Navigation Links
Johns Hopkins researchers turn off severe food allergies in mice
Date:10/1/2010

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins scientists have discovered a way to turn off the immune system's allergic reaction to certain food proteins in mice, a discovery that could have implications for the millions of people who suffer severe reactions to foods, such as peanuts and milk.

The findings, published online in the journal Nature Medicine, provide hope that the body could be trained to tolerate food allergies that lead to roughly 300,000 emergency room visits and 100 to 200 deaths each year.

The research team, led by Shau-Ku Huang, Ph.D., a professor of medicine, and Yufeng Zhou, M.D., Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow in the Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, discovered that one kind of immune cell in the gastrointestinal tract called lamina propria dendritic cells (LPDC) considered the first line of defense for a body's immune system expresses a special receptor, SIGNR1, which appears on the cells' surface and binds to specific sugars.

By targeting this receptor using sugar-modified protein, researchers were able to keep food proteins that would have induced a severe, even deadly, allergic reaction from causing any serious harm.

"There is no cure for food allergies, and the primary treatment is avoidance of the offending protein," Zhou says. "This could teach our bodies to create a new immune response and we would no longer be allergic to the protein."

The researchers hope to confirm whether this promising process in mice can also occur in people.

Food allergies are triggered by the immune system and, in some people, can cause severe symptoms or even a life-threatening reaction known as anaphylaxis. In the United States, it is estimated that six to eight percent of children under the age of three and nearly four percent of adults have food allergies, and the prevalence is rising. Because of the extreme difficulty in avoiding all food allergen exposure and the lack of effective treatments, preventive and therapeutic strategies are urgently needed, Zhou says.

In the laboratory, Zhou and his colleagues took a food protein that causes allergies in mice and modified it by adding special sugars. They hypothesized that, when ingested by the mice, the modified proteins would be able to bind to what are known as the SIGNR1 receptors on the immune system cells. Bound in this way, the immune system would learn to tolerate the modified food protein and the protein would no longer induce an allergic reaction, even when consumed in its unmodified form.

Zhou fed his mice the modified protein once a day for three days. Five days later, he tested them by feeding them the protein in its unmodified form. Another group of mice was not fed the modified protein at all. The severity of the allergic response to the unmodified protein which in the control-group mice tended to be tremors, convulsions and/or death was significantly decreased in those mice that had been pre-fed the modified protein. Some still had minor reactions like itchiness or puffiness around the eyes and snout, but none had serious ones. These mice appeared to be desensitized to the food protein, even when it was fed to them in its unmodified form, says Zhou. In this model, SIGNR1 plays a key role in shutting off some responses in the immune cells, but whether this is the only function of this receptor is, at present, unknown.


'/>"/>

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Kilimani Sesame has positive impact on children in Tanzania: Johns Hopkins University study
2. Pro Ana Versus Pro Recovery Sites: New Study by Johns Hopkins and Stanford University raises concerns.
3. Johns Hopkins provost honored with international award
4. Johns Hopkins to Unveil Center for Biotechnology Education
5. Level of frailty predicts surgical outcomes in older patients, Johns Hopkins researchers find
6. Johns Hopkins School of Medicine enters collaboration with New York Stem Cell Foundation
7. Cancer research award to Johns Hopkins basic scientist
8. Johns Hopkins Health System Acquires Imorgon Ultrasound PACS Product
9. SC Johnson and Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Unite to Combat Malaria
10. Johns Hopkins Launches “Energy Policy and Climate” Master's Degree
11. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Launches New Scholars, Fellows & Leadership Programs Web Site
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... February 08, 2016 , ... Eating ... a significant number of women and men with eating disorders report a history ... best predicts the development of an eating disorder. , At the 2016 ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... February 08, 2016 , ... FileHold's document management software has ... a cloud hosted environment for FileHold software that is pay per user subscription-based ... applications using the FileHold web services API. DocuSyst also advises clients on fully ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... ... the Rocky Mountain region’s longest running and impressive garden and home show where you ... the most incredible gardens and home improvement experts that attend this amazing show. ... 700 14th St. Denver CO, is an exciting event that Performance Mobility has enjoyed ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... February 08, 2016 , ... GrassrootsHealth published data ... of type 2 diabetes in the GrassrootsHealth cohort with substantially higher vitamin D ... change in public health,” states Carole Baggerly, Director of GrassrootsHealth, “the safety ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... ... 2016 , ... The Association of Home Care Coding & ... Health and Hospice ICD-10 Transition Workgroup are working closely with the American Hospital ... to address concerns over the use of 'A' as the seventh character indicating ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:2/5/2016)...  As people age, it is natural to be ... and tests that are linked with certain age milestones ... majority of aging individuals, hearing health is too frequently ... million American adults who report some trouble hearing, there ... health a 2016 healthy aging priority.[1] Cochlear ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... VENICE, Fla. , Feb. 5, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... Centers , is the first of its kind ... of undesired tattoos through advanced laser treatment. The ... Florida,s Suncoast by storm with ... video consultations, and advanced multi-wavelength Astanza Trinity technology. ...
(Date:2/5/2016)... MELVILLE, N.Y. , Feb. 5, 2016  Henry ... of health care products and services to office-based dental, ... has entered into an agreement to acquire a majority ... dental supplies and equipment in Brazil ... Headquartered in Blumenau, Brazil, Dental Cremer is the dental ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: