Navigation Links
Kids Specializing in One Sport More Likely to Get Hurt: Study
Date:5/2/2011

By Amanda Gardner
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, May 2 (HealthDay News) -- Kids who focus on one sport to the exclusion of others end up getting injured more often, new research suggests.

In fact, those who devoted themselves to only one athletic pursuit were almost twice as likely to get hurt as those who played multiple sports, said senior study author Dr. Neeru Jayanthi, medical director of primary care sports medicine at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine.

"We saw a pretty significant difference with this intensity of training, along with specialization," said Jayanthi. The findings are slated to be presented Monday at the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine annual meeting in Salt Lake City. Research presented at medical meetings should be viewed as preliminary.

"It's been accepted for the last five years or so that kids who are not super-specific do better. They're cross-trained, so they're conditioned for other movements," said Dr. Kory Gill, an assistant professor at Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine.

Jayanthi's team had done research earlier on 519 junior tennis players that found those who only played tennis were more likely to be hurt.

But that was just one sport, and Jayanthi wanted to extend the findings to other athletic activities.

"As a physician, you get frustrated seeing kids come in with injuries that keep them out for two to three months. It's devastating," said Jayanthi, who recently saw a young gymnast with a knee injury which will keep her off the mat for at least three months.

Here, the researchers looked at 154 young athletes, average age 13, who played a variety of sports. Eighty-five of the participants came to the clinic for treatment for a sports injury, while 69 were just getting sports physicals.

The investigators then ranked each athlete on how specialized they were, basing the score on such factors as how often they train in one sport (75 percent was considered specialized), whether or not they had given up other sports to concentrate on one, and whether they train eight months a year or compete more than six months a year in one sport.

As it turned out, 60.4 percent of the athletes who had been injured were considered specialized, compared with only 31.3 percent of those who came for physicals.

Kids who came to the clinic with injuries played organized sports an average of 11 hours a week, compared with fewer than nine hours in the uninjured group.

Although the researchers did not specifically look at this, Jayanthi said he has noticed that more highly specialized sports such as tennis, gymnastics and dance tend to be linked to more severe overuse injuries.

Why do the injuries occur?

"One reason is repetitive use of the same muscle group and stressors to growing areas, for example, the spine," explained Jayanthi, who stressed that the findings were preliminary. His team, in collaboration with Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago, plans to enroll more athletes in follow-up research, and those athletes will be evaluated every six months for three years, to look more closely at how intense training can affect a young athlete's body during growth spurts.

"Second is exposure risk," he added. "If you're getting really good at one sport, the intensity increases because you are getting better. People are developing adult-type sports skills in a child's body. The growing body probably doesn't tolerate this."

Younger children -- those who have not entered high school -- tend to be especially vulnerable as their bodies are still growing, said Gill, who recommended that kids cross-train and condition for other movements, or just play another sport.

"I tell parents to let kids be kids and play multiple sports," he said. "See what they're good at and what they enjoy." By high school, when bodies are more mature, specializing is safer, he added.

More information

For more on high school sports injuries, visit the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

SOURCES: Neeru Jayanthi, M.D., medical director, primary care sports medicine, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, Chicago; Kory Gill, D.O., assistant professor, Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, and physician, Texas A&M Physicians, Bryan; May 2, 2011, presentation, American Medical Society for Sports Medicine, annual meeting, Salt Lake City


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Senator Janis Lee Sponsors Senate Resolution Supporting Kevin Saunders for Chairman of the President's Council on Physical Fitness & Sports
2. Health & Sports: Former NBA Star John Salley Endorses STEMTech Stem Cell Nutrition Products
3. Connor Sport Court Lays the Ground for NBA All-Star Jam Session Presented by Adidas
4. MIT's Center for Transportation & Logistics Announces new Environmental Performance Consortium at Annual Crossroads Conference
5. With Record Registration of 13,000 Runners to Date, the 2010 Dicks Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon Announces a Cap of 16,000
6. New Insurance Membership Program Protects Washington State Families Against High Cost of Emergency Medical Transports
7. ASAP Systems Pioneers the Use of Built-In Video Help on their Passport Inventory, Stock, Warehouse Management System and Asset Tracking Software
8. SportsDirect Inc. and Enetpulse Form Global Sports Information Alliance
9. Shoulder Dislocations a Sports Hazard
10. MatchMySport.com Aims to Reduce Obesity Levels Through Sports Participation by Finding Sports Partners/Players/Teams
11. LazyTown Sportacus and Michelle Obama moves Washington DC
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Kids Specializing in One Sport More Likely to Get Hurt: Study
(Date:12/9/2016)... ... December 09, 2016 , ... Flottman Company is a ... As a means of expanding capabilities Flottman has added a G&K Vijuk TTM ... professional inserts (PIs) and patient package inserts (PPIs) that will marry with all ...
(Date:12/9/2016)... ... December 09, 2016 , ... The Justin Veatch Fund ... (NCADD) is recommending the film Whispering Spirits and its discussion guide ... Columbia as an education tool in the war against teen drug abuse. NCADD ...
(Date:12/9/2016)... ... ... An inventor from Cana, Va., wanted to fulfill the need for a device ... The patent-pending SAFETY STRAP FOR AMPUTEES improves accessibility. It eliminates discrimination. It is also ... a matter of minutes, or even seconds. The SAFETY STRAP FOR AMPUTEES is a ...
(Date:12/9/2016)... Fort Lee, NJ (PRWEB) , ... December 09, ... ... the 2016 Founders Ball at The Pierre Hotel in New York, NY, on ... 700 friends, benefactors, dignitaries and physicians attended the annual event, which raised over ...
(Date:12/9/2016)... , ... December 09, 2016 , ... "I had a ... inventor from Winchester, Va. "I thought that if the nebulizer had a more child-friendly ... than fearing them." , He developed the patent-pending NEBY to avoid the need to ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:12/9/2016)... , Dec 9, 2016 Research and ... Market 2016-2020" report to their offering. ... The global travel vaccines market to ... The report covers the present scenario and the growth prospects ... market size, the report considers the revenue generated from the sales ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. , Dec. 8, 2016 ... it intends to offer newly issued shares of common stock, ... "Shares") pursuant to an underwritten public offering.  The final terms ... at the time of pricing, and there can be no ... completed. IRIDEX expects to use the net proceeds ...
(Date:12/8/2016)... LONDON , Dec. 8, 2016  The global ... of 8.8% during the forecast period of 2016 to ... billion by 2021 from USD 18.21 billion in 2016. ... surgeries, rising incidences of sports related injuries and spinal ... and rising need of effective blood loss management. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: