Navigation Links
LSUHSC research finds protein that protects cancer cells from chemo and radiation therapy

New Orleans, LA Research led by Daitoku Sakamuro, PhD, Assistant Professor of Pathology at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans and the LSUHSC Stanley S. Scott Cancer Center, has identified a protein that enables the activation of a DNA-repair enzyme that protects cancer cells from catastrophic damage caused by chemo and radiation therapy. This protein, called c-MYC oncoprotein, can initiate and promote almost all human cancers and discovering the role it plays in cancer treatment resistance may lead to advances that save lives. The work is published in the March 29, 2011 issue of Science Signaling, a publication of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Although scientists have known that cancer cells can acquire resistance to DNA-damaging therapeutic agents, the genetic mechanisms through which this occurs have remained unclear until now.

Using the chemotherapy drug, cisplatin (which is commonly used as a first-line therapy for various cancers) to design a set of experiments, the research team found that the c-MYC oncoprotein increases cisplatin resistance by decreasing production of a c-MYC inhibitor called BIN1. BIN1 suppressed an enzyme essential for DNA repair, and the sensitivity of cancer cells to cisplatin depended upon BIN1 abundance. Overproducing the c-MYC oncoprotein repressed BIN1, blocking its life-saving action.

"Our study provides a potent and novel mechanism through which cancer acquires resistance to DNA damage," notes Dr. Sakamuro. "Inhibition of oncogenic c-MYC may provide an attractive strategy for cancer therapy in combination with DNA-damaging agents."

The researchers also propose that analyzing the levels of the c-MYC and BIN1 proteins or their mutational status may also serve as a valuable prognostic marker to determine whether a cancer will respond to an aggressive dose of therapeutic agents.

According to the American Cancer Society, about 1,529,560 new cancer cases were expected to be diagnosed in the United States in 2010, excluding noninvasive cancers as well as basal and squamous cell skin cancers. Cancer accounts for nearly one quarter of the deaths in the US with an estimated 569,490 cancer deaths expected last year.

"Our study will determine how we can re-sensitize malignant cancer cells to conventional DNA-damaging therapeutic agents and how we can minimize unnecessary side effects associated with cytotoxic chemo and radiation therapy," adds Dr. Sakamuro.


Contact: Leslie Capo
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

Related medicine news :

1. LSUHSC research shows emotional stress can change brain function
2. APA gives LSUHSC psychiatry gold award for program in St. Bernard schools after Katrina
3. LA Tumor Registry at LSUHSC awarded $12 million SEER contract by NCI
4. LSUHSC study finds early predictors of metabolic syndrome in healthy 7-9 year-olds
5. Researchers: Sexually active teens need confidential health care
6. Researchers develop a halometer that tests alterations in night vision
7. ESCEO-AMGEN Fellowship awarded to Swedish and Argentinean researchers
8. Mouse Sperm Successfully Grown in Lab, Researchers Say
9. Boston University School of Medicine professor receives award for quality of care research
10. Mayo Clinic researchers find cardiac pacing helps epilepsy patients with ictal asystole
11. Researchers explore new treatments to end OA
Post Your Comments:
(Date:12/1/2015)... ... 2015 , ... Trustify is proud to announce the success of the seventh ... organization dedicated to ending domestic violence. , Trustify and Becky’s Fund have joined forces ... of domestic violence. Trustify is also proud to announce the launch of the company’s ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... ... December 01, 2015 , ... Henderson, ... Tennessee to receive Gigabit Internet through a partnership this year with Aeneas Internet ... Henderson is an attractive destination for entrepreneurs who want to build a business. ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... ... December 01, 2015 , ... According to an ... has filed a discrimination claim against the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, ... Care Act (ACA) plans are breaking the clause in the law prohibiting the denial ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... ... December 01, 2015 , ... Speech and ... believe that with innovative technologies and under the right circumstances, these practices can ... benefit of a dual-approach to his or her therapeutic sessions, as well as ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... ... 2015 , ... It’s official: Tattoo taboo is a thing of the past. ... Millennials (a whopping one in three aged 18 to 25 is inked). As tattoos ... their ink. In fact, RealSelf , the world’s largest community for learning and ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/1/2015)... 1, 2015 Contraceptives ... Contraceptives, Male Condoms, Female Condoms, Intrauterine Devices, ... Diaphragms, Contraceptive Sponges, Non-Surgical Permanent Contraception Devices) ... Trends and Forecast 2014 - 2020 ", ... (TMR).The report states that the global contraceptives ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... 2015   MabVax Therapeutics Holdings, Inc . (OTCQB: ... has filed an Investigational New Drug Application (IND) with ... Company,s lead fully human antibody product HuMab 5B1 as ... to initiate the Phase I clinical trial early in ... The planned Phase I trial will evaluate the ...
(Date:12/1/2015)... 2015  InCarda Therapeutics, Inc. (InCarda), a privately-held biopharmaceutical ... for cardiovascular conditions via the inhalation route, today announced ... Australia . InCarda is planning to undertake ... in the first half of 2016. The ... in Adelaide and Melbourne.  In ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: