Navigation Links
Large study reveals increased cancer risks associated with family history of the disease
Date:7/24/2013

A family history of cancer increases the risk of other members of the family developing not only the same cancer (known as a concordant cancer) but also a different (discordant) cancer, according to a large study of 23,000 people in Italy and Switzerland.

The research, published in the leading cancer journal Annals of Oncology [1] today (Thursday), provides a comprehensive picture of the risk of developing various different types of cancer in families where there is a history of the disease, and is one of the few large studies of this kind that takes into account other important factors, such as individual characteristics and lifestyles, that could affect the degree of risk as well.

Results from the study supported known associations, such as the increased risk of developing the same cancer as a close relative, and the 1.5-fold increased risk of breast cancer in women with a history of colorectal cancer in the family. However, the study also found a 3.3-fold increased risk of developing oral and pharyngeal cancer among people who had a first-degree relative with cancer of the larynx, and a four-fold increased risk of cancer of the gullet (oesophageal cancer) where a first-degree relative had oral or pharyngeal cancer. If a first-degree relative had breast cancer, female family members had a 2.3-fold increased risk of ovarian cancer. Family members had a 3.4-fold increased risk of prostate cancer if a first-degree relative had bladder cancer.

The researchers from Italy, Switzerland and France looked at 12,000 cases of cancer occurring in 13 different cancer sites (mouth and pharynx, nasopharynx, oesophagus, stomach, colorectum, liver, pancreas, larynx, breast, womb, ovaries, prostate and kidneys) between 1991 and 2009. They matched them with 11,000 people without cancer, and collected information on any cancer in the family, particularly in a first-degree relative, age at diagnosis, sociodemographic characteristics, body shape, lifestyle habits such as smoking and alcohol intake, diet, personal medical history, including menstrual and reproductive factors, and use of oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy.

Dr Eva Negri, head of the Laboratory of Epidemiologic Methods at the Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research, Milan, Italy, said: "Besides confirming and quantifying the well-known excess risks of people developing the same cancer as their first-degree relative, we have identified increased risks for developing a number of different cancers. We have also found that if a patient was diagnosed with certain cancers when they were younger than 60, the risks of a discordant cancer developing in family members were greater.

"A major strength of our study is that we were able to adjust our analyses for tobacco, alcohol and a number of other lifestyle habits, which most previous studies have not been able to do."

Dr Negri said that some of the associations between discordant cancers were probably due to shared environmental factors such as family habits of smoking and drinking. However, she said: "Our results point to several potential cancer syndromes that appear among close relatives and that indicate the presence of genetic factors influencing multiple cancer sites. These findings may help researchers and clinicians to focus on the identification of additional genetic causes of selected cancers and on optimizing screening and diagnosis, particularly in people with a family history of cancer at a young age."

She said that the large numbers of patients in the study enabled the researchers to identify associations even for some rare cancers.

"For some rare cancers, a weak association with a different, common cancer can, on a population level, reveal a higher attributable risk than a strong association with the risk of developing the same cancer. For example, for ovarian cancer we found that a family history of breast cancer had a stronger attributable risk of ovarian cancer than the far rarer, albeit stronger, association with family history of ovarian cancer."

The researchers are still collecting data on the people they are studying, including biological material, which could help them to identify genetic factors that could be playing a role in the increased risk for people with a family history of cancer. They also plan to investigate whether some well-recognised risk factors are involved in increasing the risk to family members of developing concordant or discordant cancers, and if so, to what extent.


'/>"/>

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
European Society for Medical Oncology
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. FlipOver.org Mobilizes Social Entrepreneurship Through Crowdsourcing Agreement with Indonesia’s Largest Youth Organization
2. Large UK population study finds no increased cancer risk in children born after assisted conception
3. UIC to serve as Chicago site for largest-ever US study of Hispanic/Latino health
4. Market Authority to Release White Paper That Provides Key Strategies for Large Directional Media/Print Companies
5. CyraCom Ranked Amongst the World’s Largest Language Services Providers
6. Smart ERP Solutions Moves Headquarters to New Larger Location
7. North America Leads the Largest Market Share of the Bioinformatics Market Says New Research Report by MarketsandMarkets
8. Challenge of Champions, the Largest Martial Arts Tournament of its Kind in the World, to be Held in Edison, New Jersey
9. Showers Positioned to Replace Bathtubs in Large Hotel Chains – On Trend with Bathroom Remodeling Industry
10. Deadly Super Bug Controlled in Large Study of Hospitals
11. Time and Gems Offers Buyers the Largest Collection of Rolex Watches Yet
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/23/2017)... PHILADELPHIA (PRWEB) , ... February 23, 2017 , ... ... risk and uncertainty in clinical trials, today announced that Premier Research, a leading ... management solution. , Clinical trials are becoming increasingly complex, due in part to ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... RI (PRWEB) , ... February 23, 2017 , ... ... today a new partnership with the Rhode Island Consortium for Autism Research and ... an opportunity for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to see films in ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Top cosmetic and periodontal dentist Dr. Mahnaz Rashti ... Indiegogo campaign . Individuals are now able to contribute to the local initiative, ... as a participating patient or through an Indiegogo donation. The entirety of proceeds will ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... ... ... Thomas Vas-Don suffered from severe injury due to an industrial ... recover. In “ Origin & Insertion Charts for Massage Therapists ” (published by Xlibris ... anatomy , trigger points and referral pain patterns . , In this ...
(Date:2/22/2017)... NY (PRWEB) , ... February 22, 2017 , ... ... life and athletics. It’s enough to overwork even the sharpest brain. , Power ... offer peak healthy activity without over clocking the brain. Each capsule contains Cognizin® ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/23/2017)... Ga., Feb. 23, 2017  MiMedx Group, Inc. (NASDAQ: ... tissue and patent-protected processes to develop and market advanced ... Spine, Sports Medicine, Ophthalmic, and Dental sectors of healthcare, ... and full year ended December 31, 2016. ... Revenue is a 31% increase over full year 2015 ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... , Feb. 23, 2017 LG Innotek today announced that ... sterilization applications. As its sterilization performance is 1.5 times higher than ... wavelength ultraviolet rays in the range of 200 -- 280nm, allowing it ... bacteria by destroying their DNA. LG Innotek,s product emits UV in ... ...
(Date:2/23/2017)... , Feb 23, 2017 Research and ... Devices Market Analysis & Trends - Industry Forecast to 2025" ... ... grow at a CAGR of around 9.2% over the next decade ... report analyzes the market estimates and forecasts for all the given ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: