Navigation Links
Landmark Study Published in New England Journal of Medicine
Date:6/9/2009

New York Hospital Queens One of Clinical Sites, Research Director is Co-Author

FLUSHING, N.Y., June 9 /PRNewswire/ -- One of the world's most respected medical journals, the New England Journal of Medicine, is publishing a landmark study this week that explores treatments for people with both Type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. The Lang Research and Education Center of New York Hospital Queens was one of the sites that conducted this study.

The study, known as BARI 2D, (Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes) was also presented yesterday in New Orleans at the American Diabetes Association 69th Scientific Sessions -- a national medical conference. The results demonstrated that there is no difference in mortality among patients with type 2 diabetes and stable heart disease who received prompt bypass surgery or angioplasty compared to drug therapy alone. The results also showed that while prompt bypass in patients with more severe heart disease did not lower mortality, it lowered their risk of subsequent major cardiac events.

Phyllis August, M.D., M.P.H., director, Lang Research Center for Research and Education, New York Hospital Queens, served as a co-investigator and co-author of the study. She called the results, "very exciting and good news." "More than 20 million Americans suffer from type 2 diabetes and many of these people also have heart disease. This deadly disease duo is affecting more and more people at increasingly younger ages."

According to Dr. August, the message to patients is a strong one; "you can modify this disease with careful attention to prevention, managing risk factors and by following your doctor's instructions."

"The study's results provide needed guidance about which approaches can best help these patients," said August. They also indicate that when a patient with type 2 diabetes has more severe heart disease it may be better to do bypass surgery early than to wait and simply treat with medication. For patients with milder disease who are candidates for angioplasty, it is appropriate to treat with drug therapy first."

Background

The BARI 2D study began recruiting patients in 2001. The results are based on 2,368 patients with both type 2 diabetes and stable heart disease who were under a physician's care to control their cholesterol and blood pressure. Patients were randomized to receive drug therapy plus undergo prompt revascularization to restore blood flow -- either angioplasty to open blocked arteries or bypass surger -- ?or to receive drug therapy alone. The investigators also looked at which of two diabetes drug treatment strategies resulted in better outcomes -- insulin-providing (increasing the amount of insulin) or insulin-sensitizing (lowering the body's resistance to its own insulin, such as metformin or rosiglitazone). The study was not a comparison between angioplasty and bypass surgery, but rather a comparison between a prompt procedure and medical therapy alone.

The results show that five-year survival rates did not differ significantly between the revascularization group (88.3 percent) and the drug therapy group (87.8 percent). In addition, there was no significant difference in survival between those who received insulin-providing drugs (87.9 percent) and those who received insulin-sensitizing drugs (88.2 percent). However, in the group that received bypass surgery, the rate of all major cardiovascular events (heart attacks, strokes and death) was significantly lower (22.4 percent) compared to those who received drug therapy alone (30.5 percent). This benefit appeared to be greatest in those who underwent bypass and received insulin-sensitizing drugs.

BARI 2D was coordinated by the Epidemiology Data Center at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health and involved 49 clinical sites in the United States and abroad, including The Lang Research and Education Center of New York Hospital Queens, Flushing Queens. Major funders of the study include the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and GlaxoSmithKline.

Note: Reporters interested in obtaining a copy of the Abstract and Editorial from the New England Journal of Medicine, June 11, 2009, or to interview Dr. August, who also holds a prominent position with the Weill Medical College of Cornell University, please contact Scott Sieber at 718-670-1579.

Contact: Scott Sieber, 718-670-1579


'/>"/>
SOURCE New York Hospital Queens
Copyright©2009 PR Newswire.
All rights reserved

Related medicine news :

1. CAP Joins Landmark Lawsuit Challenging Legality of Myriad Genetics Gene Patents
2. Landmark USGS study
3. Oakwood Investment Triggers the Development of a New Landmark in Downtown East Dearborn
4. Landmark study demonstrates Gamunex improves health-related quality of life in patients with CIDP
5. Landmark NBC News Nutrition Report: There Is Indeed Little Difference Between High Fructose Corn Syrup and Table Sugar
6. In the Midst of a National Nurse Shortage Crisis ... Nurses Celebrate Landmark Legal Settlement That Will Help Ensure Fair Compensation & Bring More RNs to the Bedside
7. Innovative Plans by Major Arizona-Based Developer Sparks Landmark Energy Conservation Legislation in Multiple States to Urge Federal Action at Wall Street Journal Conference This Week with Gore, Google CEO & T. Boone Pickens
8. Patton Boggs Wins Landmark Insurance Case for Client
9. Landmark Policy Report: Many Cancers Could Be Prevented Across the Globe
10. Landmark Report: Many Cancers Could be Prevented
11. Update on Landmark Study on Single-Payer as Economic Stimulus
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... April 28, 2016 , ... The ... successful events, attracting medical professionals from around the globe who attended a week’s ... Opening Ceremonies Sunday, April 17 included the introduction of the 2016 ARRS Distinguished ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... Portland, Maine (PRWEB) , ... April 28, 2016 , ... ... of death and principal determinant of childhood mortality. This is particularly true in underdeveloped ... A lecture at the University of New England’s campus in Tangier, Morocco, will examine ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... April 28, 2016 , ... ... at VitaFoods 2016. , Nominated in the Healthy Ageing category, Cognizin® is being ... safety. The Healthy Ageing division can include everything from antioxidants, lipids, proteins, and ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... ... April 28, 2016 , ... The American Society for ... developers of the AnzuMedical™ Knowledge Sharing and Collaboration Platform™ , today announced ... platform is scheduled to launch in July 2016 and will be a combined ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... PA (PRWEB) , ... April 28, 2016 , ... ... Browne, M.D. has been named a Top Doc in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation ... conjunction with Castle Connolly Medical, Ltd. by randomly surveying physicians and medical leadership ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/29/2016)... BERLIN , April 29, 2016 ... world-leading glyco-biology expertise, today announces the appointment of Dr. ... Dr. Zurlo is an oncologist with many years ... pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. His last role was at ... Member of the Executive Board. Previously Dr. Zurlo held ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... 2016 Automation is one of ... to the growing demands for productivity in speed, accuracy, ... systems are already adept of a wide range of ... manual labor. Instrumentation continues to evolve, and is poised ... a few years ago. Originally used mostly by the ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... Mich. , April 28, 2016   ... . Diplomat Pharmacy, Inc. (NYSE: DPLO), the nation,s ... has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Valley ... Specialty Pharmacy ("TNH"), a leading specialty pharmacy that ... Van Nuys, California . In 2015, TNH ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: