Navigation Links
Little progress made in patient safety in spite of Institute of Medicine call to action
Date:12/24/2008

Despite increased emphasis on patient safety, little progress has been made in making hospitals safer, says Johns Hopkins critical care specialist Peter Pronovost, M.D., Ph.D., in an article in the Dec. 24 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

He identifies physician autonomy and a lack of standardization of safety protocols as the culprits.

"It's been almost 10 years since the Institute of Medicine published To Err Is Human, its treatise on the need for increased patient safety initiatives at hospitals," says Pronovost. "Yet we really haven't made much progress." According to Pronovost, an average hospitalized adult will receive recommended therapy only 53 percent of the time. This accounts, in part, for the nearly 100,000 patients who die each year in the United States because of hospital error.

"Imagine," says Pronovost, "America has some of the best doctors and medicine in the world, yet we are only getting it right half of the time."

He says improvements in patient safety must incorporate three principles: First, physicians must balance their autonomy with team-based standardized care protocols. Informed decisions based on using standardized protocols will give physicians more time to spend on difficult cases, in which standardization is less effective.

Second, medical students and residents need to be trained in this new approach so they are fully socialized in their roles as patient agents rather than autonomous decision makers. They should understand that outcomes of patient care are a product of the systems and tools designed to deliver that care. To enhance trust and foster effective teamwork, students from different clinical disciplines should train together.

Third, the process by which evidence-based standards and protocols are developed should itself be standardized and made clear. If physicians are to surrender autonomy, evidence biases and uncertainties regarding the risks, benefits and costs for patients, clinicians and payers should be made explicit. Groups developing such standards should represent a diverse group of stakeholders consisting of patients, physicians, methodologists, regulators and payers to ensure that all points of views are reflected in the final products.

"Gone are the days when a doctor was on his own carrying all the tools of modern medicine in a black leather bag," Pronovost says. "Today, much of care is team based, and the wealth of techniques and wisdom is too much for one doctor to keep in his or her head. Standardization and a move away from physician autonomy will help guarantee that each patient receives the best treatment available."


'/>"/>

Contact: Eric Vohr
evohr1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Even a Little Overweight, Inactivity Hurts the Heart
2. UK kidney cancer patients face toxic, out-dated treatments with little hope of change
3. State policies have little effect on reducing minors indoor tanning use
4. Prostate cancer drug reduces testosterone levels in as little as 3 days
5. Drug to Prevent Preterm Labor Shows Little Benefit
6. Home Helpers and Veterans Express Helping Spread the Word About Little-Known Veteran's Aid and Attendance Benefit
7. The Little Gym of Fort Worth SW Introduces Kids Cheerleading Program
8. Country Super Star Taylor Swift Stays Fearless With a Little Help From Milk
9. Little-Known Fat Can Be a Heartbreaker
10. A little exercise goes a long way for severely obese
11. Hard Decisions for the Littlest Lives
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/29/2017)... Mt. Horeb, WI (PRWEB) , ... March 29, 2017 , ... ... her patients on early orthodontic treatment and accepting new pediatric patients, with or without ... can help young patients have a better orthodontic outcome and experience. When patients receive ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... ... March 29, 2017 , ... Curio Wellness , a ... the finalization of the company’s executive management team with prominent executives from both inside ... Curio Wellness’ Chief Operating Officer, Ted Dumbauld , who has more than twenty ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... ... March 29, 2017 , ... Immunotherapy has emerged as one of ... and is touted to be the next revolution in our fight against this complex ... the form of immune checkpoint inhibitors such as PD-1 and PD-L1 inhibitors. , While ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... ... March 29, 2017 , ... The Wharton School of the University of ... W’81, have made a $10 million gift to establish the Ken Moelis and ... a pathway to a Wharton MBA for highly-qualified Penn undergraduates whose academic and career ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... , ... March 28, 2017 , ... Tuesday, March 28, ... American public to take the Diabetes Risk Test to find out if they are ... Angeles World Airports will light up the evening sky by programming the LAX pylons ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:3/29/2017)... According to a new market research report "Medical Radiation Detection, Monitoring & ... Products (Personal Dosimeters, OSL, Badges), Safety (Apron, Shields, Face Mask, Gloves), End ... to reach USD 1,215.4 Million by 2021 from USD 887.0 Million in ... Continue Reading ... ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... , March 29, 2017  Maxor National Pharmacy ... announced that it has named Leah Bailey ... all divisions of the company. With more ... the previous 8 years focused on health care, Bailey ... her tenure at Prime, Bailey advised the PBM, Specialty, ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... 2017  The Pharmaceutical Care Management Association (PCMA) today ... on patient out-of-pocket spending: ... (CMS), the average amount spent out-of-pocket for drugs continues ... in 2016, down from 23% in 2006. ... a coverage problem. Health plans don,t have unlimited funds ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: