Navigation Links
Little Known on How to Best Help Kids After Trauma
Date:2/11/2013

By Amy Norton
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Feb. 11 (HealthDay News) -- When children go through a trauma -- whether it's as rare as a school shooting or as common as a car accident -- they may need therapy to help them deal with it. But new research finds that experts know little about which types of therapy actually work.

The review, of 22 published studies, found that certain forms of "talk therapy" seemed effective for some kids exposed to traumas like a natural disaster, school violence or an accident.

The best evidence was for programs offered at schools that involved cognitive behavioral therapy -- where counselors help kids talk about and change unhealthy thoughts and habits they have developed in response to the trauma.

But all in all, the published research offers little to go on, according to the review, published online Feb. 11 and in March print issue of Pediatrics.

"I was really surprised," said lead researcher Valerie Forman-Hoffman, an epidemiologist at the RTI International research institute in Research Triangle Park, N.C. "I thought we'd have all this evidence that we could synthesize to help make recommendations."

But that wasn't the case. Forman-Hoffman's team scoured more than 6,600 articles published in the medical literature. And they found only 22 studies that met their criteria for a well-designed, rigorous look at therapies for children exposed to traumatic events.

Some studies included children who'd gone through a trauma but weren't yet having symptoms of post-traumatic stress syndrome; others focused on kids who did have symptoms.

In children, post-traumatic stress can manifest in a range of ways, including difficulty sleeping, nightmares, concentration problems and worrisome reactions to reminders of the traumatic event. For example, If a child was in a car accident, the sounds of an ambulance siren, even months later, might be upsetting.

A few studies found that talk therapy seemed helpful for either preventing or treating traumatic stress. No study found that antidepressants or other medications worked.

In most cases where the findings were promising, the study looked at a school program that included some form of cognitive behavioral therapy. Forman-Hoffman said that type of intervention would typically be rolled out when there is a trauma that affects the community.

The obvious example right now would be the Sandy Hook Elementary shooting two months ago in Newtown, Conn. That tragedy has thrown a spotlight on how to best help children through a trauma, Forman-Hoffman said.

"Unfortunately, as far as what's supported by the evidence, we can't make any recommendations," she said.

Another expert agreed that evidence is lacking.

"We just don't know much," agreed Dr. Denise Dowd, who specializes in emergency care at Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics in Kansas City, Mo.

But that doesn't mean there's nothing to be done, said Dowd, who wrote an editorial published with the study.

"We do have some evidence on what's effective," she noted. "And we do have to intervene when a child is having a hard time."

Dowd added that even in the absence of evidence on formal therapies, parents themselves can make a big difference.

Kids who have a supportive parent or other adult in their lives are typically "resilient," Dowd said. "Parents should recognize the power of their own nurturing. You don't need published research evidence to know that's important."

Of course, some children do develop lingering problems after a trauma. It's not clear how often that happens, study author Forman-Hoffman said, and a lot depends on the individual child.

Kids with a history of anxiety or depression, for example, seem to be at increased risk of post-traumatic stress. The same is true of children with chronic stress in their lives -- like living in poverty or suffering maltreatment or abuse.

There are a lot of questions about when and how to intervene, Forman-Hoffman said. Do you offer help to all children who've been exposed to a trauma, like a school shooting or a tornado? Or do you wait until some kids have developed traumatic stress symptoms and intervene only with them?

One thing that's unclear, Forman-Hoffman noted, is whether any therapies have negative effects. Could some children do worse because they are having to "relive" the trauma? That's a particularly important question when it comes to therapies intended to prevent kids from developing symptoms.

"You do not want to do them harm, of course," Forman-Hoffman said.

"Most children exposed to a non-chronic trauma will do fine," Dowd said. But she and Forman-Hoffman both said it's important to step in when children are having problems weeks to months after the trauma. Often, kids will only start having obvious symptoms at that point.

You can start by talking with your child about the event and how they are feeling. If you think your child is struggling, Dowd said, talk to your pediatrician or other provider.

The review focused on children who'd lived through natural disasters or "man-made" traumas like community violence. So, it does not say anything about therapies for kids suffering chronic traumas like abuse or neglect, Forman-Hoffman noted.

More information

Find out more about childhood traumatic stress from the National Child Traumatic Stress Network.

SOURCES: Valerie Forman-Hoffman, Ph.D., M.P.H, research epidemiologist, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, N.C.; Denise Dowd, M.D., M.P.H., emergency and urgent care, Children's Mercy Hospital and Clinics, Kansas City, Mo.; March 2013 Pediatrics


'/>"/>
Copyright©2012 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. A little tag with a large effect
2. Little House books Mary Ingalls probably did not go blind from scarlet fever, U-M study says
3. Could Being a Little Overweight Help You Live Longer?
4. Tumor boards linked to little association with effects on cancer care
5. Little evidence to support TB interventions in real-world, low-resource settings
6. Celebrating Little Girls – Children’s Brand mimvail Announces Debut Collection
7. Dr. Jason Littleton Selected for Special Episode of Dr. Oz Show Aired on December 13, 2012.
8. Despite hype, costly prostate cancer treatment offers little relief from side effects
9. Is Your Little One Scared of Santa?
10. Too Little Sleep Spurs Appetite-Boosting Hormones: Study
11. Too Much or Too Little Activity Can Spur Knee Problems
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Little Known on How to Best Help Kids After Trauma
(Date:1/23/2017)... ... January 23, 2017 , ... ... (IHCA/INCAL), will serve as a healthcare industry expert at the 2017 Sector Summit ... moderated by Inside Indiana Business host Gerry Dick, will feature an employer and ...
(Date:1/23/2017)... ... January 23, 2017 , ... Old School Labs™, makers of the wildly popular ... bodybuilder Breon Ansley to its growing team of brand ambassadors. The Olympia top finisher ... in less than a year was able to turn professional, participating in the 2013 ...
(Date:1/23/2017)... ... January 23, 2017 , ... The ... at seafoodnutrition.org/programs and seafoodnutrition.org/resources to assist in teaching communities and individuals about ... been developed for use by nutrition educators and influencers within the public ...
(Date:1/22/2017)... Boca Raton, FL (PRWEB) , ... January 22, 2017 , ... ... products to customers across the world, recently met with big-name retail buyers at the ... strong scientific evidence of efficacy and uses the utmost safety standards in all of ...
(Date:1/21/2017)... Viejo, California (PRWEB) , ... January 21, 2017 , ... "ProDOF is the perfect set ... one subject to another subject in a scene," said Christina Austin - CEO of Pixel ... a given scene. Easily create the illusion of a DSLR racking focus from one ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/23/2017)... -- The global  anxiety disorders and depression treatment market  is expected ... of depression worldwide is anticipated to drive the market growth in the coming ... for antidepressants in the recent years. Continue Reading ... ... ...
(Date:1/23/2017)... InDex Pharmaceuticals Holding AB (publ) today announced that the company ... Crohn,s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). The ECCO congress is the largest ... disease (IBD). The congress is held in Barcelona, Spain ... ... selected to present data at the largest IBD congress in the ...
(Date:1/21/2017)... India , January 20, 2017 According ... Type (Descriptive, Prescriptive), Application (Marketing, R&D, Compliance, SCM), Component (Software, Service), ... - Forecasts to 2021" published by MarketsandMarkets, the market is expected ... in 2016, at a CAGR of 13.3% during the forecast period. ... ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: