Navigation Links
Kids of Deployed Parents May Face Mental Health Risks
Date:5/20/2011

By Kathleen Doheny
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Children whose parents are deployed in Afghanistan or Iraq face a higher risk of psychiatric problems requiring hospitalization, a new study indicates.

Researchers from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences tracked over 375,000 children, aged 9 to 17, whose parents were on active duty between 2007 and 2009.

"There was a 10 percent increased risk of hospitalization among children 9 to 17 whose parents were deployed," said Dr. Jeffrey Millegan, disaster and preventive psychiatry fellow at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.

He presented the finding this week at the American Psychiatric Association's annual meeting in Honolulu.

In all, the investigators found that 2,533 children in the study were hospitalized for a mental or behavioral health problem, staying a median of eight days.

Of that, about one-third, or 858 children, had parents who were deployed during the study period.

After taking into account factors such as past history of psychiatric problems, Millegan arrived at the 10 percent increased risk. When he looked at the parents' length of deployment, he found the link only held up when the parent was gone longer than six months.

More attention needs to be paid to the mental health of children of active duty military parents when they are deployed, the researchers said.

What can parents do to lessen the impact? While resilience research is still in its infancy, Millegan suggested that family doctors should ask parents about to be deployed how their children are doing.

Parents and others who are aware of the risk, he said, may better catch mental health problems when they are less serious than those needing hospitalization.

The study was deemed novel by Dr. Jeffrey Borenstein, chair of the American Psychiatric Association's Council on Communications, who moderated the Monday news conference announcing the findings.

"There really hasn't been this kind of research up until now on the effect on the children," he said. Previous research has linked a parent's deployment to war with increased anxiety and behavioral problems in their children.

Borenstein said the finding about length of deployment having an effect on the child's mental health was of particular interest. With further research, he said, the number of times a parent is deployed would likely be found to have an effect, too.

For now, he said, the research can help inform those involved and alert them to try to minimize the risk.

Millegan also found that children with a past history of mental health problems were more likely to have them again. The civilian parent's past psychiatric history also affected the child's risk of hospitalization for mental health problems.

The increased mental health problems, Millegan said, are likely related to the obvious family disruption that occurs when a major caregiver leaves for a period of time.

Other research has found that mental health issues can affect both the deployed parent and the parent who stays home, suggesting there could be a trickle-down effect. "It's quite clear that [the mental health issues faced by the parents] can have an influence on the children," he said.

Because this study was presented at a medical meeting, the data should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

To learn more about how to help children with deployed parents, visit Our Military Kids.

SOURCES: Jeffrey Millegan, M.D., M.P.H., disaster and preventive psychiatry fellow, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Md.; Jeffrey Borenstein, M.D., chair, Council on Communications, American Psychiatric Association; May 16, 2011, presentation, American Psychiatric Association annual meeting, Honolulu


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Families of Deployed Military Carry Heavy Load
2. Kids of Deployed Soldiers May Face More Mental Health Woes
3. Children of combat-deployed parents show increased worries, even after parent returns
4. Desire to Please Parents Motivates Kids at School
5. ADHD Drug Shortage Has Patients, Parents Scrambling
6. Parents Fighting Can Even Affect Infants: Study
7. Parents Limited English May Prolong Childs Hospital Stay
8. Football Legend Steve Young Urges Kids, Parents to Play It Safe
9. Parents have role in smoking prevention
10. U.S. Parents Want Kids More Active During School Day: Poll
11. Most Parents Vaccinate Kids, Trust Docs Advice on Shots
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Kids of Deployed Parents May Face Mental Health Risks
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... October 13, 2017 , ... Ellevate Network, the leading network for professional women, ... towards gender equality at their inaugural Summit in New York City in June. The ... social audience of over 3 million. To watch the Mobilize Women video, click ...
(Date:10/13/2017)... ... ... “The Journey: From the Mountains to the Mission Field”: the story of a ... “The Journey: From the Mountains to the Mission Field” is the creation of published ... all ages and currently teaches a class of ladies at her church, which she ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... 2017 , ... The company has developed a suite of ... authorities worldwide. From Children’s to Adults 50+, every formula has been developed by ... , These products are also: Gluten Free, Non-GMO, Vegan, Soy Free, Non-Dairy*, Preservative ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... Dr. Parsa ... contributed a medical article to the newly revamped Cosmetic Town journal ... the hair transplant procedure known as Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE). , ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Health Literacy Innovations (HLI), creator of the ... the Cancer Patient Education Network (CPEN), an independent professional organization that shares best ... alliance. , As CPEN’s strategic partner, HLI will help support CPEN members ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... Oct. 11, 2017  True Health, a leader ... its effort during National Breast Cancer Awareness month ... risks. Research ... calculated that more than 10 million American women ... in BRCA1 or BRCA2 and have not had testing. ...
(Date:10/5/2017)... Ill. , Oct. 5, 2017  In ... Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS) released ... opioids – to be used as a first-line ... pain. Recognizing ... the AAOMS White Paper "Opioid Prescribing: Acute and ...
(Date:10/2/2017)... 2, 2017  Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: ... the third quarter of 2017 on Tuesday, October 24, ... that day with the investment community and media to ... conference call will begin at 9 a.m. Eastern time. ... live webcast of the conference call through a link ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: