Navigation Links
Leukemia inhibitory factor may be a promising target against pancreatic cancer
Date:6/19/2012

LAKE TAHOE, Nev. Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest forms of cancer, defying most treatments. Its ability to evade therapy may be attributable to the presence of cancer stem cells, a subset of cancer cells present in pancreatic tumors that drive tumor growth by generating bulk tumor cells. Cancer stem cells are notorious for their ability to resist traditional chemotherapies.

However, scientists at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), have discovered that two proteins KRAS and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) help create cancer stem cells and that the latter can be targeted to block them.

These results were presented at the American Association for Cancer Research's Pancreatic Cancer: Progress and Challenges conference, held here from June 18-21.

In many different types of tumors, a constitutively active, mutant form of the signaling protein KRAS helps drive the uncontrolled tumor cell proliferation that is a hallmark of cancer. In fact, more than 90 percent of pancreatic cancers exhibit KRAS mutations, but the link between KRAS and cancer stem cells has been tenuous until now.

Using human pancreatic cancer cell lines and mouse fibroblasts and pancreatic cancer cells, Man-Tzu Wang, Ph.D., a postdoctoral researcher in the McCormick lab at the Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCSF, and colleagues showed that KRAS causes cells to acquire and maintain stem cell-like properties.

"We know that KRAS is a very potent driver of pancreatic cancer, but we don't know how to drug it," said Wang. "Our results showed we can block KRAS-mediated cancer stem cells by blocking LIF activity."

KRAS is difficult to target therapeutically. Taking the next logical step, the researchers began looking for proteins that function downstream of KRAS in the generation of pancreatic cancer stem cells to determine if any of them could be potential drug targets. They found a number of candidates but focused on LIF, a protein known to regulate stem cell development. Moreover, they found that LIF is "druggable," making it a potential target for treatment.

Using neutralizing antibodies or shRNA, the team knocked down LIF activity or expression and found that each reduced the in vitro stem cell-like properties of mouse pancreatic cancer cells.

"We think our data indicate that blocking LIF can bring a significant improvement to cancer treatment," Wang said.

Knocking down cancer stem cells is critically important. Because these cells are slow-growing, they are often resistant to traditional chemotherapies, which target fast-growing cells. In addition, they also contain mechanisms that pump drugs out of the cell. Their survival allows them to continue to differentiate into mature cancer cells, leading to recurrent tumors.

Though there are no drugs currently available that target LIF, Wang is hopeful that these new data will spur the development of such products and generate new pancreatic cancer therapies.


'/>"/>

Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Inhibitors of shuttle molecule show promise in acute leukemia
2. Marker distinguishes more-aggressive from less-aggressive forms of chronic leukemia
3. Child CT Scans Might Up Risk of Brain Cancer, Leukemia
4. Researchers identify a life-and-death molecule on chronic leukemia cells
5. New drug strategy attacks resistant leukemia and lymphoma
6. Inherited DNA change explains overactive leukemia gene
7. VCU Massey Cancer Center sees potential in novel leukemia treatment
8. A microRNA prognostic marker identified in acute leukemia
9. Study identifies potential treatment for lethal childhood leukemia
10. Therapy exploits addiction of leukemia cells
11. Study Shows New Option for Kids With Tough-to-Treat Leukemia
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:9/22/2017)... HOUSTON, Texas (PRWEB) , ... September 22, 2017 ... ... leading network of independent freestanding emergency rooms is celebrating the one year anniversary ... anniversary of our facility opening,” said Dr. Otinwa, Facility Medical Director of First ...
(Date:9/22/2017)... ... September 22, 2017 , ... Silicon ... effectively even on the go. Their electric toothbrushes aggressively attack oral bacteria by ... UV sanitizing technology. Combining leading edge Enke technology with a premium timeless design, ...
(Date:9/22/2017)... ... ... “Letters From Home”: a moving compilation of letters that remind readers of ... Home” is the creation of published author, John Allred, a passionate leader of ministry ... International, who has traveled and ministered on four continents. , “It is my hope ...
(Date:9/22/2017)... ... September 22, 2017 , ... ... create life. Although frozen embryos have a slight statistical advantage for live births, ... is a wonderful opportunity for women undergoing medical treatment or who are concerned ...
(Date:9/21/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... September 21, 2017 , ... With ProSlideshow ... fun and easy to do. Users can select from up to two layers of ... a click of a mouse all within Final Cut Pro X. , ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/19/2017)... a venture-backed medical device company developing a non-invasive, robotically assisted, platform therapy that uses pulsed ...   ... Jim Bertolina, ... Tom Tefft ... medical device executive Josh Stopek , PhD, who has led R&D and business development ...
(Date:9/18/2017)... Mich. , Sept. 18, 2017  PMD Healthcare ... Specialty Pharmacy of Kalamazoo, Mich. , ... hub service that expedites and streamlines patient and provider ... PD 2.0, and wellness management services.  ... device used to measure lung function for a variety ...
(Date:9/13/2017)... 2017   OrthoAtlanta has been named the official ... Committee (AFHC) for the 2018 College Football Playoff (CFP) National ... Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia . OrthoAtlanta ... In" campaign, participating in many activities leading up to, and ... ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: