Navigation Links
Kidney failure under the microscope
Date:12/16/2012

Better targeted treatments for 20 per cent of renal failure patients are on the horizon following a key discovery about the role of white blood cells in kidney inflammation.

In a study published today in Nature Medicine, researchers from Monash University tracked the movements of white blood cells, or leukocytes, leading to a new understanding of their behaviour in both healthy and diseased kidneys.

Leukocytes play important protective roles in the body's immune system, but in some cases they cause damaging inflammation. Glomerulonephritis is an inflammatory disease of the kidney that can lead to the need for transplantation or regular dialysis. More than 20 per cent of end-stage renal failure cases result from glomerulonephritis.

Lead researcher, Associate Professor Michael Hickey of the University's Centre for Inflammatory Diseases in the Department of Medicine said the team used advanced microscopy techniques to visualise the movements of leukocytes through the kidney.

"In order to manipulate a system, you must understand it. Now, we have a really clear understanding of the disease process and the molecules involved in the key steps," Associate Professor Hickey said.

"Contrary to conventional medical and scientific opinion, we found that leukocytes are constantly circulating through and patrolling the blood vessels within healthy kidneys. It was previously believed that they only arrived in the kidney during the development of disease. That's not the case. However, during disease they linger in the kidney during the course of their normal journey, become agitated and cause inflammation and kidney damage."

End-stage renal failure leads to significant health and personal impacts, including ongoing visits to a dialysis unit several times a week, or a significant wait for a donor.

Renal Physician and co-investigator Professor Richard Kitching said therapies to effectively target glomerulonephritis were needed before end-stage was reached.

"The treatments we have can be fairly effective, but they are non-specific and they often have unacceptable side effects," Professor Kitching said.

"Currently, we have to suppress the immune system to combat the inflammation and this immunosuppression leaves the body more prone to infections. Additionally, some of the drugs have metabolic side effects, such as weight gain and bone thinning.

"Now we have a better understanding of how the disease develops, we can identify targets for more specific drugs, with fewer side-effects."

The Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry reported that 19,000 Australians had end-stage kidney failure at the end of 2010.


'/>"/>

Contact: Monash Media
media@monash.edu
61-399-034-840
Monash University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Herbal Remedy Ingredient Tied to Cancer, Kidney Failure
2. Specific inhibition of autophagy may represent a new concept for treatment of kidney cancer
3. Kidney cancer patients do better when whole kidney is not removed, U-M study shows
4. Role of Screening, Monitoring in Early Kidney Disease Unclear
5. Kidney Cancer Patients Fare Better With Tumor Removal Only
6. Donor Kidney Re-Used in Second Patient After Failing in First
7. Routine Kidney Disease Screening Not Worthwhile, Experts Say
8. Surprising results for use of dialysis for kidney failure in developing world
9. Everyday fish oil capsule may provide kidney-related benefits
10. First, Second Kidney Transplants Have Similar Success: Study
11. Women fare better than men, but need more blood after kidney cancer surgery
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/26/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2016 , ... ... Retinal Degeneration” for the Foundation Fighting Blindness, Long Island Chapter on June 4, ... the public. , Dr. Maisel, founder of Retina Group of New York ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... ... to provide hair restoration information to the widest possible audience, Dr. Parsa Mohebi is making ... app. Dr. Mohebi, the founder of Parsa Mohebi Hair Restoration, is making all of his ... says, “The positive response to the Snapchat videos we started last month has been overwhelming. ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... Indianapolis, Indiana (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2016 ... ... national provider of healthcare supply chain solutions, today announced the organization has earned ... management meets international standards and is compliant with all rules and policies associated ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... ... The Lung Institute has partnered with the Gulfcoast North Area ... at their clinic in downtown Tampa. The class is complimentary for the public. Register ... a free downloadable 4 Week Smoking Cessation Guide for those who are ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... ... a multitude of activities from daily practices, arts & crafts, discussions, and games ... Amber East-D’Anna and Christy Evans have combined backgrounds in kids’ yoga, collegiate sport ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/25/2016)... IRVINE, Calif. , May 25, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... of testing for their new reference materials that ... workflows from sample collection to analyses. The rapid ... the demand for researchers to have standard methods ... data being generated. Biases inherently exist at every ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... According to market research "Global ... Demand Forecast to 2022 - Industry Insights by Type ... by P&S Market Research, the global insulin delivery device ... it is expected to grow at a CAGR of ... segment is expected to witness the fastest growth at ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... , May 25, 2016  Granger Diagnostics today announced ... for wounds and infections. This test ensures discovery ... select viruses. The test requires only a simple swab ... David G. Bostwick , MD, Chief ... facilitate wound healing: "We are excited to make ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: