans to fix the two major problems leading the ... one size fits all type program , They don’t eliminate all the reasons ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... , ... June 25, 2016 , ... "With 30 hand-drawn ... specific project," said Christina Austin - CEO of Pixel Film Studios. , ProHand ... all within Final Cut Pro X . Simply select a ProHand generator and ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... Conventional wisdom preaches the benefits of ... of the latter, setting the bar too high can result in disappointment, perhaps even ... progress toward their goal. , Research from reveals that behind ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... The Pulmonary Hypertension Association ... it will receive two significant new grants to support its work to advance ... 25th anniversary by recognizing patients, medical professionals and scientists for their work in ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... People across the U.S. are ... Code Talker Award, an essay contest in which patients and their families pay tribute ... presented at the 2016 National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) Annual Education Conference (AEC) ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... OAKLAND, N.J. , June 24, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... in the design, development and manufacturing of collagen ... and regeneration announced today that Bill Messer ... Sales and Marketing to further leverage the growing ... surgery medical devices. Bill joins the ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... Va. , June 24, 2016 The ... set of recommendations that would allow biopharmaceutical ... (HCEI) with entities that make formulary and coverage decisions, ... the "value" of new medicines. The recommendations ... does not appear on the drug label, a prohibition ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... 2016   Pulmatrix, Inc ., (NASDAQ: ... drugs, announced today that it was added to the ... its comprehensive set of U.S. and global equity indexes ... important milestone for Pulmatrix," said Chief Executive Officer ... our progress in developing drugs for crucial unmet medical ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: