Navigation Links
Katrina's Aftermath: Failed Pregnancies for IVF Moms Nationwide
Date:10/18/2011

By Maureen Salamon
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Hurricane Katrina's devastating effects six years ago appear to have extended beyond the Gulf Coast, with miscarriages and premature births among fertility patients rising markedly across the United States in the months after the disaster.

Researchers tracked outcomes for nearly 105,000 single-baby pregnancies among women who had undergone assisted reproductive technology (typically in vitro fertilization) across the country before and after the storm hit in August 2005.

The team found that pregnancies begun in the 18 months before the calamity were 87 percent less likely to end in a first-trimester miscarriage, compared to ART-assisted pregnancies initiated after the storm.

Pregnancies that began in the months and weeks before Katrina were also significantly less likely to result in extreme prematurity -- babies born before 26 weeks of gestation -- than conceptions occurring after the event.

After adjusting for other contributors to poor pregnancy outcomes, including patient age, infertility diagnosis and sperm source, the researchers also found that fertility patients across the United States were 63 percent less likely to suffer a miscarriage within the first four months of a pregnancy if their pregnancies had begun before Hurricane Katrina rather than after.

Stress may be the key here, experts said.

"We in the infertility field have always been concerned about the effects of stress or grief on reproductive success," said Dr. Mary Wood-Molo, medical director of the Center of Advanced Reproductive Care at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, who was not involved in the study. "On some level I'm not surprised by this . . . with media exposure that continued to focus on the crisis and aftermath, it became more of a national crisis than a local crisis."

The findings, from data compiled by the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology, are scheduled to be presented Oct. 19 at the annual meeting of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine in Orlando, Fla. Studies presented at scientific meetings are preliminary and have not undergone peer review.

Study authors were surprised that the pregnancy loss rate among those analyzed was the same across the country, not just in the areas affected by the storm.

Adding to the puzzle was the fact that the pregnancy failure rate remained the same pre- and post-Katrina in those counties directly affected by the hurricane.

Study lead author Sangita Jindal said that finding likely stems from other factors. "In the Gulf area, there was already an elevated preterm delivery rate and Katrina didn't affect that," noted Jindal, an assistant professor of obstetrics/gynecology and women's health at Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Hartsdale, N.Y. "I'm not sure what causes that compared to the rest of the country, but perhaps there are population disparities."

Wood-Molo and Jindal agreed that infertility patients endure so much stress trying to become pregnant and carry babies to term that the additional stressor of a natural disaster can make them more susceptible to poor outcomes.

"These women may or may not have underlying metabolic or physical issues related to their infertility," Jindal said, "so as a population they may be more sensitive . . . and may not be as robust. So when they get pregnant, it's a little more tenuous."

More information

There's more on infertility treatment at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

SOURCES: Sangita K. Jindal, Ph.D., assistant professor, OB/GYN and women's health, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Hartsdale, N.Y.; Mary Wood-Molo, M.D., medical director, Center of Advanced Reproductive Care, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago; abstract, "Increase in ART-Conceived Miscarriage and Pre-Term Birth Rates Following Hurricane Katrina," presented at annual meeting, American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Orlando, Fla., Oct. 19, 2011


'/>"/>
Copyright©2010 ScoutNews,LLC.
All rights reserved  

Related medicine news :

1. Cancer Society Says U.S. Report Failed to Prove Health Risks
2. PCBs Might Be Linked to Failed IVF Attempts
3. Fertility Clinic Shows Support for Healthy Pregnancies By Sponsoring March of Dimes "March for Babies"
4. Women with gestational diabetes have increased risk of recurrence in subsequent pregnancies
5. Anorexia Linked With Unplanned Pregnancies
6. Closely Spaced Pregnancies Might Up Autism Risk: Study
7. Multiple Pregnancies May Up Risk of Obesity, Diabetes: Animal Study
8. Immediate use of an IUD following abortion more likely to prevent unintended pregnancies
9. Kids From Unplanned Pregnancies Tend to Lag Behind Intellectually
10. Unintended Pregnancies Rising Among Poorer U.S. Women: Study
11. CVS/pharmacy Begins Free Health Screenings in Communities Nationwide Through A Su Salud Program
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Katrina's Aftermath: Failed Pregnancies for IVF Moms Nationwide
(Date:6/26/2016)... ... June 26, 2016 , ... Brent Kasmer, a legally blind and certified personal trainer is helping ... fitness app. The fitness app plans to fix the two major problems leading the fitness ... size fits all type program , They don’t eliminate all the reasons people ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... , ... June 25, 2016 , ... The temporary closing of Bruton Memorial Library on ... Observer , brings up a new, often overlooked aspect of head lice: the parasite’s ability ... fumigation is not a common occurrence, but a necessary one in the event that lice ...
(Date:6/25/2016)... ... June 25, 2016 , ... ... non-athletes recover from injury. Recently, he has implemented orthobiologic procedures as a method ... —Johnson is one of the first doctors to perform the treatment. Orthobiologics are ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... ... Those who have experienced traumatic events may suffer from a complex set ... drug or alcohol abuse, as a coping mechanism. To avoid this pain and suffering, ... traumatic event. , Trauma sufferers tend to feel a range of emotions, from depression, ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... ... June 24, 2016 , ... Global law firm Greenberg Traurig, ... Elite. The attorneys chosen by their peers for this recognition are considered among the ... Traurig Shareholders received special honors as members of this year’s Legal Elite Hall of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:6/26/2016)... , June 27, 2016  VMS Rehab Systems, Inc. ... will take whatever measures required to build a strong ... which is currently listed on the OTC Markets-pink current ... Chairman and CEO, "We are seeing an anomaly in ... understand, not only by the Company, but shareholders and ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... 24, 2016   Bay Area Lyme Foundation ... Dean Center for Tick Borne Illness , Harvard ... MIT Hacking Medicine, University of California, Berkeley, and ... the five finalists of Lyme Innovation , ... than 100 scientists, clinicians, researchers, entrepreneurs, and investors ...
(Date:6/24/2016)... and SAN CLEMENTE, Calif. , June 24, 2016 ... mobile pulmonary function testing company, is now able to perform sophisticated ... by ndd Medical Technologies , Inc. Patients ... hospital-based labs.  Thanks to ndd,s EasyOne PRO ® , ARL patients ... get any needed testing done in the comfort of her own ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: