Navigation Links
Learning from old bones to treat modern back pain
Date:2/28/2011

The bones of people who died up to a hundred years ago are being used in the development of new treatments for chronic back pain. It is the first time old bones have been used in this way.

The research is bringing together the unusual combination of latest computer modelling techniques developed at the University of Leeds, and archaeology and anthropology expertise at the University of Bristol.

With Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) funding, spines from up to 40 skeletons housed in museums and university anatomy collections are being analysed in the research.

The data generated, on different spine conditions and on how spines vary in size and shape, is playing a key role in the development of innovative computer models. This will enable the potential impact of new treatments and implant materials (such as keyhole spinal surgery and artificial disc replacements) to be evaluated before they are used on patients.

Ultimately, it will also be possible to use the models to pinpoint the type of treatment best suited to an individual patient.

Minister for Universities and Science David Willetts said:

"Back pain is an extremely common condition, but everyone has a slightly different spine so developing new treatments can be a real challenge. This investment could significantly improve quality of life for millions of people around the world, so it's fantastic that the research is being carried out in the UK. It's also truly fascinating that old bones and very new technology can come together to deliver benefits for patients."

This is the first software of its kind designed for the treatment of back conditions. The research will also speed up the process of clinical trials for new treatments, which currently can take up to ten years.

The data provided by the old bones will be used to supplement similar data collected from bodies donated to science, which are limited in number and mainly come from older age groups.

"The idea is that a company will be able to come in with a design for a new product and we will simulate how it would work on different spines. The good thing about computer models is that we can use them over and over again, so we can test lots of different products on the same model", says Dr Ruth Wilcox, from the University of Leeds, who is leading the project. "If we were doing this in a laboratory we would need many new donated spines each time we wanted to test a treatment out".

This computer modelling breakthrough is possible thanks to recent advances in micro-CT (computed tomography) scanning, and to new techniques developed at the University of Leeds enabling data from micro-CT scans to be transformed into sophisticated computer models. Computed tomography (CT) scans use X-rays to build up 3-dimensional images from multiple cross-sectional pictures of body organs or tissues.

"The wider the pool of spinal data at our disposal, the more effective the computer models will be in terms of demonstrating the impact of treatments on different back conditions and back types," says Dr Kate Robson Brown from the University of Bristol's Archaeology and Anthropology Department. "The computer modelling software should be available for testing newly developed products and treatments in the next few years and along the way this cutting-edge research could even provide new insight into how our ancestors evolved!"


'/>"/>

Contact: EPSRC Press Office
pressoffice@epsrc.ac.uk
44-179-344-4404
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Bilingual People More Adept at Learning Third Language
2. Learning causes structural changes in affected neurons
3. Better learning through handwriting
4. Learning the language of bacteria
5. Nicotine exposure in pregnant rats puts offspring at risk for learning disabilities
6. U of M researchers find learning in the visual brain
7. Children with high blood pressure more likely to have learning disabilities
8. Sleep Appears to Aid Learning
9. Could learning self-control be enjoyable?
10. Clinical trials can be improved by managing the learning curve
11. Adiposity hormone, leptin, regulates food intake by influencing learning and memory
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/23/2017)... ... January 23, 2017 , ... Wooden and plastic balance boards have been around since ... balance. Kumo Board is the first and only balance board to use a ... soft and rigid at the same time as well as skill-level adjustable for all ages ...
(Date:1/23/2017)... , ... January 23, 2017 , ... Sharon Kleyne, America’s ... air to educate listeners about the benefits of making new water infrastructure a number ... said, “it’s appropriate that we expect water infrastructure to become a top priority of ...
(Date:1/23/2017)... ... 23, 2017 , ... Zachary Cattell, President of the Indiana ... industry expert at the 2017 Sector Summit hosted by Ivy Tech Community College ... Gerry Dick, will feature an employer and an association representative from five of ...
(Date:1/23/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Moisture measurement is a necessary process step ... to success. Selecting an inappropriate measurement method can cause costly errors, and poor ... equipment. Rare or expensive substances are wasted and production may even be stopped ...
(Date:1/23/2017)... California (PRWEB) , ... January 23, 2017 , ... "ProRandom is a set of camera ... to create dynamic looks in Final Cut Pro X," said Christina Austin - CEO of ... up to two layers of text with video footage. ProRandom works by using a ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/21/2017)... , Jan. 20, 2017 ResMed (NYSE: RMD ... ( Winter Haven, Florida ) today announced they have ... BMC and 3B will be permitted to sell their existing products ... a one-time settlement payment to 3B to close the ... not include an admission of liability or wrongdoing by any party. ...
(Date:1/21/2017)... Research and Markets has announced the addition ... Technology, Route Of Administration, End User - Forecast to 2025" ... ... at a CAGR of around 7.8% over the next decade to ... report analyzes the global markets for Advanced Drug Delivery across all ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... , Jan. 20, 2017  Ethicon Endo-Surgery, ... Megadyne Medical Products, Inc., a privately held ... markets electrosurgical tools used in operating rooms ... of Ethicon,s* advanced energy devices with Megadyne,s ... major step forward in Ethicon,s goal to ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: