Navigation Links
'It costs too much to be healthy'
Date:5/2/2011

DENVER The high cost of health care is deterring parents from taking their children to the doctor or buying prescription medication, regardless of how much money they make or whether they have health insurance, according to a study to be presented Sunday, May 2, at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting in Denver.

Previous research has shown that families who have difficulty paying their medical bills may delay or forgo needed care. In this study, researchers sought to determine factors that affect families' decisions to put off or go without care, including the cost of health care relative to a family's income and having a child with a physical, social, behavioral or cognitive limitation such as asthma, autism or obesity.

Investigators, led by Lauren E. Wisk, a doctoral student and graduate research assistant in the School of Medicine and Public Health at University of Wisconsin, Madison, examined data from the 2001-2006 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys on 6,273 families with at least one child. Excessive financial burden was defined as insurance premiums and out-of-pocket health care expenses exceeding 10 percent of family income. Delayed or forgone care was defined as putting off or going without medical care or prescription medications for a parent or child due to cost and/or insurance-related reasons.

Results showed that experiencing excessive financial burden, having a child with an ongoing activity limitation and a parent having intermittent insurance all increased the likelihood that families would delay or go without care. However, when the parent and child had the same insurance, they were more likely to get the care they needed.

Additionally, significant racial/ethnic and income-related disparities existed in the experience of delayed or forgone care. For example, non-Hispanic black families were less likely to report delayed or forgone care than non-Hispanic white families. Meanwhile, families whose income was less than 100 percent of the federal poverty level were more likely to delay or go without care than families with incomes at or above 400 percent of the poverty level.

"Every U.S. family has a finite amount of resources available to them, and every day they have to make decisions about how to allocate those resources. This is especially true in today's economy where you hear people talk about 'feeling the pinch,'" Wisk said. "This study shows the unfortunate reality of the situation. Families aren't choosing to spend their money on going to the doctor when someone is sick because of how much it cost them to see the doctor last time. They're sacrificing their health because it costs too much to be healthy."

Wisk said public policies that reduce financial burden and provide insurance for families as a unit rather than individuals, such as BadgerCare in Wisconsin, may allow families to get the care they need. "Moreover, families of children with activity limitations represent a particularly vulnerable group," she said, "and policies are needed to help provide accessible, affordable health care for these children."

Even when families are insured, they still bear part of the burden of health care costs (through premiums, deductibles, co-pays, etc.), she noted. When these costs exceed a certain threshold relative to a family's available income, they delay or forgo health care.

The researchers are planning to study how delaying or forgoing care affects health down the road. "We expect that if people aren't getting the care they need, they'll be sicker as a result," Wisk said. "When you put this all together and look at the big picture, the cost of health care in the U.S. could actually be causing Americans to be sicker."


'/>"/>

Contact: Susan Martin
ssmartin@aap.org
847-434-7877
American Academy of Pediatrics
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. Accountable care organizations have potential to curb costs and improve health care
2. Research finds dispense as written prescriptions may add $7.7 billion to annual health care costs
3. Breast Cancer Drug Tamoxifen Saves Lives, Medical Costs: Study
4. Aging with grace: In-home assessments lead to better care, lower health costs
5. Aging in place preserves seniors independence, reduces care costs, MU researchers find
6. Parents Tend to Focus on Joy, Not Costs, of Raising Children
7. Going Green May Cut Hospital Costs
8. Health care spending: Study shows high imaging costs for defensive purposes
9. Controlling the rising costs of cardiovascular care
10. U.S. Heart Disease Costs Expected to Soar
11. Cancer costs projected to reach at least $158 billion in 2020
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... ... The Lung Institute has partnered with the Gulfcoast North Area ... at their clinic in downtown Tampa. The class is complimentary for the public. Register ... a free downloadable 4 Week Smoking Cessation Guide for those who are ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... 26, 2016 , ... American orthopedic surgeon and internationally recognized ... Horizon International (BHI), Brian Mehling, M.D., spoke at an International Conference and Expo ... in Chicago, IL, USA. Dr. Mehling’s presentation was focused on stem cell therapy ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... TN (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2016 , ... ... fitness education and products recently hosted the first PowerWave Instructor Certification Course in ... who lead a group of fitness professional through the 8 hour interactive course ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... 2016 , ... On May 23rd during the National Eye Institute’s “Healthy Vision ... advocate, was honored by Ashram, Inc. as the world’s foremost water visionary. , “Sharon ... banks of the Nile to fill their red clay pots with life-sustaining water.” Said ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... Workrite Ergonomics ... leadership and to further develop their rapidly expanding portfolio of customer and end ... a concentration in Marketing and an M.B.A. with concentration in management from Bryant ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/26/2016)... , May 26, 2016 ... Associated With Both Cost Savings and Overall ... plc (LSE: BTG), an international specialist healthcare company, ... at the 21st Annual Meeting of ISPOR (International ... treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using yttrium-90 glass ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... FDA 510(k) clearance covers ... for urological and surgical applications Mauna ... Cellvizio®, the multidisciplinary confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) platform, ... US with the 12 th 510(k) clearance ... This new FDA clearance covers Confocal Miniprobes indicated ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... GERMANTOWN, Maryland , May 25, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... Frankfurt Prime Standard: QIA) today announced that the company has ... GmbH to develop and commercialize predictive assays in oncology. An ... a marker to predict effectiveness of anthracycline treatment in triple ... are pleased to partner with Therawis, which developed the PITX2 ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: