Navigation Links
Long-term health and social outcomes for neuroblastoma survivors
Date:7/31/2009

Survivors of the childhood cancer neuroblastoma are eight times more likely to have chronic health conditions, less likely to be married, and more likely to have lower incomes than their siblings, according to a study published online July 31 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

This study was undertaken because minimal information exists on the long-term outcomes for neuroblastoma survivors.

Caroline Laverdiere, M.D., of the Sainte-Justine Hospital in Montreal, and colleagues looked at data for 954 5-year neuroblastoma survivors who were diagnosed from 1970-1986 and enrolled in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS). Late mortality, second malignant tumors, and chronic health conditions were analyzed. The researchers also compared participants with a cohort of 3,899 siblings of children with cancer for risk of chronic health conditions and sociodemographic outcomes.

Neuroblastoma survivors were less likely to be married or employed with high income than the controls from the sibling cohort, and after 20 years follow-up, were more than eight times more likely to have chronic health conditions, such as neurological, endocrine, sensory, and musculoskeletal complications.

"[R]esults of the current study are quite relevant and underscore the need for close surveillance and life-long follow-up to ameliorate potential medical and psychosocial late effects," the authors write. "Future research should build on these data and investigate risk factors for long-term complications of neuroblastoma treatment and second malignant neoplasms"

In an accompanying editorial, Elizabeth Fox, M.D., of the Pediatric Oncology Branch at the Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, in Bethesda, Md., Deborah Citron, M.D., of the Radiation Oncology Branch at NCI, and Frank M. Balis, M.D, of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, point out that survivors who were treated with multimodal therapy in this time frame had twice as much risk of late effects as survivors who had localized neuroblastomas that could be treated with surgery alone. Because surviving neuroblastoma patients from the 1970s were less likely than both current neuroblastoma patients and survivors of other childhood cancers from the 1970s to have been treated with intensive therapies, this population probably has fewer late-arising complications than might be expected for either of the latter two groups.

"The introduction of more selective and less toxic molecularly-targeted drugs holds the promise of substantially altering the acute and long-term toxic effects of cancer therapy," the editorialists write. "The potential requirement for extended treatment with these drugs may have a substantial impact on a child's development and will require careful study of late effects, similar to the ongoing efforts of the CCSS."


'/>"/>

Contact: Steve Graff
jncimedia@oxfordjournals.org
301-841-1285
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Smoking may strongly increase long-term risk of eye disease
2. Long-Term Fatigue Plagues Cancer Survivors
3. Dont Ignore Tough or Long-Term Stomach Pain
4. Shaking may cause brain damage and serious long-term effects to infants
5. Sexual function affected by stem cell transplant according to long-term study
6. Smoking can harm the long-term effects of some oral surgery procedures
7. Childhood Obesity Epidemic a Long-Term Challenge
8. Conseco to Host Follow-Up Long-Term Care Conference Call
9. New Report Finds Information Technology Essential But Not Sufficient in Long-Term Care
10. No Link Between Amateur Boxing, Long-Term Brain Damage
11. No strong evidence linking amateur boxing with long-term brain injury
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... 2017 , ... The Visiting Nurse Association (VNA) of Somerset Hills is proud ... and unique items from across the nation, this holiday-themed event will raise funds and ... the VNA. The boutique will be open Saturday, November 4 (10:00 a.m. – ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Global Healthcare Management’s 4th Annual ... in Milford, NJ. This free event, sponsored by Global Healthcare Management’s CEO, Jon ... fun run is geared towards children of all ages; it is a non-competitive, non-timed ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Talented host, actor Rob Lowe, is introducing ... new episode of "Success Files," which is an award-winning educational program broadcasted on ... subject in-depth with passion and integrity. , Sciatica occurs when the sciatic nerve ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 13, 2017 , ... “The Journey: ... faced every danger possible to save lost souls in the Philippines. “The Journey: From ... Carole is a dedicated teacher of the Bible. She has taught all ages and ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... Del. (PRWEB) , ... October 12, 2017 , ... ... and advisory services for healthcare compliance program management, will showcase a range of ... National Association for Assisted Living (NCAL) Convention and Expo to be held October ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... 11, 2017  Hill-Rom Holdings, Inc. ("Hill-Rom") (NYSE: HRC), ... in Las Piedras, Puerto Rico , ... Following a ... sustained minor structural damage, temporary loss of power and ... been completed, manufacturing operations have resumed, and the company ...
(Date:10/4/2017)... 4, 2017  South Korean-based healthcare product Development Company ... "cprCUBE" on Kickstarter. The device will educate the user ... with better efficiency compared to the dated and pricey ... on efficacy of the compression for a more informed ... goal to raise $5,000. ...
(Date:10/2/2017)... Oct. 2, 2017  AllianceRx Walgreens Prime, the combined ... Walgreens and pharmacy benefit manager Prime Therapeutics LLC (Prime), ... which included the unveiling of new signage at its ... well as at a few other company-owned facilities across ... to patients, some of whom will begin to see ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: