Navigation Links
Iowa State study finds mom's beliefs may impact their kids' alcohol use
Date:9/18/2008

AMES, Iowa Mothers, take note. If you really want to curb your teens' chances of using alcohol, help them develop a self-view that doesn't include drinking. According to a new Iowa State University study, the power of positive thinking by moms may limit their children's alcohol use.

But beware. The opposite is also true.

"When mothers overestimated their teens' future use of alcohol, the teens developed the self-view that they were likely to drink alcohol in the future, which ultimately led them to drink more," said Stephanie Madon, an ISU associate professor of psychology and lead author of the study.

Madon collaborated on the study with ISU graduate students Ashley Buller, Kyle Scherr and Jennifer Willard; Max Guyll, an assistant professor of psychology; and Richard Spoth, director of the Partnerships in Prevention Science Institute at Iowa State. They analyzed data obtained from a series of interviews with nearly 800 Iowa mothers and their children over three to five years.

Their paper, "The Mediation of Mothers' Self-Fulfilling Effects on Their Children's Alcohol Use: Self-Verification, Informational Conformity, and Modeling Processes," was recently published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, a professional journal of the American Psychological Association.

The team's previous research had found a link between a mother's belief about her child's likelihood of using alcohol and her child's actual use in junior high school and high school.

"We previously found that mothers' beliefs about their teen's future use of alcohol were about 50 percent correct and 50 percent incorrect, and that the incorrect portion of mothers' beliefs created a self-fulfilling prophecy -- teens behaved like their mothers had incorrectly expected them to," Madon said.

Their latest study builds upon those results.

"What we were trying to do in this paper was understand the mechanisms involved in the self-fulfilling prophecy process," Madon said. "We know that mothers have self-fulfilling effects on their kids' alcohol use through the past work that we've done. What we wanted to do here was understand 'How is that happening? What are the mechanisms that are creating that?'

"We derived our hypothesis from three large, well-known theories in the social/psychological literature -- self-verification theory, research on conformity and social learning theory as it pertains to modeling processes," she said.

According to Madon, self-verification theory proposes that people are motivated to confirm what they already believe to be true about themselves. The study found strong evidence that a mother's beliefs regarding her child's likelihood of using alcohol altered her child's self-view in either a positive or negative direction. The child then validated that new self-view by acting consistently with it later on.

"What people believe ultimately has an impact on what actually occurs," Madon said. "But it's not just because they believe it. It's not magic. When we believe something -- even if we're wrong -- when we believe it's true, we act as though it is. And sometimes when you act as though something's true, your behaviors will cause the belief to become true.

"So I think the moral here is to help children develop positive and pro-social self-concepts about themselves, because children are likely to make choices that match how they view themselves," she said.

The study also found some evidence that modeling -- a tendency for people to learn by watching others -- may alter a child's alcohol use. Madon says they had a little bit of support for modeling as it related to friends' alcohol use.

"We hypothesized that mothers may influence who their children are friends with and that children may learn how to behave by watching what their friends do," she said.

But there was no evidence that children conformed their own belief to their mothers' on how acceptable it was for adolescents, in general, to use alcohol.

"How acceptable children thought it was for adolescents to drink alcohol was explained by their own self-views, not by their mothers' beliefs about them. And that's not surprising given that what you think about yourself is going to be strongly tied to what you think is acceptable behavior," Madon said.

She says that it's still a good idea for mothers to instill in their children the belief that adolescent alcohol use is unacceptable, since the study did show a direct effect of teens' perceptions regarding the acceptability of alcohol use on their own drinking.

"The more acceptable teens believed adolescent alcohol use was, the more alcohol they tended to drink themselves," Madon said.


'/>"/>

Contact: Mike Ferlazzo
ferlazzo@iastate.edu
515-294-8986
Iowa State University
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. U.S. District Court in Delaware Reinstates Damage Awards to Cordis Corporation on Patents Infringed by Medtronic, Inc. and Boston Scientific Corporation
2. Staten Island University Hospital to Pay the U.S. $74 Million to Settle Claims of Defrauding Federal Health Care Programs
3. Department of Justice, Federal Trade Commission Issue Joint Statement on Certificate-of-Need Laws in Illinois
4. High School Football Penalty Flags Turn Blue to Honor Coach and Raise Awareness of Prostate Cancer
5. MEDais Predictive Analytics Impact How State Medicaid Agencies Triage High- Risk Members
6. El Camino Hospital Selects ITelagen for Multimillion-Dollar Electronic Medical Records (EMR) Initiative; Program Will Offer More Than 100 Participating Physicians State-of-the-Art Service and Support
7. Statement by Lance Armstrong Regarding Global Cancer Fight and His Return to Professional Cycling
8. Anti-inflammatory drugs may mask prostate cancer marker
9. Common painkillers lower levels of prostate cancer biomarker
10. Study Links Serum Calcium, Prostate Cancer Death
11. Texas Access to Justice Foundation Awards More Than $24 Million to Nonprofits Across the State for Legal Aid to Poor
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/28/2017)... NY (PRWEB) , ... April 28, 2017 , ... It's ... there are a number of illnesses that are unclear as to whether or not ... their heads. Bronchitis is one of these illnesses. So, FindaTopDoc took a look into ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... ... affects much more than energy – it also has mental and physical benefits. According to ... time, which can increase the risk of having a car accident. , This week ... to help you sleep better and feel better:, , Turn off ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... , ... The Radiology Business Management Association (RBMA) is pleased to ... election process has been in place since the RBMA was founded in 1968 with ... succeeds Jim Hamilton, MHA, CMM, FRBMA, as president. Dr. Dickerson the chief executive officer ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... , ... April 28, 2017 , ... ... America (UCAOA) and College of Urgent Care Medicine will host industry leaders for ... and speakers will help those in the industry adapt to the issues currently ...
(Date:4/28/2017)... ... April 28, 2017 , ... Yisrayl Hawkins, Pastor and Overseer at The House of Yahweh ... Creator responds to and which He does not. Yisrayl says with so many titles ... the true name, but he says with a little Scripture, backed with a lot of ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:4/19/2017)... EAST HANOVER, N.J. , April 19, 2017 ... study conducted by the National Heart, Lung, and ... Health (NIH) demonstrating that 58% of patients with ... at six months when treated with eltrombopag at ... treatment 1 . The study evaluated three sequential ...
(Date:4/18/2017)... April 18, 2017  Cardinal Health (NYSE: ... fiscal 2017 earnings per share (EPS) guidance and providing ... is in conjunction with this morning,s announcement of the ... and Nutritional Insufficiency businesses. Cardinal Health now ... will be at the bottom of its previous guidance ...
(Date:4/18/2017)... Viverae ® , a leader in workplace ... IBM ® Watson Campaign Automation, implementing behavioral messaging ... a personalized experience. Through digital engagement, the platform prompts ... real time. The enhanced experience drives engagement by focusing ... they are in their journey to health. ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: