Navigation Links
Key protein may explain the anti-aging and anti-cancer benefits of dietary restriction
Date:5/21/2009

A protein that plays a key role in tumor formation, oxygen metabolism and inflammation is involved in a pathway that extends lifespan by dietary restriction. The finding, which appears in the May 22, 2009 edition of the on-line journal PLoS Genetics, provides a new understanding of how dietary restriction contributes to longevity and cancer prevention and gives scientists new targets for developing and testing drugs that could extend the healthy years of life.

The protein is HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor 1). It helps cells survive by "turning on" when oxygen levels are low. HIF-1 is also active in some forms of human cancer. HIF-1 overexpression is frequently detected in solid tumors; inhibition of HIF-1 has been proved to be an efficient way to prevent cancer growth. Now, scientists at the Buck Institute for Age Research have shown that HIF-1 is also a key player in dietary restriction. HIF-1 is involved in a molecular pathway known to regulate cell growth and metabolism in response to nutrients and growth factors.

"Previous studies on HIF-1 have mainly focused on its roles in oxygen metabolism and tumor development", said Buck faculty member Pankaj Kapahi, PhD, lead author of the study.

Kapahi says the study encourages the investigation of HIF-1 in nutrient sensing pathways. "The data in this study also points to HIF-1 as a likely target for regulating the protective effects of dietary restriction in mammals," said Kapahi.

"Dietary restriction is one of the most robust methods for extending lifespan and delaying age-related disease among various species."

Kapahi says the molecular mechanisms involved in how dietary restriction slows cancer and extends lifespan have been largely unknown. "This study gets us closer to understanding that process and gives us better targets for both designing and testing drugs which could mimic the effects of dietary restriction in humans," said Kapahi.

The research involved nematode worms that were genetically altered to both under and over-express HIF-1. The animals, which are the most-often used model to study aging, were fed different diets. Animals that were designed to over-express HIF-1 did not get the benefit of lifespan extension even though their diets were restricted. Animals that under-expressed HIF-1 lived longer, even when they had a nutrient-rich diet. Furthermore, it was found that the lifespan extension resulting from dietary restriction required activity in signaling pathways in the endoplasmic reticulum, the part of the cell involved in processing and the proper folding of proteins. This finding supports the theory that aging stems from the effects of misfolded proteins and opens up a rich area of investigation to examine the mechanisms by which stress in the endoplasmic reticulum affects lifespan.


'/>"/>

Contact: Kris Rebillot
krebillot@buckinstitute.org
415-209-2080
Buck Institute for Age Research
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Protein May Hold Key to Blocking Allergy-Induced Asthma
2. Protein that suppresses androgen receptors could improve prostate cancer diagnosis, treatment
3. Fear Response May Stem From Protein in Brain
4. Researchers identify key proteins needed for ovulation
5. Protein Might Mute Effects of Methamphetamine
6. Omega Protein Reports 2009 First Quarter Results
7. Protein Sciences Corporation Appoints New Board of Directors
8. Upside-down world: DNA protecting protein helps cancer drug to kill cells
9. Novel role of protein in generating amyloid-beta peptide
10. Scripps research scientists model 3D structures of proteins that control human clock
11. Key protein in cellular respiration discovered
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... ... Connecticut Dermatology Group (CDG) is proud and excited to welcome back to ... Kim brings an extensive background in cutting-edge dermatology care and research to Connecticut’s largest ... Dr. Kim to the CDG team” said President and Managing Partner Dr. Steven A. ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... January 19, 2017 , ... Infinity® Massage Chairs announced today ... implement new sales and marketing strategies. Grover comes with a total of 15 years ... a half years as Executive Vice President of Direct Sales at Traeger® Wood Pellet ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... ... January 18, 2017 , ... A recent video posting ... global discussion about the benefits of fidgeting to relieve stress and anxiety. No ... Their Think Ink Pen had just completed a successful Kickstarter campaign raising $67,000 ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... ... January 18, 2017 , ... ... of Bioengineering are collaborating on a research project focused on multiple sclerosis (MS). ... seeks to use nanotechnology to control the disease without compromising normal immune function ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... ... January 18, 2017 , ... A Palm Beach doctor plans to run ... international charity that provides free surgery to poor children suffering from cleft lip and ... I have run to support the efforts of the American Heart Association and the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:1/18/2017)... 18, 2017  Adaptive Sound Technologies, Inc. (ASTI), the leading ... with Hyatt Place Nashville/Downtown to deliver the best sleep ... therapy machines in over two hundred of its guest ... parts of having a great stay is sleeping well," ... Place Nashville/Downtown. "We,re pleased to be able to offer ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... , Jan. 18, 2017  Dermata Therapeutics, ... products to treat a variety of dermatological diseases, ... compound DMT210, in a Phase 2 acne rosacea ... to downregulate the proinflammatory cytokines in the skin ... acne rosacea. This clinical trial, ...
(Date:1/18/2017)... The report " Automated Breast Ultrasound System (ABUS) Market ... End User (Hospitals, Diagnostic Imaging Centers), Industry Analysis Report, Regional Outlook (U.S., ... , Germany , UK, France , ... , China , Japan , ... Saudi Arabia , UAE, South Africa ), ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: