Navigation Links
Key leukemia defense mechanism discovered by VCU Massey Cancer Center
Date:9/30/2010

Richmond, Va. (September 30, 2010) Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center researcher Steven Grant, M.D., and a team of VCU Massey researchers have uncovered the mechanism by which leukemia cells trigger a protective response when exposed to a class of cancer-killing agents known as histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs). The findings, published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, could lead to more effective treatments in patients with leukemia and other cancers of the blood.

"Our findings provide new insights into the ways such cancer cells develop resistance to and survive treatment," says Grant, associate director for translational research and professor of medicine. "This knowledge will now allow us to focus our efforts on strategies designed to prevent these self-protective responses, potentially rendering the cancer cell incapable of defense and increasing the effectiveness of therapy."

The discovery centers on modification of a protein known as NEMO. Researchers have known for some time that HDACIs trigger a protective response in leukemia cells by activating a survival signaling pathway known as NF-κB, which limits the ability of HDACIs to initiate a cancer cell suicide program known as apoptosis. However, it was previously thought this process occurred through activation of receptors residing on the cancer cell surface. What VCU Massey researchers discovered was that HDACIs initially induce DNA damage within the cell nucleus, leading to modification of the NEMO protein, which then triggers the cytoprotective NF-κB pathway. By disrupting modifications of the NEMO protein, NF-κB activation can be prevented, and as a consequence, the cancer-killing capacity of HDACIs increases dramatically.

HDACIs represent an approved form of treatment for certain forms of lymphoma, and VCU Massey Cancer Center has been working for over seven years to develop strategies designed to improve their effectiveness in leukemia and other blood cancers. Grant's team is now focusing on ways to capitalize on this discovery by designing strategies that interrupt NEMO modifications through the use of pharmacologic agents and other means.

"Our goal is to move these findings from the laboratory to the bedside as quickly as we possibly can. There are currently several drugs in early stages of development that hold promise in disrupting the NEMO-related NF-κB pathway, but further research defining their safety and effectiveness will be required before we can incorporate them into new therapies," says Grant.


'/>"/>

Contact: John Wallace
wallacej@vcu.edu
804-628-1550
Virginia Commonwealth University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Researcher at Childrens Hospital LA discovers way to overcome radiation resistance in leukemia
2. Experimental Leukemia Drug Proves a Slam Dunk
3. New driver of T cell leukemia growth
4. Targeted agent shows promise for chronic lymphoid leukemia
5. Technique to preserve fertility in young women may be unsafe for patients with leukemia
6. UCSF-led team discovers familial link in rare childhood leukemia
7. Research consortium at CHLA receives $410,000 to study leukemia and lymphoma
8. Stem cell transplantation of therapy-resistant chronic leukemia successful
9. Combination therapy targets stubborn leukemia stem cells
10. Gene loss causes leukemia
11. Genetic Pattern May Predict Leukemia Relapse
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... ... Footwear Foundation, the national charitable foundation serving the footwear industry, has broken all ... representing more than 130 companies across 23 states during the months of April ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... The American ... productivity, stability, even security. Most importantly, employees are the single most important asset ... American workers so unhappy? , Just under half of American workers are emotionally ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... A new ... with severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia have better survival rates if surgery is performed ... (CDH)—a condition where the diaphragm fails to form completely, letting abdominal organs into ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... April 29, 2016 , ... The Gluten-Free Certification Program (GFCP), ... announce the launch of the GFCP Scoop in response to consumer ... of the GFCP Scoop site is to keep the gluten-free community ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... ... For those who skip meals occasionally (which is pretty much everyone), two ... new lifestyle diet tips offered by nutritionists Pam Bonney and Priya Lawrence of Tried ... Bonny and Lawrence noted that because proper nutrition, including water, provides energy during the ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/29/2016)... India , April 29, 2016 ... the life science laboratory due to the growing demands ... by advance technology, contemporary automated systems are already adept ... performed by slow, tedious and manual labor. Instrumentation continues ... were not even conceivable just a few years ago. ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... 2016 Dr. ... und Stephen Schmidt werden ... ArisGlobal®, ein führender Anbieter cloudbasierter Softwarelösungen für ... dass neue Führungskräfte zum Team Sicherheit und ... vielfältige Erfahrungen mitbringen.  Dies wird die Geschäftseinheit ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... Oramed Pharmaceuticals Inc. (NASDAQ: ... on the development of oral drug delivery systems, announced today ... conference, presented by Joseph Gunnar & Co. LLC, ... York . Nadav Kidron , CEO of Oramed, ... Presentation Details:   PIONEERS 2016, presented by ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: