Navigation Links
Low-income uninsured adults less likely to have chronic conditions compared with Medicaid enrollees
Date:6/23/2013

Compared with adults already enrolled in Medicaid, low-income uninsured adults who may be eligible for Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act were less likely to have chronic conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia, although those with 1 of these conditions were less likely to be aware they had it or to have the disease controlled, according to a study in the June 26 issue of JAMA. The study is being released early to coincide with its presentation at the AcademyHealth annual research meeting.

Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), states have the option to expand Medicaid coverage to most low-income adults, an option that could add millions of new Medicaid enrollees. "In states choosing to implement the expansion, with full federal financing from 2014 through 2016, this would expand Medicaid's traditional focus away from low-income pregnant women and children, very-low-income parents, and the severely disabled to new population groups. These include childless adults and parents whose incomes are too high to qualify for Medicaid under current state eligibility criteria. This is likely to affect the type of Medicaid patients seen by physicians in states choosing to expand Medicaid. State decisions regarding Medicaid expansion will likely consider the anticipated costs and health benefits to their populations," according to background information in the article. "Uncertainty exists regarding the scope of medical services required for new enrollees."

Sandra L. Decker, Ph.D., of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, Md., and colleagues conducted a study to document the health care needs and health risks of uninsured adults who could gain Medicaid coverage under the ACA. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2010 were used to analyze health conditions among a nationally representative sample of 1,042 uninsured adults 19 through 64 years of age with income no more than 138 percent of the federal poverty level, compared with 471 low-income adults currently enrolled in Medicaid. The 1,042 uninsured respondents correspond to a weighted estimate of 14.7 million uninsured adults who could be eligible for Medicaid coverage under the ACA based on 2007-2010 demographic characteristics. The primary measured outcomes were prevalence and control of diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia based on examinations and laboratory tests; measures of self-reported health status including medical conditions; and risk factors such as obesity status.

The researchers found that compared with those enrolled in Medicaid, the uninsured adults reported better overall health; were less likely to be obese and sedentary; less likely to report a physical, mental, or emotional limitation; and much less likely (by 15.1 percentage points) to have multiple health conditions.

Although the uninsured adults were less likely than those enrolled in Medicaid to have diabetes, hypertension, or hypercholesterolemia (30.1 percent compared with 38.6 percent), if they had 1 of these conditions, the conditions were more likely to be undiagnosed or uncontrolled. An estimated 80.1 percent of the uninsured adults with 1 or more of these 3 conditions had at least 1 uncontrolled condition, compared with 63.4 percent of those enrolled in Medicaid.

The weighted counts corresponding to the prevalence estimates translate to approximately 1.4 million uninsured adults potentially eligible for Medicaid with at least 1 condition undiagnosed and 3.5 million with at least 1 condition uncontrolled, compared with approximately 0.6 million and 1.4 million, respectively, among those currently enrolled in Medicaid.

"One-third of potential new Medicaid enrollees are obese, half currently smoke, one-fourth report a functional limitation, and one-fourth report their health as fair or poorall factors that could require attention from clinicians. If Medicaid uptake is low, the uninsured adults who do enroll in Medicaid may be disproportionately drawn from those with more health problems than average among those made newly eligible. Because many of the uninsured adults have not seen a physician in the past year and do not have a place they usually go for routine health care, they are likely to need care on first enrolling in Medicaid," the authors write.


'/>"/>

Contact: Jeff Lancashire
jhl1@cdc.gov
301-458-4800
The JAMA Network Journals
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Low-Income, Minority Parents More Open to HPV Vaccine for Girls, Study Says
2. First analysis of dental therapists finds increase in access for children, low-income adults
3. Moffitt researchers analyze HPV vaccination disparities among girls from low-income families
4. Structured weight loss program helps kids from low-income families lower BMI
5. Low-Income Patients Often Have Trouble Reaching Doctor Via Email
6. Low-income pregnant women in rural areas experience high levels of stress, researcher says
7. Sesame Street Live's Super Grover Visits WHEDco in the South Bronx to Teach Low-Income Children What it Takes to be a Super Hero
8. In minutes a day, low-income families can improve their kids health
9. Obesity may be declining among preschool-aged children living in low-income families
10. Seeing fewer older people in the street may lead low-income adults to fast-track their lives
11. Expanding Medicaid to low-income adults leads to improved health, fewer deaths
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/26/2017)... , ... June 26, 2017 , ... ... in the country, today announced the hiring of Richard Robinson as chief operating ... leadership and operations experience, with a proven track record of simplifying business processes ...
(Date:6/26/2017)... , ... June 26, 2017 , ... ... staff, and consumers are seeing lots of red these days. According to recent ... charges that result from medical coding errors(1). Some studies point to Electronic Health ...
(Date:6/25/2017)... ... ... Create a feel-good lyric music video in Final Cut Pro X with ProLyric from Pixel ... in the lyrics to any song. ProLyric flies in the text for each section and ... be added modularly for optimal control. ProLyric makes editing any music video or text-based production ...
(Date:6/25/2017)... ... 25, 2017 , ... With a heatwave currently bearing down on Northern California pushing temperatures to ... Being swimsuit ready is easy with laser hair removal. , The process of summer ... burdensome routine when all you want to do is get out, dive in and cool ...
(Date:6/24/2017)... Ronkonkoma, New York (PRWEB) , ... June 24, ... ... now joined the Dental365 family. Located at 217 Portion Road in Lake Ronkonkoma, ... also open evenings and weekends so that visits to the dentist fit into ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/7/2017)... -- Novavax, Inc., (Nasdaq: NVAX ) today announced that ... its RSV F protein recombinant nanoparticle vaccine candidate (RSV F ... in the journal Vaccine (the data ... conferences). The Company previously announced top line results ... RSV F Vaccine with the goal of protecting infants from ...
(Date:6/5/2017)... CINCINNATI , June 5, 2017 The ... a brand of Diplomat Pharmacy, Inc. (NYSE: DPLO), has been ... Cincinnati Enquirer . Results are based on ... specializing in organizational health and workplace improvement. The survey measures ... ...
(Date:6/3/2017)... , June 3, 2017  Eli Lilly and ... that results from the Phase 3 MONARCH 2 ... & 6 inhibitor, in combination with fulvestrant, significantly ... fulvestrant alone in women with hormone-receptor-positive (HR+), human ... cancer who have relapsed or progressed after endocrine ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: