Navigation Links
Long-term health and social outcomes for neuroblastoma survivors
Date:7/31/2009

Survivors of the childhood cancer neuroblastoma are eight times more likely to have chronic health conditions, less likely to be married, and more likely to have lower incomes than their siblings, according to a study published online July 31 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

This study was undertaken because minimal information exists on the long-term outcomes for neuroblastoma survivors.

Caroline Laverdiere, M.D., of the Sainte-Justine Hospital in Montreal, and colleagues looked at data for 954 5-year neuroblastoma survivors who were diagnosed from 1970-1986 and enrolled in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS). Late mortality, second malignant tumors, and chronic health conditions were analyzed. The researchers also compared participants with a cohort of 3,899 siblings of children with cancer for risk of chronic health conditions and sociodemographic outcomes.

Neuroblastoma survivors were less likely to be married or employed with high income than the controls from the sibling cohort, and after 20 years follow-up, were more than eight times more likely to have chronic health conditions, such as neurological, endocrine, sensory, and musculoskeletal complications.

"[R]esults of the current study are quite relevant and underscore the need for close surveillance and life-long follow-up to ameliorate potential medical and psychosocial late effects," the authors write. "Future research should build on these data and investigate risk factors for long-term complications of neuroblastoma treatment and second malignant neoplasms"

In an accompanying editorial, Elizabeth Fox, M.D., of the Pediatric Oncology Branch at the Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, in Bethesda, Md., Deborah Citron, M.D., of the Radiation Oncology Branch at NCI, and Frank M. Balis, M.D, of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, point out that survivors who were treated with multimodal therapy in this time frame had twice as much risk of late effects as survivors who had localized neuroblastomas that could be treated with surgery alone. Because surviving neuroblastoma patients from the 1970s were less likely than both current neuroblastoma patients and survivors of other childhood cancers from the 1970s to have been treated with intensive therapies, this population probably has fewer late-arising complications than might be expected for either of the latter two groups.

"The introduction of more selective and less toxic molecularly-targeted drugs holds the promise of substantially altering the acute and long-term toxic effects of cancer therapy," the editorialists write. "The potential requirement for extended treatment with these drugs may have a substantial impact on a child's development and will require careful study of late effects, similar to the ongoing efforts of the CCSS."


'/>"/>

Contact: Steve Graff
jncimedia@oxfordjournals.org
301-841-1285
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Smoking may strongly increase long-term risk of eye disease
2. Long-Term Fatigue Plagues Cancer Survivors
3. Dont Ignore Tough or Long-Term Stomach Pain
4. Shaking may cause brain damage and serious long-term effects to infants
5. Sexual function affected by stem cell transplant according to long-term study
6. Smoking can harm the long-term effects of some oral surgery procedures
7. Childhood Obesity Epidemic a Long-Term Challenge
8. Conseco to Host Follow-Up Long-Term Care Conference Call
9. New Report Finds Information Technology Essential But Not Sufficient in Long-Term Care
10. No Link Between Amateur Boxing, Long-Term Brain Damage
11. No strong evidence linking amateur boxing with long-term brain injury
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:8/23/2017)... ... August 23, 2017 , ... MobilityWorks ®, ... named to the 2017 Inc. 500|5000, an exclusive ranking of America’s fastest-growing private ... of 139 percent, marking the twelfth year that the company has been included ...
(Date:8/23/2017)... ... August 23, 2017 , ... The non-profit ... holding an inaugural State of the Science Symposium in partnership with the Global ... 2017. , This symposium provides a forum for global leaders in human nutrition ...
(Date:8/22/2017)... , ... August 22, 2017 , ... ... pleased to announce the addition of Zack Tisch as the firm’s new Consulting ... KLAS-ranked healthcare IT consulting firm’s national accounts, from assisting clients with initial vendor ...
(Date:8/22/2017)... ... August 22, 2017 , ... “To Walk Away”: ... a B17 bomber named Edward Koontz. “To Walk Away” is the creation of published ... has published over two hundred manuscripts in chemistry and religion, as well as four ...
(Date:8/22/2017)... ... August 22, 2017 , ... ... the Founder and Managing Member for t4 Leadership Development & Consulting. He has ... his definition of “success”: physician leadership development, servant leadership, data driven process improvement, ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:8/15/2017)... -- AOTI Inc. announced today that its fully owned USA ... New York City Office in Yonkers, New York ... Oxygen (TWO 2 ) homecare therapy. This new East Coast location ... (ACHC) under the company,s DMEPOS accreditation for Home/Durable Medical Equipment Services. ... Advanced Oxygen Therapy Inc. ...
(Date:8/10/2017)... -- Physical Rehabilitation Network (PRN), acquired the long-standing outpatient rehabilitation clinic, ... . The reputable clinic will continue to be co-owned and ... staff of four clinicians. Lipkin received his doctorate in physical ... years of experience with a strong background in manual therapy. ... 10th PRN clinic in and around the Denver ...
(Date:8/7/2017)... 7, 2017 Insightin Health, provider of ... and engagement, announced the selection of Michael ... Development, effective as of February 2017. In this role, ... strategy for our clients. Wood brings with him ... and business analytics within the healthcare industry. Wood ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: