Navigation Links
Introducing 'more patient reality' into NHS spending decisions
Date:1/24/2013

A study by health economists at the University of York has, for the first time, produced an estimate of the impact on other NHS patients of new and more costly drugs and other treatments.

This research suggests a refinement of the way the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) gauges the cost-effectiveness of new interventions. It also has implications for the prices that the NHS can afford to pay for new drugs when the value-based pricing scheme for all new drugs is introduced by the Government in 2014.

The project was funded by the Medical Research Council Methodology Research Programme to establish methods that can estimate the cost-effectiveness threshold for NICE using routinely available data.

NICE assesses the health benefits of new drugs and other treatments. It also assesses whether these benefits are greater than the health likely to be lost for other NHS patients as other treatments are displaced to accommodate the additional NHS costs. To make this assessment NICE uses a 'threshold', which represents how much additional NHS cost would displace an amount of health; measured by quality-adjusted life years (QALY).

Since 2004 NICE has used a threshold range of 20,000 to 30,000 per QALY. It has been widely recognised for many years that this range is not based on evidence. The researchers at York have estimated a more accurate threshold to be 18,317 per QALY (based on 2008 expenditure).

Analysis of the uncertainty surrounding this estimate indicates that the chance the threshold is less than 20,000 per QALY is 64 per cent and the chance that it is less than 30,000 is 92 per cent.

Although there are other sources of uncertainty, there are good reasons to believe that 18,317 per QALY is, on balance, likely to be an overestimate of the 'true' threshold especially for new drugs that impose greater costs on the NHS. The research found no evidence that the threshold had increased with the NHS budget (2007 to 2008) and found some evidence that the threshold is likely to fall as the NHS comes under greater financial pressure.

The analysis also provides estimates of where and what 'type' of health is likely to be lost. It quantifies the additional deaths, life years lost and the impact on quality of life of those with different types of disease as a result of the introduction of new products. For example, based on a QALY threshold of 18,317, the approval of Ranibizumab for the treatment of diabetic macular oedema would have imposed up to 80 million on the NHS each year when it was first considered by NICE. This would have displaced the equivalent of 4,367 QALYs equating to 295 additional deaths and 1,337 life years forgone, most of which were likely to occur among patients suffering from cancer or circulatory, respiratory or gastro-intestinal disease.

These methods also allow other aspects of health outcome to be incorporated in the estimate of the threshold. For example, the value based pricing scheme due to be introduced by the Government in 2014 may include some additional weight for health benefits in diseases which impose a large health burden and/or where there are wider social benefits for patients, their carers and the wider economy. The methods developed in this research will allow the same weights to be also attached to the type of health that is lost and estimate the wider social benefits that are likely to be lost when the NHS must accommodate the additional costs of new drugs.

Co-author Professor Mark Sculpher said: "It is crucial that the cost effectiveness threshold is seen as representing health forgone as the additional costs of new technologies are imposed on the fixed budgets of local commissioners. For decisions made by NICE and many policy options considered by the NHS and Department Health, this is the key to establishing the value for money of new services."

Co-author Professor Karl Claxton added: "The work demonstrates that the threshold to gauge cost-effectiveness and how much the NHS can afford to pay for benefits offered by new drugs is a scientific question that can be informed by evidence and analysis.

"This study also starts to make the other NHS patients, who ultimately bear the opportunity cost, less abstract so they can be properly taken into account when decisions about new health technologies are being made."


'/>"/>
Contact: David Garner
david.garner@york.ac.uk
44-019-043-22153
University of York
Source:Eurekalert

Related medicine news :

1. ICM Trading Now Offers The Most Lucrative Rebate and Commission Structure for Introducing Brokers
2. KD LUXE Jewelry and Accessories: Introducing Chic Italian Silver and Stainless Collections in Beverly Hills and Hollywood
3. Introducing ActiveAvenue: Your Road to Recreation
4. Introducing decision aids may lower surgery for arthritis
5. Energy Infusion Meets Skin Care: Introducing Dahryn Silver Gel™
6. Introducing Aleratec’s New Automatic Shredder: The RoboShredder; Hands Free Information Security
7. Introducing Screenplay: An interactive childrens waiting room experience
8. Can you train yourself to have more willpower?
9. Candida Treatment
10. How “Yeast Infection No More” Can Help People Treat Candida Effectively - Health Reviews
11. More Time at Family Dinners Might Curb Obesity in Kids
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/26/2016)... Knoxville, TN (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2016 ... ... professional fitness education and products recently hosted the first PowerWave Instructor Certification Course ... Fouts, who lead a group of fitness professional through the 8 hour interactive ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... OncLive® , a ... Cancer Institute-designated University of Virginia (UVA) Cancer Center to its quickly ... and marketing teams will publicize and promote public awareness of UVA Cancer Center’s ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... Redwood City, CA (PRWEB) , ... May 26, 2016 , ... ... time, Silicon Valley-based startup, The Dough Bar, has ignited an undeniable buzz ... shake -- a doughnut. But not just any doughnut.  These doughnuts are packed with ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... Workrite ... sales leadership and to further develop their rapidly expanding portfolio of customer and ... with a concentration in Marketing and an M.B.A. with concentration in management from ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... ... May 26, 2016 , ... Saint Francis ... several years, and the efforts have paid off. Since implementation of these ... of care to enhance perioperative patient experiences and reduce costly complications. Since implementation ...
Breaking Medicine News(10 mins):
(Date:5/24/2016)... 24, 2016 Open Access Journal ... Neurophysiology  Elsevier , a world-leading provider ... today announced the launch of Clinical Neurophysiology ... that focuses on clinical practice issues in clinical neurophysiology. ... series, normal values and didactic reviews. It is an ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... 2016 Een app die artsen ... collectief patiënten kunnen behandelen, hun kennis kunnen delen en ... de nieuwe en revolutionaire MDLinking App, ontwikkeld door een ... dr. Hans Flu en oncologisch chirurg dr. Gijs ... is, wordt op dinsdag 24 mei officieel gepresenteerd op ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... , May 23, 2016 Global ... 163 pages, profiles 12 companies and the Paclitaxel analysis ... figures on the industry and its players. ... comprehensive in nature, details the current state of the ... including definitions, classifications, applications and industry chain structure. The ...
Breaking Medicine Technology: