Navigation Links
Kids Not So Stuck on Sugary Breakfast Cereals, Study Finds
Date:12/13/2010

By Randy Dotinga
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Dec. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Getting kids to happily eat nutritious, low-sugar breakfast cereals may be child's play, researchers report.

A new study finds that children will gladly chow down on low-sugar cereals if they're given a selection of choices at breakfast, and many compensate for any missing sweetness by opting for fruit instead.

The 5-to-12-year-olds in the study still ate about the same amount of calories regardless of whether they were allowed to choose from cereals high in sugar or a low-sugar selection. However, the kids weren't inherently opposed to healthier cereals, the researchers found.

"Don't be scared that your child is going to refuse to eat breakfast. The kids will eat it," said study co-author Marlene B. Schwartz, deputy director of Yale University's Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity.

Nutritionists have long frowned on sugary breakfast cereals that are heavily marketed by cereal makers and gobbled up by kids. In 2008, Consumer Reports analyzed cereals marketed to kids and found that each serving of 11 leading brands had about as much sugar as a glazed donut. The magazine also reported that two cereals were more than half sugar by weight and nine others were at least 40 percent sugar.

This week, food giant General Mills announced that it is reducing the sugar levels in its cereals geared toward children, although they'll still have much more sugar than many adult cereals.

In the meantime, many parents believe that if cereals aren't loaded with sweetness, kids won't eat them.

But is that true? In the new study, researchers offered different breakfast cereal choices to 91 urban children who took part in a summer day camp program in New England. Most were from minorities families and about 60 percent were Spanish-speaking.

Of the kids, 46 were allowed to choose from one of three high-sugar cereals: Froot Loops, Frosted Flakes and Cocoa Pebbles, which all have 11-12 grams of sugar per serving. The other 45 chose from three cereals that were lower in sugar: Cheerios, Rice Krispies and Kellogg's Corn Flakes. They all have 1-4 grams of sugar per serving.

All the kids were also able to choose from low-fat milk, orange juice, bananas, strawberries and extra sugar.

The study findings appear in the January issue of Pediatrics.

Taste did matter to kids, but when given a choice between the three low-sugar cereals, 90 percent "found a cereal that they liked or loved," the authors report.

In fact, "the children were perfectly happy in both groups," Schwartz said. "It wasn't like those in the low-sugar group said they liked the cereal less than the other ones."

The kids in both groups also took in about the same amount of calories at breakfast. But the children in the high-sugar group filled up on more cereal and consumed almost twice as much refined sugar as did the others. They also drank less orange juice and ate less fruit.

Len Marquart, an associate professor of food science and nutrition at University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, said the study findings "confirm for people that their choices in the cereal aisle do make a difference."

"The biggest challenges are taste and marketing. In the morning, kids are sleepy and cranky, and it's hard to get them to sit down and eat breakfast," he said. "The sugar cereals marketed with flash and color and cartoon characters help get kids to the kitchen table when nothing else seems to work. And, we have to be realistic, they do like the taste of presweetened cereals."

But one solution is to be creative, he said. "Take Cheerios and put some strawberries and vanilla yogurt on top, and that's going to taste better than any presweetened cereal anyway," Marquart said.

More information

There's more on children's nutrition at the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

SOURCES: Marlene B. Schwartz, Ph.D., deputy director, Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, Yale University, New Haven, Conn.; and Len Marquart, Ph.D., R.D., associate professor of food science and nutrition, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, Minneapolis. January 2011 Pediatrics.


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Fewer Sugary Drinks, Less High Blood Pressure
2. Sugary sports drinks mistakenly associated with being healthy, say UTHealth researchers
3. Women Who Drink Sugary Beverages Raise Risk of Gout
4. Less is more, when it comes to sugary, high-caffeine energy drinks, researchers say
5. San Diego Unified School District Awarded Silent Hero Grant From got breakfast?(R) Foundation
6. Increased Government Scrutiny of Companies That Use Independent Contractors, Consultants, or Freelancers: Are You Ready? Learn More at Complimentary Breakfast Briefing
7. Musts For Mom: Breakfast In Bed And Beautiful Flowers
8. Despite Treatment, Employees with Depression Generate Higher Absentee Costs, According to Thomson Reuters Study
9. American Council on Exercise (ACE) Study Reveals Kettlebells Provide Powerful Workout in Short Amount of Time
10. TV drama can be more persuasive than news program, study finds
11. Study carried out into biological risks of eating reptiles
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Kids Not So Stuck on Sugary Breakfast Cereals, Study Finds
(Date:10/13/2017)... , ... October 13, 2017 , ... “The Journey: From ... every danger possible to save lost souls in the Philippines. “The Journey: From the ... is a dedicated teacher of the Bible. She has taught all ages and currently ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... Planet Fitness, one of the largest ... its plans to open a flagship location in Covington, LA at 401 N. U.S. ... Go store next to Office Depot in the Holiday Square shopping center. Its location ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... Asante, a nationally ... care, have expanded their existing home health joint venture through an agreement, effective ... operating a joint venture home health company with Asante, delivering clinically integrated care, ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... Leading pediatric oncology experts at Children’s National ... 49th Congress of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) Oct. 12-15. ... for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Children’s National, and Stephen P. Hunger, M.D., ...
(Date:10/12/2017)... ... October 12, 2017 , ... In the ... a year. In some states—like New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Texas, Virginia, Connecticut, ... retirement havens have extremely low property-tax rates, which contributes to the relatively lower ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:9/28/2017)... -- Hill-Rom Holdings, Inc. (NYSE: HRC), will host its ... on Friday, November 3, 2017, beginning at 7:00 a.m. ... 8:30 a.m. (CDT) / 9:30 a.m. (EDT). ... and guidance for 2018, Hill-Rom executives will also highlight ... and long-range financial outlook through 2020. ...
(Date:9/27/2017)... and NEW YORK , Sept. 27, 2017  DarioHealth ... and big data solutions, today announced that its MyDario product is expected ... local TV listings for when The Dr. Oz Show airs in your ... The nine-time Emmy ... ...
(Date:9/23/2017)... Sept. 22, 2017 Janssen Biotech, Inc. (Janssen) ... letter from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ... sirukumab for the treatment of moderately to severely active ... clinical data are needed to further evaluate the safety ... active RA. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: